Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafehuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: Golden Vanity Variants

DigiTrad:
GOLDEN VANITY
SINKING OF THE GRAF SPEE
THE BOLD TRELLITEE
THE GOLDEN VANITY
THE GOLDEN VANITY (6)
THE GREEN WILLOW TREE
THE LOWDOWN LONESOME LOW
THE LOWLANDS LOW (7)
THE SWEET KUMADEE
THE TURKEY-ROGHER LEE and the YELLOW GOLDEN TREE


Related threads:
golden vanity (10)
Donald Duck and The Golden Vanity (11)
Gold.Vanity. Can you REALLY sink a ship? (164)
Recording of Golden Vanity (46)
translating the golden vanity (14)
Lyr Req: The Turkish Reverie (8)
Lyr Req: Lowlands Low (Warde Ford, Child #286) (6)
Lyr Req: Frank Proffitt's Lowland Low (#286) (6)
Lyr Req: johnny doughty's golden vanity (6)
Lyr Req: duncan williamson's golden vanity (5)
Lyr Req: ollie jacobs's golden vanity (bronson) (1)
Looking to ID This Song Lyric (Golden Vanity) (11)
Penguin: The Golden Vanity (3)
The Sweet Kumadee (14)


Gene Smith 07 Dec 97 - 12:34 AM
Bruce O. 07 Dec 97 - 03:57 PM
Janice D. 23 Jun 99 - 08:36 AM
Bert 23 Jun 99 - 08:50 AM
Roger in Baltimore 23 Jun 99 - 09:12 AM
John Hindsill 23 Jun 99 - 09:32 AM
Steve Parkes 23 Jun 99 - 09:45 AM
MichaelM 23 Jun 99 - 10:36 AM
Joe Offer 23 Jun 99 - 12:50 PM
Wally Macnow 23 Jun 99 - 02:07 PM
Joe Offer 23 Jun 99 - 02:45 PM
Chris Seymour 23 Jun 99 - 07:18 PM
Susan of DT 23 Jun 99 - 08:06 PM
Barry Finn 23 Jun 99 - 10:43 PM
DonMeixner 23 Jun 99 - 10:53 PM
Art Thieme 23 Jun 99 - 11:03 PM
Art Thieme 23 Jun 99 - 11:05 PM
Sandy Paton 23 Jun 99 - 11:37 PM
Art Thieme 24 Jun 99 - 02:01 AM
bbc 24 Jun 99 - 09:44 PM
Sandy Paton 24 Jun 99 - 10:03 PM
Nogs 30 Jun 99 - 03:02 PM
bigJ 30 Jun 99 - 04:48 PM
bigJ 30 Jun 99 - 04:53 PM
Amos 24 Jul 04 - 01:03 PM
Roberto 24 Jul 04 - 02:18 PM
Roberto 24 Jul 04 - 02:26 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Jul 04 - 02:48 PM
Haruo 11 Oct 04 - 11:28 PM
Mr Happy 23 Nov 09 - 11:28 AM
Mr Happy 23 Nov 09 - 11:32 AM
Haruo 29 Nov 09 - 07:58 PM
Mysha 29 Nov 09 - 09:53 PM
GUEST,Georgina Boyes 30 Nov 09 - 05:12 AM
GUEST,OldNicKilby 30 Nov 09 - 08:58 AM
RTim 30 Nov 09 - 10:15 AM
Acme 30 Nov 09 - 02:22 PM
Haruo 30 Nov 09 - 03:04 PM
Gibb Sahib 30 Nov 09 - 08:24 PM
Brian Peters 01 Dec 09 - 05:37 AM
GUEST,Ian Gill 01 Dec 09 - 06:42 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Apr 10 - 04:29 PM
GUEST,bill S from Melbourne 16 Apr 10 - 07:00 AM
Stewie 16 Apr 10 - 10:41 AM
Goose Gander 16 Apr 10 - 11:07 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Apr 10 - 11:18 AM
GUEST,Hilary 23 Jan 11 - 07:00 PM
Nigel Parsons 18 Feb 11 - 10:12 AM
Brian Peters 24 Mar 11 - 10:56 AM
Lighter 24 Mar 11 - 11:03 AM
SINSULL 24 Mar 11 - 11:08 AM
Brian Peters 24 Mar 11 - 11:30 AM
Richard Mellish 24 Mar 11 - 07:50 PM
dick greenhaus 24 Mar 11 - 08:33 PM
Brian Peters 25 Mar 11 - 05:49 AM
Richard Mellish 25 Mar 11 - 08:03 AM
Brian Peters 25 Mar 11 - 08:06 AM
Richard Mellish 10 Apr 11 - 04:51 PM
The Sandman 10 Apr 11 - 05:44 PM
Jim Carroll 10 Apr 11 - 05:48 PM
The Sandman 10 Apr 11 - 05:52 PM
The Sandman 10 Apr 11 - 05:53 PM
The Sandman 10 Apr 11 - 05:58 PM
The Sandman 10 Apr 11 - 06:35 PM
Richard Mellish 24 Apr 11 - 12:18 PM
Brian Peters 12 May 11 - 05:42 AM
GUEST,Val bayley 24 Aug 11 - 12:47 PM
Acme 24 Aug 11 - 01:57 PM
Joe_F 24 Aug 11 - 08:08 PM
GUEST,Grace 28 Aug 11 - 09:11 PM
Mysha 28 Aug 11 - 11:59 PM
GUEST,Iona 29 Nov 11 - 01:35 AM
Richie 09 Jan 14 - 05:55 PM
Lighter 09 Jan 14 - 07:58 PM
Richie 09 Jan 14 - 10:28 PM
Desert Dancer 10 Jan 14 - 12:44 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:










Subject: Golden Vanity
From: Gene Smith
Date: 07 Dec 97 - 12:34 AM

I recently came across a reference to the history of the song we know as Golden Vanity, but I have lost the reference. Does anyone know a good source to look in, and/or the song's history? If I remember right, it is quite old and went through several rewrites before assuming the form we recognize today. Any clues?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Bruce O.
Date: 07 Dec 97 - 03:57 PM

The earliest known version is the broadside ballad coded index as ZN2370 in my broadside index on the internet.This is at
www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/17thc_index.html
The licensing statement 'This may be Printed. R. L. S' was used only from about June to November of 1685.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Golden Vanity
From: Janice D.
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 08:36 AM

Hi folks -I'm doing research on the song "Golden Vanity" in all its different variations and need some suggestions on recorded sources, anybody know and can recommend a record or CD with a variant of this song on it? Thanks Janice Dunkirk


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Bert
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 08:50 AM

Lonnie Donnegan did a version that was a bit different.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 09:12 AM

Odetta recorded it.

She varied the melodic line quite a bit. It would be a very old recording from the '60's.

Roger in Baltimore


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: John Hindsill
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 09:32 AM

You will also want to look under the title Turkey Reveille for this song and similar related titles. My favorite version of Golden Vanity is by PP&M recorded in late 80s early 90s on "Flowers & Stones" CD. Aversion by Bash Kennett in "Songs of Ship & Shore" (probably out of print) has a varient ending. Good luck on your research---John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 09:45 AM

Aka "The merry golden tree". I'm fascinated by the way the name changes as the song travels around. Be sure to post all the versions you find to the DT, if they're not already there.

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: MichaelM
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 10:36 AM

Have a listen to the Friends of Fiddler's Green album (now on CD) "This Side of The Ocean". Nice version with the late David Parry taking the lead.

Michael


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Joe Offer
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 12:50 PM

This song is Child #286. If you put #286 in the search box on this page, you come up with 9 versions, and I'll betcha there are many others that didn't get the Child Ballad tag when they were entered in the database or the Forum. hey, this could be just like one of those puzzle pictures - "see how many of your animal friends you can find in this picture....
There was a less-than-fruitful discussion of "Kumadee" here, of "Vanity" here and here. "Lowlands, Low" is not related, but easily confused here and here. That should give us a start.
-Joe Offer-


Here's the lengthy entry for this song in the Traditional Ballad Index:

Golden Vanity, The [Child 286]

DESCRIPTION: A ship is threatened by a foreign galley. The ship's cabin boy, promised gold and the captain's daughter as wife, sinks the galley. He comes back to his ship; the captain will not take him from the water. (The ending is variable)
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: c. 1685 (broadside)
KEYWORDS: sea battle death promise lie abandonment
HISTORICAL REFERENCES:
c. 1552-1618 - Life of Sir Walter Raleigh (one of whose ships was named "The Sweet Trinity")
FOUND IN: Britain(England(All),Scotland(Aber,Bord)) Ireland US(All) Canada(Mar,Newf,Ont)
REFERENCES (86 citations):
Child 286, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (3 texts, 2 tunes) {Bronson's #52, #55}
Bronson 286, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (111 versions+1 in addenda)
BronsonSinging 286, "The Golden Vanity" (7 versions: #2, #27, #43, #71, #74, #94, #102)
Greig #116, p. 1, "The Lowlands O"; Greig #119, p. 2, "The Lowlands Low" (2 texts)
GreigDuncan1 37, "The Golden Vanity" (5 texts, 4 tunes) {D=Bronson's #13}
Ord, pp. 450-451, "The Lowlands Low" (1 text)
Broadwood/Maitland, pp. 182-183, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
Williams-Thames, pp. 199-200, "The Golden Vanitee" (1 text) (also Wiltshire-WSRO Wt 444)
Reeves-Circle 51, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text)
RoudBishop #9, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
OShaughnessy-Lincolnshire 7, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
BarryEckstormSmyth pp. 339-347, "The Golden Vanity" (4 texts plus 2 fragments, 2 tunes) {Bronson's #108, #66}
Flanders-Ancient4, pp. ,188-263 "The Sweet Trinity or the Golden Vanity" (39 texts plus 11 fragments, 18 tunes) {E=Bronson's #71, HH=#64}
Ford-Vagabond, pp. 103-106, "The Goulden Vanitee" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #53}
Belden, pp. 97-100, "The Golden Vanity" (3 texts)
Randolph 38, "The Lowlands Low" (4 texts plus a fragment, 3 tunes) {A=Bronson's #69, D=#48, E=#51}
Randolph/Cohen, pp. 56-59, "The Lowlands Low" (1 text, 1 tune -- Randolph's 38A) {Bronson's #69}
AbrahamsRiddle, pp. 142-146, "The Golden Willow Tree" (1 text, 1 tune, plus some excerpts)
Davis-Ballads 47, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (4 texts plus 2 fragments, 1 tune entitled "The Turkish-Rogherlee and the Yellow Golden Tree, or Lowlands Low") {Bronson's #109}
Davis-More 43, pp. 339-343, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (1 text, 1 tune)
BrownII 47, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (3 texts plus mention of 2 more)
BrownSchinhanIV 47, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (6 excerpts, 6 tunes)
Chappell-FSRA 21, "The Green Willow Tree" (2 texts, 1 tune) {Bronson's #50}
JonesLunsford, pp. 196-197, "Merrie Golden Tree" (1 text, 1 tune)
Morris, #174, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (2 texts)
Hudson 25, pp. 125-127, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (1 text)
Moore-Southwest 56, "There Was a Little Ship" (1 text, 1 tune)
Owens-2ed, pp. 38-40, "The Merry Golden Tree" (1 text, 1 tune)
Bronner-Eskin1 5, "Golden Willow Tree" (1 text, 1 tune)
Boswell/Wolfe 20, pp. 37-39, "There Was a Ship Sailing" (1 text, 1 tune)
Scarborough-SongCatcher, pp. 184-189, "The Sweet Trinity; The Golden Vanity" (2 texts; the first, with no title, is from Randolph; the second has local title "The Golden Willow Tree"; 1 tune on pp. 406-407) {Bronson's #107}
Shellans, pp. 62-63, "The Lonesome Sea Ballad" (1 text, 1 tune)
Rosenbaum, p. 10, "The Little Shipi" (1 text, 1 tune)
Brewster 25, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (3 texts, 1 tune) {Bronson's #68}
Gardner/Chickering 82, "The Lowlands Low" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #110, related to "The Arkansas Traveller"}
Flanders/Brown, pp. 230-231, "The Green Willow Trees" (1 text)
Linscott, pp. 136-137, "The Gallant Victory or Lowlands Low" (1 short text, with no hint of the Captain's refusal to save the boy; he is hauled aboard and dies, 1 tune)
Creighton/Senior, pp. 101-106, "The Sweet Trinity, or The Golden Vanity" (3 texts plus 2 fragments, 4 tunes) {Bronson's #44, #17, #19, #18}
Creighton-NovaScotia 10, "Sweet Trinity; or The Golden Vanity" (1 text, called "Golden Vallady" by the singer, 1 tune) {Bronson's #21}
Creighton-SNewBrunswick 6, "The Golden Vanity" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Greenleaf/Mansfield 19, "The Golden Vanitie" (2 fragments)
Colcord, pp. 154-156, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #45}
Harlow, pp. 35-36, "Golden Vanitee" (1 text, 1 tune)
Hugill, pp. 62-64, "Lowlands Low" (3 texts, 3 tunes) [AbEd, pp. 58-60]
Logan, pp. 42-46, "The Goulden Vanitie (Golden Vanity, or the Low Lands Low)" (2 texts)
Leach, pp. 667-670, "The Sweet Trinity or The Golden Vanity" (3 texts)
Leach-Heritage, pp. 89-90, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text)
Leach-Labrador 8, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
Wyman-Brockway I, p. 72, "The Mary Golden Tree, or The Lonesome Low" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #37}
Cambiaire, pp. 93-94, "The Merry Golden Tree" (1 text)
Ritchie-Southern, pp. 74-75, "Lonesome Sea" (1 text, 1 tune) {cf. Bronson's #41, which is also by Jean Ritchie and uses the same tune but a different title and slightly different words}
McNeil-SFB1, pp. 34-36, "The Green Willow Tree" (1 text, 1 tune)
Friedman, p. 409, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text)
FSCatskills 67, "The Bold Trellitee" (1 text, 1 tune)
OBB 132, "The 'Golden Vanity'" (1 text)
Warner 104, "Lowland Low (or, The Golden Willow Tree)" (1 text, 1 tune)
Peters, pp. 108-109, "A Ship Set Sail for North America" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #85}
SharpAp 41, "The Golden Vanity" (7 texts plus 3 fragments, 11 tunes) {Bronson's #94, #93, #88, #104, #43, #46, #78, #90, #99, #39, #106}
Sharp-100E 14, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #1}
Niles 61, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (1 text, 1 tune)
Sharp/Karpeles-80E 28, "The Weeping Willow Tree (The Golden Vanity)" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #94}
Vaughan Williams/Lloyd, pp. 46-47, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #35}
Scott-BoA, pp. 138-139, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
Fowke/Mills/Blume, pp. 38-40, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
Fowke/MacMillan 82, "The 'Green Willow Tree'" (1 text, 1 tune)
Karpeles-Newfoundland 23, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text fragment, 1 tune)
Fowke-Ontario 4, "The Golden Vanity"; Fowke-Ontario 61, "The Green Willow Tree" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Lomax-Singing, pp. 210-212, "The Low-Down, Lonesome Low" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-FSNA 95, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune) {should be Bronson's #73, but heavily reworked}
Chase, pp. 120-121, "The Merry Golden Tree" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #74}
Abrahams/Foss, pp. 79-80, "Golden Willow Tree" (1 text, 1 tune)
LPound-ABS, 10, pp. 24-26, "The Lowlands Low" (1 text)
JHCox 32, "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)" (2 texts plus a fragment)
JHCoxIIA, #15A-C, pp. 64-69, "The Golden Vanity," "The Mary Golden Lee," "The Green Willow Tree" (3 texts, 1 tune) {Bronson's #38, which -- despite Cox -- he calls "The Weeping Willow Tree"; this version has two American ships "The Weeping Willow Tree" and "The Golden Silveree"}
Coleman/Bregman, pp. 16-17, "The Golden Willow Tree" (1 text, 1 tune)
Hubbard, #18, "The Golden Vanity" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Ashton-Sailor, #75, "Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing in the Low-lands" (1 text)
Darling-NAS, pp. 64-66, "The Sweet Trinity"; "The Golden Willow Tree" (1 text plus a fragment)
Fireside, p. 172, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-FSWB, p. 213, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text)
BBI, ZN2370, "Sir Walter Rawleigh ha's built a Ship"
DT 286, VANTYGL1* VANTIGL2* VANTIGL3* VANTIGL4* (VANTYGL9)
ADDITIONAL: John Ashton, _A Century of Ballads_, Elliot Stock, London, 1887; reprinted 1968 by Singing Tree Press, pp. 201-204, "Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing in the Low-Lands" (1 text)
James P. Leary, Compiler and Annotator, _Wisconsin Folklore_ University of Wisconsin Press, 2009, article "Kentucky Folksong in Northern Wisconsin" by Asher E. Treat, pp. 229-230, "A Ship Set Sail for North America" (1 text, 1 tune, sung by Mrs. M. G. Jacobs, Maud Jacobs, Pearl Jacobs Borusky) {Bronson's #85}
Walter de la Mare, _Come Hither_, revised edition, 1928; #411, "The Golden Vanity" (1 text)
Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 58, "Lowlands" (a two-verse fragment, on of which is from "The Golden Vanity" and the other about "Pompey" although it's too short to know which Pompey song is meant)

ST C286 (Full)
Roud #122
RECORDINGS:
Almanac Singers, "The Golden Vanity" (General 5016B, 1941; on Almanac02, Almanac03, AlmanacCD1)
Horton Barker, "The Turkish Rebilee" (on Barker01) {Bronson's #74}
Justus Begley, "Golden Willow Tree" (AFS, 1937; on KMM)
Bill Cameron, "The Golden Vanity" (on FSB5) {Bronson's #10}
The Carter Family, "Sinking In The Lonesome Sea" (Conqueror 8644/Okeh 03160, 1936; Columbia 37756) {Bronson's #73}
Dodie Chalmers, "The Golden Victory (The Golden Vanity) (on FSBBAL2) {Bronson's #33}
Johnny Doughty, "The Golden Vanity" (on JDoughty01, HiddenE)
Warde Ford, "The Lowlands Low" [fragment] (AFS 4194 A2, 1938; in AMMEM/Cowell) {Bronson's #20}
Sam Hazel, "The Golden Willow Tree" (AFS 2095 B2, 3096 A, 3096 B1, 1939)
[Mrs.?] Ollie Jacobs, "A Ship Set Sail for North America" (AFS, 1941; on LC58) {Bronson's #86}
Paul Joines, "Green Willow Tree" (on Persis1)
Joe Kelly, "The Golden Vanity" (on Ontario1)
Paralee McCloud, "The Little Ship" (on FolkVisions1)
Jimmy Morris, "The Golden Willow Tree" (AFS, 1937; on LC58) {Bronson's #105}
New Lost City Ramblers, "Sinking in the Lonesome Sea" (on NLCR06, NLCR11)
Frank Proffitt, "Lowlands Low" [excerpt] (on USWarnerColl01)
Almeda Riddle, "Merry Golden Tree" (on LomaxCD1707)
Jean Ritchie, "The Merry Golden Tree" (on JRitchie01) {Bronson's #41}
Pete Seeger, "The Golden Vanity" (on PeteSeeger16) (Commodore 3006, n.d. -- but this may be the same recording as the General disc by the Almanac Singers)
Rob Walker, "The Lowlands Low" [fragment] (AFS 4194 A3, 1938; in AMMEM/Cowell) {Bronson's #49}
Doug Wallin, "The Golden Vanity" (on Wallins1)

BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Harding B 11(1086), "The Golden Vanity" or "The Low Lands Low," H. Such (London), 1849-1862
NLScotland, L.C.Fol.70(122a), "Lowlands Low," Poet's Box (Glasgow), 1877; also L.C.Fol.70(103b), "Lowlands Low"

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Louisiana Lowlands" (lyrics)
SAME TUNE:
Sinking of the Great Ship (BrownII, #287, pp. 662-663, the "A" text)
ALTERNATE TITLES:
The Lonesome Low
The Merry Golden Tree
The Sweet Kumadee
The Weep-Willow Tree
The Turkish Revoloo
Cabin Boy
Lowland Sea
Ye Gowden Vanitie
NOTES: Connecting this song with actual events is impossible even if one accepts Sir Walter Raleigh as the murderous captain. The following dates may, however, provide some guidelines:
1453 - Fall of Constantinople gives the Turks good access to the Mediterranean (Lowland) Sea.
1571 - Battle of Lepanto cripples the Turkish navy.
1588 - Voyage of the Spanish Armada. Spanish navy crippled.
As far as I know, every version lists the enemy as Spanish, Turkish, or French. It should be noted, however, that the Barbary pirates were often called "Turks," since the Ottoman Empire had (often nominal) soveriegnty over them.
Incidentally, while this song does not have a historical setting, the plot has historical antecedents; Bowers, p. 24 and note, mentions a 1605 pamphlet, "Two most unnatural and bloodie Murthers: The one by Maister Cauerly... the other by mistris Browne and her servant Peter." Apparently Peter, a servant, had been promised land and the girl's hand; when her father reneged, the young couple turned to murder.
The sinking of a ship by a youth is also apparently attested: Rodger, p. 46, says that a Saracen vessel threatened the fleet of Richard I on his way to the Third Crusade, but that one report claims it was sunk by a boy with an auger. Unfortunately, Rodger does not cite any primary sources for this account, and I don't believe sinking a ship with an auger is actually possible (by that time, ships had pumps and carpenters to plug leaks). I suspect that one of Rodger's sources actually heard a distorted version of this song.
Somewhat later, at the Battle of Sluys in 1340, the English fleet of Edward III "even [had] divers who tried to sink the enemy ships by boring holes in their hulls below water," according to Seward, p. 44. Sluys was a great English victory, but if the divers accomplished anything, I haven't heard of it. - RBW
In Fowke-Ontario 4 the drowned cabin boy returns as a ghost and -- never having said he would not sink it -- sinks the captain's ship. - BS
Bibliography
  • Bowers: Fredson Bowers, Elizabethan Revenge Tragedy, 1940 (I use the 1977 Princeton paperback edition)
  • Rodger: N. A. M. Rodger, The Safeguard of the Sea: A Naval History of Britain 660-1649 (1997; I use the 1999 Norton edition)
  • Seward: Desmond Seward, The Hundred Years War: The English in France, 1337-1453, 1978 (I used the 1982 Atheneum paperback)
Last updated in version 4.1
File: C286

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Wally Macnow
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 02:07 PM

You can find a version on the Fellside recording A Selection From The Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs

Wally


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Joe Offer
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 02:45 PM

You will find a number of recordings listed in Folk Music - an Index to Recorded Resources. Also check there for recordings of Weeping Willow Tree and Sinking in the Lonesome Sea. Here's Sweet Kumadee.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Chris Seymour
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 07:18 PM

Rory Block recorded a version. I'm also learning a North Carolina version from a friend -- I'll ask him if it's recorded and get back here if it is.

Chris Seymour


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Susan of DT
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 08:06 PM

Ewan MacColl English & Scottish Folk Ballads
David Jones Easy & Slow
Folk Songs of Britain, vol. 5
Cisco Houston
Gordon Bok et al Ways of Man


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Barry Finn
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 10:43 PM

There's also another recording Folk Songs of the United States, Library of Congress, "Anglo -American Ballads" LP#7. By the time this song reached the mountains the original galley (a sailing vessel with auxiliary sweep oars) had gone from Galilee to the British Roverie. Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), buccaneer & pirate along with his half brother, Sir Humphrey Gilbert, & his son were not as lucky or good at their trade as they were famous for some of their exploits. After 13 years in the Tower of London under sentence of death, for political intrigue, he was released & headed out to command another domed expedition, his son was killed & upon return his original sentence of death was invoked & he was hung. The earlier of the ballads (c.1635) was called "Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing In The Lowlands (Shewing how the famous Ship called the Sweet Trinity was taken by a false Gally & how it was again restored by the craft of a little Sea-boy, who sunk the Gally)". There is no tune given & S.Frank in his 'Book Of Pirate Songs' says that it is doubtful that it was ever much in circulation in it's original form in popular tradition. If you want these words let me knoe & I'll post them. Barry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: DonMeixner
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 10:53 PM

My favorite version of this song is by Art Thieme. I've never heard a version quite like his.

Don


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Art Thieme
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 11:03 PM

Don, thanks a bunch. It's great to hear that.

My version of "Golden Vanity" was available on a cassette put out by the Walnut Valley Festival in Winfield, Kansas called _Art Thieme-Live At Winfield_ (circa '84) Cathy Fink produced it along with Bob Redford of that great festival. I's way out of print---but if Janice D. would like it, I can dub it for her for a small fee. ($11.00)

Sorry for these blatent plugs lately for my things, but people have been asking about song's I've done & far be from me not to mention stuff that's out there and getable.

Art Thieme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Art Thieme
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 11:05 PM

WHOOPS---I'm at: folkart@ivnet.com

Art Thieme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 23 Jun 99 - 11:37 PM

Horton Barker, 73-year-old blind ballad singer from Chilhowie, Virginia, recorded a version for me that was included on the LP of his songs that was issued on Folkways before we started Folk-Legacy. It should be available in one form or another (custom cassette, for example) from Smithsonian/Folkways. Horton was one hellova singer!

Sandy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Art Thieme
Date: 24 Jun 99 - 02:01 AM

Sandy,

I'll never forget Horton Barker at the very first University of Chicago Folk Festival--1961. He had that huge audience in the palm of his hand singing unaccompanied ballads. Sandy did a solo performance there that year. It was before we knew what a fine singer Caroline was. That same year (I think) Horton was back in Chicago to do a solo concert in Old Town at the old LaSalle School. Joan Baez was also in town and she went to Horton's concert. He called her up on stage and they did an a capella duet harmony version of "Swing Low Sweet Chariot". It brought down the house. You wouldn't figure those two voices would work together, but they sure did! Horton Barker stood as straight as a ramrod on stage and always wore a suit when he performed. He was 86 years old then if I remember right.

Art


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: bbc
Date: 24 Jun 99 - 09:44 PM

I like the Bok, Muir, Trickett version on their The Ways of Man recording.

bbc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 24 Jun 99 - 10:03 PM

Has anybody done this yet? It's the listing from Keefer's Folk Index web site. (see the links page here.)

The Golden Vanity Rt - Weeping Willow Tree ; Sinking in the Lonesome Sea
1.American Ballads and Songs, Scribners, Bk (1972/1922), p 24 (Lowlands Low)
2.Bok, Gordon;, Ann Mayo Muir & Ed Trickett. Ways of Man, Folk Legacy FSI-068, LP (1978), cut#1.01
3.Brothers Four. Rally 'Round!, Columbia CL 1479, LP (196?), cut#A.04 (Gallant Argosy)
4.Cameron, Bill. Folk Songs of Britain, Vol 5. The Child Ballads, Vol. II, Caedmon TC 1146, LP (1961), cut#B.11
5.Dane, Barbara. Anthology of American Folk Songs, Tradition TR 2072, LP (196?), cut#A.04 (Turkey Reveille/Revery)
6.Dyer-Bennet, Richard. Richard Dyer-Bennet 2, Dyer-Bennet 2, LP (1956), cut#B.07 (Turkey Reveille/Revery)
7.Dyer-Bennet, Richard. Richard Dyer-Bennet No. 5. Requests, Dyer-Bennet 5000, LP (1958), cut#A.02
8.Ives, Burl. Ballads, United Artists UAL 3060, LP (1959), cut#A.06 (Turkey Reveille/Revery)
9.Jones, David. Easy and Slow, Minstrel JD-201, LP (1975), cut# 1
10.Kimble Family. Carroll County Pioneers, Marimac 9036, Cas (1992), cut# 14 (Golden Chain Tree)
11.MacColl, Ewan; and Peggy Seeger. Matching Songs of the British Isles and America, Riverside RLP 12-637, LP (196?), cut# 2
12.McCloud, Paralee. Folk Visions & Voices. Traditional Music & Song in North Georgia, University of Georgia, Bk (1983), p 10 (Little Ship)
13.McNeil, Brownie. Folksongs, Sonic, LP (195?), cut# 2 (Turkey Reveille/Revery)
14.Mitchell, Chad; Trio. Chad Mitchell Trio at the Bitter End, Kapp KL 1281, LP (196?), cut#B.02
15.New Lost City Ramblers. New Lost City Ramblers, Disc D 102, LP (196?), cut# 10 (Lonesome Sea)
16.Phipps Family. Phipps Family, Folkways FA 2375, LP (1965), cut# 9 (Golden Merry Tree)
17.Red Clay Ramblers. Stolen Love, Flying Fish FF-009, LP (1975), cut# 4
18.Reed, Susan. O Love Is Teasin', Elektra BLP-12051, LP (1985), cut#1.06
19.Riddle, Almeda. Folk Songs from the Ozarks, Prestige International INT 25006, LP (196?), cut# 1 (Merry Golden Tree)
20.Riddle, Almeda. Southern Journey. Vol. 7: Ozark Frontier, Rounder 1707, CD (1997), cut# 5 (Merry Golden Tree)
21.Ritchie, Jean. British Traditional Ballads in the Southern Mountains (Vol. 1), Folkways FA 2301, LP (1961), cut# 7 (Merry Golden Tree)
22.Scott and Stanley. Hard Times in the Country, Talkeetna TR 100, LP (1974), cut#A.07
23.Seeger, Peggy; and Ewan MacColl - Use MacColl, Ewan; and .... Everybody Sing, Vol 3., Riverside RLP-1420, LP (196?), cut#B.04b
24.Seeger, Pete. American Ballads, Folkways FA 2319, LP (1957), cut# 7
25.Stecher, Jody. Going Up on the Mountain, Bay 210,

I seem to have lost the cut# from the end of this listing. However, it's a pretty good list and might help you to compare versions.

Sandy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: Nogs
Date: 30 Jun 99 - 03:02 PM

John Roberts and Tony Barrand also did a version, sorry, I dont remember the album.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: bigJ
Date: 30 Jun 99 - 04:48 PM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity
From: bigJ
Date: 30 Jun 99 - 04:53 PM

Add:-

Johnny Doughty - "Round Rye Bay for More" LP - Topic 12TS324 (1977)
the same version appears on the "Hidden English" CD Topic TSCD600 (1994)
Stan Hugill - "Salty Foretopman" BBC Radio Merseyside cassette (1989) 'Golden Vanitee'.
Cyril Tawney - "Little Boy Billee" Neptune Tapse (cassette) NEP006 (1992) - 'Merry Golden Tree'
Woody Guthrie/ Cisco Houston - "More Songs By..." - Melodisc MLP-12-106 (c1950).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: The Golden Vanity Variant
From: Amos
Date: 24 Jul 04 - 01:03 PM

As far as I have been able to tell this version of The Golden Vanity is not in the DT, although it exists in various places on the Web. IIRC it follows the version sung by Pete Seeger, as well as PP&M.

There was a ship that sailed
All on the Lowland Sea,
And the name of the ship
Was the Golden Vanity
And they feared she would be taken
By the Spanish enemy
As she sailed upon the Lowland,
Lowland, Low
As she sailed upon the Lowland Sea.

Then up stepped the cabin boy
And boldly outspoke he
And he said to the captain,
"What would you give to me
If I would swim along side
Of the Spanish enemy
And sink her in the Lowland,
Lowland, Low
And sink her in the Lowland Sea?"

"Oh, I would give you silver
And I would give you gold,
And my own fairest daughter
To have and to hold,
If you will swim along side
Of our enemy of old
And sink her in the Lowland,
Lowland, Low
And sink her in the Lowland Sea!"

The boy he made him ready,
Then overboard sprang he,
And he swam alongside
Of the Spanish enemy
And with his brace and auger
In her side he bored holes three,
And he sank her in the Lowland,
Lowland, Low,
And he sank her in the Lowland Sea.

Then quickly he swam back
To the cheering of the crew
But the captain would not heed him
For his promise he did rue,
And he scorned his poor entreatings
When loudly he did sue,
And he left him in the Lowland,
Lowland, Low
And he left him in the Lowland Sea.

Then quickly he swam round
To the Vanity's port side
And up to his messmates
Full bitterly he cried,
"Oh, messmates, draw me up
For I'm drifting with the tide,
And I'm sinking in the Lowland,
Lowland, Low
Aye, I'm sinking in the Lowland Sea!"

Then his messmates drew him up,
But on the deck he died,
And they stitched him in his hammock
Which was so fair and wide,
And they lowered him overboard
And he drifted with the tide,
And he sank beneath the Lowland,
Lowland, Low
And he sank beneath the Lowland Sea.

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Roberto
Date: 24 Jul 04 - 02:18 PM

Ten recordings of the Golden Vanity (F.J. Child #286):

1. The Golden Vanity
Jez Lowe, A Selection from The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs, Fellside FECD47, registrazioni 1985, 1993 & 1994.

It's I've got a ship in the north country,
Down in the Lowlands low
An' I fear she may be took by the Spanish enemy,
As she sails on the Lowland sea,
As she sails in the Lowlands low.

And up then stepped a little cabin boy,
Down in the Lowlands low
Saying, What will you give me if I do them destroy,
And sink them in the Lowland sea,
And sink them in the Lowlands low?

Oh, I'll give you silver and likewise gold,
Down in the Lowlands low
And my only daughter for to be your bride,
If you'll sink them in the Lowland sea,
If you'll sink them in the Lowlands low.

Oh wrap me up in me black bear skin,
Down in the Lowlands low
And heave me overboard for to sink or to swim,
An' I'll sink them in the Lowland sea,
I'll sink them in the Lowlands low.

Now some was playing cards and the others playing dice,
Down in the Lowlands low
And the boy had an auger, bored two holes at once,
And he sunk them in the Lowland sea,
And he sunk them in the Lowlands low.

He leaned upon his breast and he swum back again,
Down in the Lowlands low
Saying, Master, take me up, for I'm sure I will be slain,
An' I've sunk her in the Lowland sea,
An' I've sunk her in the Lowlands low.

Oh, I'll not take you up,' the master he cried,
Down in the Lowlands low
'But I'll shoot you and I'll kill you and send you with the tide,
An' I'll drown you in the Lowland sea,
An' I'll drown you in the Lowlands low.

He leaned upon his breast and swum round the larboard side,
Down in the Lowlands low
O messmates, take me up for I fear I will be slain,
An' I've sunk her in the Lowland sea,
An' I've sunk her in the Lowlands low.

His messmates took him up, and on the deck he died,
Down in the Lowlands low
And they wrapped him up in an old cow's hide,
And they sunk him in the Lowland sea,
And sunk him in the Lowlands low.



2. The Golden Victory
Dodie Chalmers, on Classic Ballads of Britain and Ireland, Storytelling Ballads as included in Francis James Child's English & Scottish Popular Ballads, Volume 2, Rounder 11661-1776-2 (ballad recorded 1952)

There was a gallant ship
On yon western counterie
And the name of that ship
Was The Golden Victory
As she sailed upon the lowlands low

Out spoke the master
It's out spoke he:
Is there anyone on board
That will sink that ship for me
And plunge her in the lowlands low?

Out spoke the cabin boy
Out spoke he:
O master, dear master
What will you give to me
If I sink her in the lowlands low?

It's I will give thee silver
And I will give thee gold
Likewise my oldest daughter
So beautiful and bold
If you sink her in the lowlands low

The boy bent his back
And away he did swim
With a dagger in his hand
For to let the waters in
And sink her in the lowlands low

Some were playing dominoes
And some were playing cards
And the water rushing in
Gave them all a great surprise
For she's sinking in the lowlands low

Back swam the cabin boy
Back swum he -
O master, dear master
O please now take me in
She's sinking in the lowlands low

The master took him in
And packed him off to bed,
In less than half an hour
This poor cabin boy lay dead
And he sank her in the lowlands low



3. The Golden Vanity
Bill Cameron, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, on The Child Ballads No.2, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads Numbers 110-299, The Folk Songs of Britain Volume 5, Topic 12T 161

I had a little ship on the North Counteree
She went by the name of the Golden Vanity
But I was afraid she'd be taken by the Turkish enemy
As we sank her in the lowlands, the lowlands
And we sank her in the lowlands low

Then up comes a little cabin boy:
What would you give me the ships to destroy?
First I'd give you silver and then I'd give you gold
And you shall have me daughter when I get to the shore
So we sank her in the lowlands, the lowlands
We sank her in the lowlands low



4. The Golden Vanity
Johnny Doughty, on Hidden English, Topic TSCD600, ballad recorded in 1976

A fair ship is mine, called the Golden Vanity
And she sails just now by the North Country
But I fear that she'll be taken by a Spanish gallalee
As we sail by the lowlands low

By the lowlands low
As we sail by the lowlands low

What will you give to me – asked the little cabin boy
If I venture to that Spanish ship, the ship that doth annoy?
I will wreck the gallalee, you may peace of mind enjoy
As we sail by the lowlands low

By the lowlands low
As we sail by the lowlands low

The captain said – Now with you my lad I'll share
All my treasure and my wealth, you shall have my daughter fair
If this Spanish ship you nobly sink and ease me of my care
As we sail by the lowlands low

By the lowlands low
As we sail by the lowlands low

Then boldly the lad, did he leap into the sea
And an auger very sharp and thin he carried carefully
And he swam the mighty billows till he reached the gallalee
Where she sank by the lowlands low

By the lowlands low
Where she sank by the lowlands low

Then back to the ship the little hero hied
And he begged the crew to haul him up upon the larboard side
You can sink for me, you little dog - the ungrateful captain cried
As we sail by the lowlands low

Was there ever half a tale so sad as this tale of the sea
Where we sailed by the lowlands?

By the lowlands low
Where we sailed by the lowlands low?



5. The Golden Vanitee
Tony Rose, Young Hunting, Trailer LER 2013, 1970

There once was a captain who was boasting on the quay:
Oh I have a ship and a gallant ship is she
Of all the ships I know she is the best for me
And she's sailing in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
She's sailing in the lowlands low

Oh, well, I have her built in the North Counterie
And I have her christened The Golden Vanitee
I armed her and I manned her and I sent her off to sea
And she's sailing in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
She's sailing in the lowlands low

Oh well, then up stepped a sailor who had just returned from sea
Oh I was aboard of the Golden Vanitee
When she was held in chase by a Spanish piratee
And we sank 'em in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
We sank 'em in the lowlands low

Oh well, we had aboard of us a little cabin boy
Who said - What will you give me if the gallee I destroy
I'll give to you me daughter, she is me pride and joy
If you sink them in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
If you sink them in the lowlands low

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
He swam until he came to the rascal pirate's side
He climbed on board, he went below, by none was he espied
And he sank them in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
He sank them in the lowlands low

Oh well, he bore with his auger, he bore once and twice
And some was playing cards and some was playing dice
But when he let the water in, it dazzled at their eyes
And he sank them in the lowlands
In the lowlands, lowlands
He sank them in the lowlands low

Oh yes, some was playing cards and some was playing dice
And some was in their hammocks a-sporting with their wives
But when he let the water in, it pulled out all their lives
And he sank them in the lowlands
In the lowlands, lowlands
He sank them in the lowlands low

So then the cabin boy he swam unto the larboard side
Saying - Captain take me up for I am drowning in the tide
I'll shoot you and I'll kill you if you claim me child as bride
And I'll sink you in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
I'll sink you in the lowlands low

So then the cabin boy he swam unto the starboard side
Saying – Messmates take me up for I am drifting with the tide
They took him up so quickly but when on deck he died
And they buried him in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
They buried him in the lowlands low

Oh yes, they took him up so quickly but when on deck he died
And they sewed him in his hammock that was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer over him and dropped him in the tide
And they sailed from the lowlands low
From the lowlands, lowlands
They sailed from the lowlands low

Well here's a curse onto the Captain wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin boy so far away to sea
And to leave him in the lowlands low
In the lowlands, lowlands
To leave him in the lowlands low



6. The Old Virginia Lowlands
Brass Monkey, Sound & Rumour, vocals by Martin Carthy and John Kirkpatrick, Topic TSCD501

Once there was a skipper he was boasting on the quay
Saying - I have a ship and a gallant ship is she
Oh I have a ship and a gallant ship is she
Of all the ships that I do know she's far the best to me

In the old Virginia lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

Oh I had her built in the north country
And I had her christened the Golden Vanity
Oh I had her christened the Golden Vanity
I armed her and I manned her and I sent her off to sea

In the old Virginia lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

Then up spoke a sailor who had just returned from sea
Oh I served on board of the Golden Vanity
Oh I served on board of the Golden Vanity
When she was held in chase by a Spanish piratee

In the old Virginia lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

And we had on board of us a little cabin boy
Who said - What will you give me if the galleon I destroy
Oh what will you give me if the galleon I destroy
Oh you will get my daughter she is my pride and joy

If you sink them in the lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
And he swam and he swam to the rascal pirate's side
He swam and he swam to the rascal pirate's side
And he climbed on deck and he went below and none did him espy

And he sank them in the lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

He bore with his auger he bore once and twice
And some were playing cards and some were playing dice
The water it flowed in and it dazzled their eyes
The water it flowed in and it pulled out all their lives

And he sank them in the lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

Well he swam and he swam all to the starboard side
Saying - Captain take me up I am drifting with the tide
Oh Captain take me up - But so loud the Captain cried
I will sink you, I will kill you, you shall not have your bride

I will sink you in the lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

The shipmates took him up and on the deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They sewed him in his hammock it was so strong and wide
They prayed for him, they sang for him, they sunk him in the tide

In the old Virginia lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

My curse be on you Captain wherever you may be
My curse be on the Captain of the Golden Vanity
In waking and in sleeping until your dying day
For you gave your oath to him and you did him betray

In the old Virginia lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low

In the old Virginia lowlands
Lowlands low
In the old Virginia lowlands low



7. The Sweet Kumadee
Ewan MacColl, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads – vol.2, Folkways FG 3510, 1964

There was a ship sailed frae the north country
And the name of the ship was the Sweet Kumadee
She was built o' the pine and the bay oak tree
And she sailed on the Lowlands,Lowlands
And she sailed on the Lowlands low

We hadna been sailing a league but barely three
When the look-out man he sighted a French gaudie
And he said, We'll all be sent to the bottom o' the sea
As we sail on the Lowlands,Lowlands
As we sail on the Lowlands low

Then oot and spak our cabin-boy and oot spak he
Cryin', Captain, o captain,what will ye gie to me
If I swim alang the side o' the French gaudie
And sink her in the Lowlands,Lowlands
And sink her in the Lowlands low?

It's I will gi'e ye gowd and I will gi'e ye fee
And my eldest dochter your bride for to be
If ye'll swim along the side o' the French Gaudie
And sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
And sink her in the lowlands low

Ye'll row me into an auld bull's skin
Ye'll tak' me to the side and there ye'll throw me in
Wi' my instruments aboot me to the gaudie I will swim
And I'll sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
I'll sink her in the lowlands low!

The boy bent his back and awa' swam he
He swan till he cam' to the French Gaudie
Wi' his instruments aboot him, he started to mak' free
To sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
To sink her in the lowlands low

Some were at the cairds and some were at the dice
Four and twenty holes he has pierced in her side
Until the salt water it flashed before their eyes
And they sank in lowlands, lowlands
They sank in the lowlands low

O captain, O captain, be as guid as your word
You'll throw me a rope and ye'll pu' me on board
The gaudie she lies at the bottom of the road
She's lying in the lowlands, lowlands
She's lying in the lowlands low

I winna throw a rope or pu' ye on board
Ye can swim till ye sink, just as true as my word
Ye can swim till ye sink to the bottom of the road
Ye can sink in the lowlands, lowlands
Ye can sink in the lowlands low!

Ye'll throw me a rope and ye'll pu' me frae the sea
Or I'll swim to the side o' your Sweet Kumadee
And I'll send her to the bottom like the French Gaudie
That's lying on the lowlands, lowlands
That's lying on the lowlands low!

He's thrown to him a rope and they've pu'd him frae the sea
And he's gi'en to him the gowd and he's gi'en to him the fee
And his eldest dochter his bride for to be
As they sailed on the lowlands, lowlands;
As they sailed on the lowlands low



8. The Sweet Kumadie
Ian Manuel, The Dales of Caledonia, Topic 12TS301, 1976

There once was a ship sailed frae the north country
And the name of the ship was the Sweet Kumadie
She was built o' the pine and the bay oak tree
And she sailed on the Lowlands,Lowlands
And she sailed on the Lowlands low

Well, we hadna been sailing a league but barely three
When the look-out man he sighted a French gaudie
And he said - We'll all be sent tae the bottom o' the sea
As we sail on the Lowlands,Lowlands
As we sail on the Lowlands low

Well, it's oot and spak our cabin-boy, oot spak he
Cryin' - Captain, o captain,what will ye gie to me
If I swim alang the side o' your French gaudie
And I sink her in the Lowlands,Lowlands
And I sink her in the Lowlands low?

Oh, it's I'll gi'e ye gowd and I will gi'e ye fee
And my eldest dochter your bride for to be
Gin ye'll swim alang the side o' yon French Gaudie
And you sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
And you sink her in the lowlands low

The boy bent his back and awa' swam he
He swan till he cam' to the French Gaudie
And wi' his instruments aboot him, he started to mak' free
To sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
For to sink her in the lowlands low

Oh, some were at the cairds and some were at the dice
Four and twenty holes he has pierced in her side
Until the salt water, aye, it flashed before their eyes
And she sank in lowlands, lowlands
And she sank in the lowlands low

O captain, O captain, be as guid as your word
You'll throw me a rope and ye'll pu' me on board
For your gaudie, oh she lies at the bottom of the road
She lies in the lowlands, lowlands
Oh, she lies in the lowlands low

I'm not throwin' ye a rope or pu' ye on board
Ye can swim till ye sink, just as true as my word
Ye can swim till ye sink tae the bottom of the road
Ye can sink in the lowlands, lowlands
Ye can sink in the lowlands low!

Ye'll throw me a rope and ye'll pu' me frae the sea
Or I'll swim alang the side o' your Sweet Kumadie
And I'll send her to the bottom like your French Gaudie
And you'll sink on the lowlands, lowlands
And you'll sink on the lowlands low!

Oh, he's thrown him a rope and they've pu'd him frae the sea
He's gi'en to him the gowd and he's gi'en to him the fee
And his eldest dochter his bride for to be
As they sailed on the lowlands, lowlands;
As they sailed on the lowlands low



9. The Golden Vanity
Duncan Williamson, on Travellers' Tales, Volume 2, Songs, stories and ballads from Scottish Travellers, Gabrielle Ijdo, Stanley Robertson & Duncan Williamson, Kyloe 101, 2002

O I have a ship that sails on the sea
And she goes by the name of the Golden Vanity
But I'll doubt she'll by sunk by a Spanish Galee
As I sail round the lowlands low, low
As I sail round the lowlands low

Then up and spoke a cabin boy
A well-spoke lad was he
Saying – Captain, O captain, O what would you gi'e
If the Spanish Gallee would trouble you no more
As you sail round the lowlands low, low
As you sail round the lowlands low?

O guid gold I would give and silver in store
And my pretty little daughter who waits on the shore
If the Spanish Gallee would trouble me no more
As I sail round the lowlands low, low
As I sail round the lowlands low

O straight away the cabin boy bared his breast and dived in
He held in his hand an auger sharp and thin
He held in his hand an auger sharp and thin
He went swimming in the lowlands low, low
He went swimming in the lowlands low

Then he bored and he bored, he bored once or twice
For some was playing cards and some was playing dice
And the water it rushed in and dazzled till their eyes
And he sank 'em in the lowlands low, low
And he sank them in the lowlands low

Then he swam and he swam, crying – Captain, take me in
I am drowning in the lowlands low

O throw me a rope, a rope - cried he
A rope, O, a rope, you will never get from me
For you sunk the Dargle, the Turk of Admiree
Now she's lying in the lowlands low, low
Now she's lying in the lowlands low

So he swam around the starboard side, saying – Messmates, take me in
They throwed him a rope and his messmates took him in
And they wrapped him up in an old cow skin
And they sank him in the lowlands low, low
They sank him in the lowlands low



10. The Golden Vanity
Martyn Wyndham-Read, on Song Links, A celebration of English Traditional Songs and their Australian variants, Fellside FECD 176D

Now there once sailed a ship from the North Amerikee
The name that she went sailing by was the Golden Vanity
And she was a fine ship as she strolled along the deep
As she sailed along the lowlands, the lowlands
She sailed along the lowlands low

Now the first ship in sight was the Turkish Revelry
The captain he was frightened that they'd sink her in the sea
The captain he was frightened that they'd sink her in the sea
And that they'd send her to the lowlands, the lowlands
They'd send her to the bottom of the sea

Now the first that jumped up was the little sailor boy
Saying - Captain what will you give me if her I do destroy
I'll give you gold in store and my daughter when on shore
If you send her to the lowlands, the lowlands
You send her to the bottom of the sea

Well, he grabbed up the auger and overboard jumped he
He swam right and left for the Turkish Revelry
He bored nine holes in the bottom of the ship
And he sent her to the lowlands, the lowlands
And he sent her to the bottom of the sea

Now he swam back again to the Golden Vanity
Saying - Captain pick me up for I'm sinking in the sea
Captain pick me up for I'm drowning in the sea
And I'm going to the lowlands, the lowlands
I'm going to the bottom of the sea

Oh no, said the captain, that will never do
I'll shoot you or I'll stab you or I'll sink you in the sea
I'll shoot you or I'll stab you or I'll drown you in the sea
And I'll send you to the lowlands, the lowlands
I'll send you to the bottom of the sea

He said - Shipmates pick me up for I'm drowning in the sea
Shipmates pick me up for I'm drowning in the sea
Shipmates pick me up for I'm sinking in the sea
And I'm going to the lowlands, the lowlands
I'm going to the bottom of the sea

Well the shipmates picked him up, it was on he deck he died
They rolled him in his old grey shirt and sank him in the tide
They rolled him in his old grey shirt and sank him in the tide
And they sent him to the lowlands, the lowlands
They sent him to bottom of the sea

Now a curse on the captain wherever he may roam
For taking that poor sailor boy so far away from home
For taking that poor sailor boy so far away from home
And for sending him to the lowlands, the lowlands
For sending him to the bottom of the sea


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE GOLDEN WILLOW TREE etc.
From: Roberto
Date: 24 Jul 04 - 02:26 PM

Nine more recordings of the Golden Vanity (Child #286), American traditional singers, American folksingers and the folk-rock's by Steeleye Span. Roberto

11. THE GOLDEN WILLOW TREE
Justus Begley, on Anglo-American Ballads, Volume 2, Rounder CD 1516, original release for the Library of Congress; song recorded in 1937

There was a little ship in South Amerikee
Crying, O the land that lies so low
There was a little ship in South Amerikee
She went by the name of the Golden Wilow Tree
As she sailed in the lowland lonesome low
As she sailed in the lowland so low

We hadn't been a-sailing more than two weeks or three
Crying, O the land that lies so low
We hadn't been a-sailing more than two weeks or three
Till we came in sight of the British Roverie
As she sailed in the lowland lonesome low
As she sailed in the lowland so low

Up stepped a little carpenter boy
Crying, O the land that lies so low
Up stepped a little carpenter boy
Says - What will you give me for the ship that I'll destroy?
And I'll sink 'em in the lowland lonesome low
And I'll sink 'em in the lowland so low

I'll give you gold or I'll give thee
Crying, O the land that lies so low
I'll give you gold or I'll give thee
The fairest of rny daughters as she sails upon the sea
If you'll sink 'em in the lowland so low
If you'll sink them in the land that lies so low

Then he turned upon his back and away swam he
Crying, O the land that lies so low
He turned upon his back and away swam he
He swum till he came to the British Roverie
As she sailed in the lowland lonesome low
As she sailed in the lowland so low

He had a little instrument fitted for his use
Crying, O the land that lies so low
He had a little instrument fitted for his use
He bore nine holes and he bore them all at once
And he sank her in the lowland lonesome low
And he sank her in the lowland so low

Well, he turned upon his breast and back swum he
Crying, O the land that lies so low
He turned upon his breast and back swum he
He swum till he came to the Golden Willow Tree
As she sailed in the lowland lonesome low
As she sailed in the lowland so low

Captain, O Captain, come take me on board
Crying, O the land that lies so low
O Captain, O Captain, come take me on board
And do unto me as good as your word
For I sank 'em in the lowland lonesome low
I sank her in the lowland so low

Oh, no, I won't take you on board
Crying, O the land that lies so low
Oh, no, I won't take you on board
Nor do unto you as good as my word
Though you sank 'em in the lowland lonesome low
Though you sank 'em in the lowland so low

If it wasn't for the love that I have for your men
Crying, O the land that lies so low
If it wasn't for the love that I have for your men
I'd do unto you as I done unto them
I'd sink you in the lowland lonesome low
I'd sink you in the lowland so low

He turned upon his head and down swum he
Crying, O the land that lies so low
He turned upon his head and down swum he
He swum till he came to the bottom of the sea
Sank himself in the lowland lonesome low
Sank himself in the lowland so low



12. A Ship Set Sail For North America
Ollie Jacobs, on Child Ballads Traditional in the United States II, edited bt Bertrand H. Bronson, Long-Playing Records AAFS L58; song recorded in 1941

A ship set sail for North America
And she went by the name of the Turkish Revelee
As she sailed along the lonesome lowlands low
As she sailed along the lowlands sea

There was another ship in the North Country
And she went by the name of the Golden Willow Tree
As she sailed upon the lonesome lowlands low
As she sailed upon the lowlands sea

Captain, oh captain, what will you give me
If I overtake her and sink her in the sea
If I'll sink her in the lonesome lowlands low
If I'll sink her in the lowlands sea

I have a house and I have land
And I have a daughter that will be at your command
If you'll sink her in the lonesome lowlands low
If you'll sink her in the lowlands sea

I have a little tool just fitted for the use
Pouring for salt water and letting in the slews
As she sails upon the lonesome lowlands low
As she sails upon the lowlands sea

He fell upon his back and away swam he
Until he overtaken the Golden Willow Tree
As she sailed along the lonesome lowlands low
As she sailed along the lowlands sea

Some with their hats and some with their caps
Trying to stop the salt water gaps
As she sailed along the lonesome lowlands low
As she sailed along the lowlands sea

He fell upon his back and away swam he
Until he overtaken the Turkish Revelee
As she sailed along the lonesome lowlands low
As she sailed along the lowlands sea

Captain, o captain, take me on board
And be to me as good as your word
For I've sunk her in the lonesome lowlands low
For I've sunk her in the lowlands sea

Neither will I take you on board
Nor be to you as good as my word
Though you've sunk her in the lonesome lowlands low
Though you've sunk her in the lowlands sea

If it wasn't for the love I have for your men
I would serve you as I've served them
I would sink you in the lonesome lowlands low
I would sink you in the lowlands sea



13. Merry Golden Tree
Almeda Riddle, on Ozark Frontier, Southern Journey Vol.7, The Aalan Lomax Collection, Rounder CD 1707, ballad recorded in 1959

There was a little ship that sailed upon the sea
And the name of that ship was the Merry Golden Tree
A-sailing on the low and lonesome low
A-sailing on the low and lonesome lowland sea

Now she hadn't been out but a week, two or three
Until she sighted the British Robbery
A-sailing on the low and lonesome low
A-flaunting the Jolly Roger on the lowland sea

Up stepped the captain, wringing of his hands
A-saying - O Lord and what will we do?
They will sink us in this low and lonesome low
They're going to sink us to the bottom of this lonely sea

A boy then said - O Captain, Captain, what will you give to me
If I just sink this British Robbery?
I'll sink her in the low and lonesome low
I'll sink 'em to the bottom of the lonesome sea

Now it's I'd have wealth and I would have fame
And ever true to my word I have been
If you II sink them in the low and lonesome sea
If you'll sink them in the lonesome sea

I'll give to you wealth, I'll give to you fame
My youngest daughter and you shall married be
If you II sink 'em in the low and lonesome low
If you'll sink 'em to the bottom of the lowland sea

Then he picked up a tool, and jumped overboard
He said - I'll be as good as my word
He was swimming in the low and lonesome low
He went swimming oer the lonesome lowland sea

Then he took his little tool, just made for that use
And he made twelve holes just to let in the juice
She was sinking in the low and lonesome low
She was sinking in the lonesome lowland sea

Sailors off'ed with their coats and some with their caps
They were trying to fill up the salt water gaps
They were sinking in the low and lonesome sea
They were sinking to the bottom of the lonely sea

Then he turned around, and away swam he
Until he came back to the Merry Golden Tree
A-swimming in the low and lonesome low
Still swimming in the lonesome lowland sea

O Captain, are you as good as your word?
Then take this poor sailor man on board
For I'm drownding in this low and lonesome low
I'm a drownding in this lonesome lowland sea

I will not give you wealth, nor give you fame
My youngest daughter has a time-honored name
I'll just leave you in this low and lonesome low
I'll leave you drownding here in this lonely sea

If it was not for your daughter and you being such a man
I'd do, Sir, to you just what I did to them
I'd sink you in this low and lonesome low
I'd sink you to the bottom of this lonely sea

But he turned on his back, and away floated he
Sayin - Fare you well my Merry Golden Tree
I'm drownding in this low and lonesome low
I'm drownding in this lonely lowland sea



14. The Merry Golden Tree
Jean Ritchie, Child Ballads in America, Volume 1, Folkways Records F-2301, 1961

There was a little ship and she sailed upon the sea
And she went by the name of The Merry Golden Tree
As she sailed upon the low and the lonesome low
As she saile'd upon the lonesome sea

There was another ship and she sailed upon the sea
And she went by the name of The Turkish Robbery
As she sailed upon the low and the lonesome low
As she sailed upon the lonesome sea

There was a little cabin boy upon the Golden Tree
Said - Captain, oh Captain, what will you give to me
If I sink then in the low and the lonesome low
If I sink them in the lonesome sea?

Oh a half of my ship shall be made unto thee
And my youngest daughter shall be wed unto thee
If you sink them in the low and the lonesome low
If you sink them in the lonesome sea

He bowed upon his breast and away swum he
Till he come to the ship called The Turkish Robbery
Gonna sink you in the low and the lonesome low
Gonna sink you in the lonesome sea

Then out of his pocket an instrument he drew
And he bored nine holes for to let that water through
For to sink them in the low and the lonesome low
For to sink them in the lonesome sea

(Oh some had hats and some had caps
And they tried for to stop these ferverish water gaps
But he sunk them in the low and the lonesome low
But he sunk them in the lonesome sea

He bowed upon his breast and back swum he
Till he come to the ship called The Merry Golden Tree
As she sailed upon the low and the lonesome low
As she sailed on the lonesome sea

Oh captain, oh captain, pray draw me up on board
Oh captain, oh captain, pray give me my reward
For I've sunk them in the low and the lonesome low
For I've sunk them in the lonesome sea

I'll never draw you up on board
No I've never known a cabinboy to gain such reward
Though you sunk them in the low and the lonesome low
Though you sunk them in the lonesome sea

If it weren't for the love of your daughter and your men
I would do unto you what I've done unto them
I would sink you in the low and the lonesome low
I would sink you in the lonesome sea

He bowed upon his breast and down sunk he
Farewell, farewell to The Merry Golden Tree
For I'm sinkin' in the low and the lonesome low
For I'm sinkin' in the lonesome sea)



15. The Turkish Rebelee
Horton Barker, on Virginia Traditions, Ballads from British Tradition, Global Village CD 1002, ballad recorded in 1939

There was a little ship and she sailed on the sea
And the name of the ship was The Turkish Rebelee
She sailed on the lonely lonesome water
She sailed on the lonesome sea

Up stepped a little sailor, saying – What'll you give to me
To sink that ship to the bottom of the sea
If I'll sink her in the lonely lonesome water
If I'll sink her in the lonesome sea?

I have a house ad I have lands
And I have a daughter that shall be at your command
If you'll sink her in the lonely lonesome water
If you'll sink her in the lonesome sea

He bowed on his breast and away swam he
He swam till he came to the Turkish Rebelee
He sank her in the lonely lonesome water
He sank her in the lonesome sea

Some had hats and some had caps
A-trying to stop the salt water gaps
For she sank in the lonely lonesome water
She sank in the lonesome sea

Some a-playing cards and some a shooting dice
And every stood around a-giving good advice
As she sank in the lonely lonesome water
As she sank in the lonesome sea

He bowed on his breast and away swam he
He swam till he came to the Golden Willow Tree:
I've sunk her in the lonely lonesome water
I've sunk her in the lonesome sea!

Now captain, will you be as good as your word
Or eather will you take me in on board?
I've sunk her in the lonely lonesome water
I've sunk her in the lonesome sea

No I won't be as good as my word
And neither will I take you in on board
'Though you've sunk her in the lonely lonesome water
'Though you've sunk her in the lonesome sea

If it were not for the love I have for your men
I'd do unto you just as I've done unto them
I'd sink in the lonely lonesome water
I'd sink you in the lonesome sea

He bowed on his breast and down sank he
A-bidding farewell to the Golden Willow
He sank in the lonely lonesome water
He sank in the lonesome sea



16. The Turkish Revelee
Paul Clayton, Whaling & Sailing Songs, Tradition TCD 1064, recorded in 1956, original lp release: Whaling and Sailing Songs from the days of Moby Dick TLP 1005 (from Horton Barker's version)

There was a little ship and she sailed on the sea
And the name of our ship was The Turkish Revelee
O she sailed out in that lonely lonesome water
O she sailed on the lonesome sea

Up stepped a little sailor, saying – What'll you give to me
To sink that ship in the bottom of the sea
If I'll sink her in that lonely lonesome water
If I'll sink her in the lonesome sea?

I have a house ad I have land
And I have a daughter that shall be at your command
If you'll sink her in that lonely lonesome water
If you'll sink her in the lonesome sea

He bowed on his breast and away swam he
And he swam till he came to the Turkish Revelee
As she sailed out in that lonely lonesome water
As she sailed on the lonesome sea

He had a little ... all made for the bore
And he bored nine holes in the bottom of the floor
O he sank her in that lonely lonesome water
O he sank her in the lonesome sea

He bowed on his breast and away swam he
And he swam till he came to the Golden Willow Tree
As she sailed in that lonely lonesome water
As she sailed in the lonesome sea

Captain, o captain, will you be as good as your word
Or either take me up on board
For I've sunk her in that lonely lonesome water
O I've sunk her in the lonesome sea

No I won't be as good as my word
Nor neither will I take you up on board
'Though you've sunk her in the lonely lonesome water
'Though you've sunk her in the lonesome sea

If it weren't for the love that I bear unto your men
I'd sink you the same just as I sank them
O I'd sink in that lonely lonesome water
O I'd sink you in the lonesome sea

He bowed on his breast and down sank he
A-bidding farewell to the Golden Willow
O he sank in that lonely lonesome water
O he sank in the lonesome sea



17. Sinking in the Lonesone Sea
The Carter Family, Can The Circle Be Unbroken – The Original Carter Family, Country Music's First family, Columbia/Legacy CK 65707, ballad recorded in 1935

There was a little ship and she sailed upon the sea
And she went by the name of the Merry Golden Tree
As she sailed upon the low and lonesome low
As she sailed upon the lonesome sea

There was a little sailor unto his captain said:
Oh, Captain, Captain, what'll you give to me
If I sink them in the low and lonesome low
If I sink them in the lonesome sea?

Two hundred dollars I will give unto thee
And my oldest daughter I'll wed unto you
If you'll sink them in the low and lonesome low
If you'll sink them in the lonesome sea


He bowed upon his breast and away swam he
Till he came to the ship of the Turkish Revilee
And she sailed upon the low and lonesome low
She sailed upon the lonesome sea

If it wasn't for the love of your daughter and your men
I would do unto you as I did unto them
I would sink you in the low and lonesome low
I would sink you in the lonesome sea

He bowed his head, and down sank he -
Farewell, farewell to the Merry Golden Tree
For I'm sinking in the low and lonesome low
For I'm sinking in the lonesome sea



18. The Golden Vanity
Jody Stecher, Going Up On the Mountain, The Classic First Recordings, Acoustic Disc ACD-39, 2000, recording made in the 70s.

There was a little ship and she sailed upon the sea
And the name of our ship was The Golden Vanity
And she sailed upon the low and lonesome low
Sailed upon the lonesome sea

She had not been out but two weeks or three
When she was overtaken by the Turkish Revelee
As she sailed upon the low and lonesome low
She sailed upon the lonesome sea

Then up spake our little cabin boy
Saying – What will you give to me if I do them destroy
If I sink them in the low and lonesome low
If I sink them in the lonesome sea?

Well, the man that them destroys – our captain then replied
Ten thousand pounds and my daughter for his bride
If you sinks them in the low and lonesome low
If you sinks them in the lonesome sea

Then he leaned upon his breast and out jumped he
He swum till he come to the Turkish Revelee
As she sailed upon the low and lonesome low
Sailed upon the lonesome sea

He had a little tool that was made for the use
He bored nine holes in her hull all at once
He sunk her in the low and lonesome low
Sunk her in the lonesome sea

Captain, pick me up – our cabin boy he cried
O Captain, pick me up for I'm weary with the tide
And I am sinking in the low and lonesome low
Sinking in the lonesome sea

I will not pick you up – our captain then replied
I'll shoot you, I'll drown you, I'll sink you in the tide
I'll sink you in the low and lonesome low
Sink you in the lonesome sea

They picked him up and on the deck he died
O they wrapped him in his hammock that was so long and wide
As we sailed upon the low and lonesome low
As we sailed upon the lonesome sea

Yes, they wrapped him in his hammock, it was so long and wide
Throwed him overboard and he drifted down the tide
And it sank to the low and lonesome low
Sank to the lonesome sea



19. The Golden Vanity
Steeleye Span, recorded it in 1995 during the Time recording sessions, but released on the Park Records samplers The Best of Britsh Folk Rock and A Stroll Through the Park

Oh, I have a ship in the north country
Down in the Lowlands low
And I fear she may be took by the Spanish enemy
Down in the lowland sea

Up on the deck stepped a little cabin boy
Down in the lowlands low
Saying, What will you give me if I do them destroy
And I sink them in the lowland sea?

Oh, I'll give you silver an' I will give you gold
Down in the lowlands low
And my only daughter for to be your bride
if you sink them in the lowland sea
Sink them in the lowlands low

Lowlands low
Lowland sea

Oh wrap me up in my black bear skin
Down in the lowlands low
And throw me overboard for to sink or to swim
An' I'll sink them in the lowland sea

Now some were playing cards and others playing dice
Down in the lowlands low
And the boy he had an auger and he bored two holes at once
And he sunk them in the lowland sea

He leaned upon his breast and he swam back again
Down in the lowlands low
Saying, Master, take me up, for I'm sure I will be slain
And I sunk them in the lowland sea
I sunk them in the lowlands low

Lowlands low
Lowland sea
Lowlands low
Lowland sea

Oh, I'll not take you up, the master he cried
Down in the lowlands low
But I'll shoot you and I'll kill you and I'll send you with the tide
And I'll drown you in the lowland sea

He leaned upon his breast and he swam to the larboard side
Down in the lowlands low
Saying - Messmates, take me up for I fear I have been slain
And I sunk them in the lowland sea

They took him up and on the deck he died
Down in the lowlands low
And they wrapped him up in an old cow's hide
And they sunk him in the lowland sea,
They sunk him in the lowlands low

Lowlands low
Lowland sea…


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Jul 04 - 02:48 PM

Roberto has opened Pandora's box- many of these versions, I think, were scattered or referred to in the various threads on this song.

The version posted by Amos is essentially the same as the one in "Rise Up Singing," (The Sing Out! Songbook) and some previous issues of Sing Out!.

It is a simple telling that is easy to put across to an audience, and would be a worthwhile addition to the DT. I am afraid that it will be lost in the flood of versions now in this thread, and I think it unfortunate hat the thread started by Amos was precipitately closed.

Lacking in this plethora of versions of Child 286 are those on which these revisions are based; particularly those in Bronson, "The Singing Tradition....," which are listed under the title "The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)." This is unfortunate, since in these are found ideas that singers could refer to as they made up versions suited to their individual style.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: La Vera Verda Mar'
From: Haruo
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 11:28 PM

I have put the Esperanto version La Vera Verda Stel' in La Lilandejo:

La Vera Verda Stel'

The Golden Vanity

anonima, tradicia, angla markanto
Esperantigis : ROS' Haruo

  1. Sur la verda mar' velis alta karavel',
    Kaj nomiĝis tiu ŝipo la Vera Verda Stel',
    Kaj minacis ĝin piratoj de l' Idisma fi-kartel'
    Dum ĝi velis sur la verda, verda, verda,
         ĝi velis sur la verda mar'.
  2. Ekparolis ŝipa knab' dekjaraĝa (pli-malpli),
    Kaj li diris, "Ho ŝipestro, kio estos la premi'
    Se l' piratan malamikon ruze kaŝ-alnaĝos mi
    Kaj sinkigos ĝin en verda, verda, verda,
         sinkigos en la verda mar'?"
  3. "Per oro kaj arĝento mi rekompencos vin,
    Kaj la belan filineton vi havos por edzin'
    Se vi naĝos al la ŝip' kaj vi submarigos ĝin
    Dum ĝi velas sur la verda, verda, verda,
         ĝi velas sur la verda mar'.
  4. Sin pretigis do la knab' kaj impetis tra la mar',
    Kaj li naĝis ĝis la ŝipo de l' pirata Idistar',
    Kaj li per aleno akra boris truojn tri aŭ kvar,
    Kaj sinkigis ĝin en verda, verda, verda,
         sinkigis en la verda mar'.
  5. Kaj renaĝis al la Vera Verda Stelo la knabet'.
    "Min eltiru, ho ŝipestro!" venis laŭte lia pet',
    Sed la estro lin ignoris, domaĝante pri la vet',
    Kaj lin lasis en la verda, verda, verda,
         lin lasis en la verda mar'.
  6. Aŭdinte liajn kriojn, maristoj kaj maat'
    Lin eltiris sur ferdekon pro dankemo kaj kompat',
    Sed li mortis, kaj por ĉerko al li servis la boat',
    Kaj por tombo ja la verda,. verda, verda,
         por tombo ja la verda mar.

I'm rather fond of it.

Haruo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Mr Happy
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 11:28 AM

This version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSCN8HuFCcE
is one I'm used to, but round these parts it's known by both names


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Mr Happy
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 11:32 AM

Meant to say, its the chorus part that's most familiar


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Haruo
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 07:58 PM

The demise of Geocities put an end to the bulk of my two main websites, La Lilandejo and TTT-Himnaro Cigneta, both of which were extensively linked to in various Mudcat threads, but I still have the contents and intend to reestablish both sites in a more secure location at some future date. At the moment I'm fully preoccupied with buying a house. Most of the HTML contents are at www.archive.org, as well as at least some of the graphics. MIDI files, however, seem not to have been archived there.

La Vera Verda Stel''s text is at http://web.archive.org/web/20050527012219/http://geocities.com/lilandr/kantoj/diversaj/LaVeraVerdaStel1.htm; if anyone needs the MIDI feel free to PM me.

Haruo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Mysha
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 09:53 PM

Hi,

You might want to try Reocities, the project to resurrect Geocities as it was when Yahoo! pulled the plug.
Eg. http://reocities.com/lilandr/kantoj/diversaj/LaVeraVerdaStel1.htm.

I wonder if De Noordzee is within the scope of this thread.

Bye,
                                                                  Mysha


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,Georgina Boyes
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 05:12 AM

To sort out a minor point from a 1999 (!) posting on Sir Walter Raleigh. He was executed, but not by hanging. As was invariably the case for someone of his social standing at the time - he was beheaded.

Georgina


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,OldNicKilby
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 08:58 AM

Interesting Georgina that I have a version of the Golden Vanity from an ancestor of mine who was born in Mowsely, where you did a lovely evening with"Voice of the People" last week .. It was collected in Vermont in the early part of the last century.
P S Why were we barred from joining in choruses ? Seems a bit of a contadiction with V o P


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: RTim
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 10:15 AM

Hi all,
I just looked in the Roud Index for variants of The Golden Vanity.
There are 431 references in the catalogue! So pick the bones out of that.

Tim Radford


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Acme
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 02:22 PM

I'm glad this thread came back up to the top. Great stuff here!

After my father died in 1997, a friend set up a song circle potluck celebration of life, and we all requested or sang songs, many of them favorites of Dad's. My sister and I debated which song we would each request, so I chose Golden Vanity as one he learned very early in his folk career and that everyone would know to sing along. That night with all of the diverse songs and remarks it became so clear how important his collection was, so I late that night I went out to his house and packed up all of his books, tapes, and LPs to put them immediately in safe storage.

When I was preparing the house to sell a few weeks later I stood in the empty front room, feeling that loneliness that comes when you move all personal effects from a space. I remember speaking out loud that I wished there was a sign that something of him was still around. At that moment I noticed the corner of a book on the shelf I was sure I'd completely emptied. I reached up and found the Penguin book of English Folksongs (mentioned earlier in the thread). I gently leafed the pages and it opened automatically to The Golden Vanity.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Haruo
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 03:04 PM

Thanks, Mysha, for the Reocities link. It's not clear to me if this is editable, or how or by whom, but as an archive of things as they were at the end of time this is better than archive.org, in that at least it has (as far as I can see) all the graphics and sound files.

Haruo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 08:24 PM

Thanks for posting my link, Mr.Happy! That one came straight from Stan Hugill's book; no oral/aural learning involved on my part.

I know we are generally talking about Golden Vanity as a text, but it is interesting as well how many chanteys (that happens to be the world I'm working in) start with the same melodic figure. "High Barbaree: and "Derby Ram" (again, both in their chantey forms) are two that come to mind.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Brian Peters
Date: 01 Dec 09 - 05:37 AM

A different version here, from the J M Carpenter MS, collected from a sailor in Cardiff Bay in 1929.

Interested in your comment, Gibb Sahib. I sing both the 'Derby Ram' and 'High Barbary' from Colcord, and they do indeed have the same opening musical phrase as my 'Golden Vanity'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,Ian Gill
Date: 01 Dec 09 - 06:42 AM

As well as on 'Young Hunting' there is a terrific live version of 'Golden Vanitee'on 'Exe' by Tony Rose [Chuddleigh Roots CR 003]. It was recorded by Ed Haber at the Eagle Tavern in NYC, 1981, so the sleeve notes say. Tony's introductions alone are worth the price of this CD - it's wonderful.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Apr 10 - 04:29 PM

The Golden China Tree
Library of Congress 1740AI, Indiana

There was a little ship,
It sailed upon the sea;
The name of that ship was the Golden China Tree.
As she sailed on the lone, lonesome low.
As she sailed on the lonesome sea.

With music, "The Golden Vanity," Anglo-American Ballad, transcribed by B. Nettl.
The complete song was not included by Bruno Nettl, p. 67, Folk Music in the United States, an Introduction, Wayne State Univ. Press, 3rd. Ed., 1976.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,bill S from Melbourne
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 07:00 AM

Only one reference to the version that topped the charts, the first folksong I owned on a record though the B-side "My old Man's a Dustman" is probably more well remembered and has entered the tradition as a singalong.
Bill


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Stewie
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 10:41 AM

Barbara Dane's rendition will withstand the test of time. Wonderful!

--Stewie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Goose Gander
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 11:07 AM

This one has become my favorite version . .

TURKISH REVILLIE

As sung by Jack Little, Osceola, Arkansas on August 19, 1959

There was a fine ship started out on th sea
Cryin', O th lonesome low
There was a fine ship started out on th sea
She went by th name of th Green Willow Tree
While sailin' in th low lands, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

She had'nt been on sea more than a week or three
Cryin', O th lonesome low
She had'nt been on sea more than a week or three
When she was over taken by th Turkish Revillie
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

Up stepped th captain, what shall we do
Cryin', O th lonesome low
Up stepped th captain, what shall we do
She'll over take us, cut us intwo
She'll sink us in th low land, lonesome low
She'll sink us in th low land sea

Up stepped th cabin boy, what'll you give me
Cryin', O th lonesome low
Up stepped th cabin boy, what'll you give me
If I'll go an' sink that Turkish Revillie
I'll sink 'er in th low land, lonesome low
I'll sink 'er in th low land sea

O, it's I'll give you gold an' it's I'll give to thee
Cryin', O th lonesome low
O, it's I'll give you gold an' it's I'll give to thee
My eldest daughter, thy wedded wife to be
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

He fell upon his breast an' away swam he
Cryin', O th lonesome low
He fell upon his breast an' away swam he
He set his course for th Turkish Revillie
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

He dived underneath an' 'e went to his work
Cryin', O th lonesome low
He dived underneath an' 'e went to his work
He bored nine holes an' he bored 'em in a jerk
He sank 'er in th low land, lonesome low
He sank 'er in th low land sea

He fell upon his breast an' away swam he
Cryin', O th lonesome low
He fell upon his breast an' away swam he
He set his course for th Green Willow Tree
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

Captain, O captain, won't you take me on board
Cryin', O th lonesome low
Captain, O captain, won't you take me on board
An' won't you be as good as your word
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

No kind sir, I won't take you on board
Cryin', O th lonesome low
No kind sir, I won't take you on board
Neither will I be as good as my word
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

If it was'nt for respect that I have for your crew
Cryin', O th lonesome low
If it was'nt for respect that I have for your crew
I'd take time an' I 'd sink you too
I'd sink you in th low land, lonesome low
I'd sink you in th low land sea

He fell upon his breast an' away swam he
Cryin', O th lonesome low
He fell upon his breast an' away swam he
He bid farewell to th Green Willow Tree
While sailin' in th low land, lonesome low
While sailin' in th low land sea

SOURCE:
Max Hunter collection


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 11:18 AM

Horton Barker's version has one of the most visual lines to be found in any folk song.

"Some a-playing cards and some a shooting dice
And every stood around a-giving good advice"

Anybody who has worked in a factory and watched their workmates playing cards or dominoes at lunchtime knows exactly what this means.
Sums up the genius of ballad-making for me totally.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,Hilary
Date: 23 Jan 11 - 07:00 PM

Does anyone know if a tune still exists for a version that actually mentions Sir Walter Raleigh? And, if so, where might I find it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add:The Golden Vanity
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 18 Feb 11 - 10:12 AM

THE GOLDEN VANITY

A ship I have got in the North Country
And she goes by the name of the Golden Vanity,
I fear she will be taken by a Spanish Ga-la-lie,
As she sails by the Low-lands low.

To the Captain then up spake the little Cabin-boy,
He said, What is my fee, if the galley I destroy,
The Spanish Ga-la-lie, if no more it shall annoy,
As you sail by the Low-lands low?

Of silver and gold I will give to you a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well, I'll give to thee galore,
As we sail by the Low-lands low.

Then the boy bared his breast, and straightway leaped in.
And he held all in his hand an augur sharp and thin,
And he swam until he came to the Spanish Galleon,
As she lay by the Low-lands low.

He bored with the augur, he bored once and twice,
And some were playing cards, and some were playing dice,
When the water flowed in it dazzl-ed their eyes,
And she sank by the Low-lands low,

So the Cabin-boy did swim all to the larboard side,
Saying Captain! take me in, I am drifting with the tide!
I will shoot you! I will kill you! the cruel Captain cried,
You may sink by the Low-lands low.

Then the Cabin-boy did swim all to the starboard side,
Saying, Messmates, take me in, I am drifting with the tide!
Then they laid him on the deck, and he closed his eyes and died.
As they sailed by the Low lands low.

They sewed his body up, all in an old cow's hide,
And they cast the gallant Cabin-boy over the ship's side,
And left him without more ado adrifting with the tide,
And to sink by the Low-ands low.

NP


Having searched for this by both title, and distinctive line. This version appears not to be in the DT
This version is from:
"English Folk-Songs for Schools" (Curwen Edition 6051)
collected and arranged by S Baring Gould, M.A. and Cecil J. Sharp, B.A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Brian Peters
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 10:56 AM

"Does anyone know if a tune still exists for a version that actually mentions Sir Walter Raleigh? And, if so, where might I find it?"

The only version that mentions Rawleigh (sic) - and then only as the ship-builder, not a protagonist - is Child's A version, a broadside from the Pepys collection of the late 17th century (whoever wrote the Wikipedia entry dates the original broadside around 1635). Apparently there was a tune specified: 'The Sailing of the Low-Lands', but since Bertrand Bronson was unable to find it, I doubt whether you or I would stand much chance.

Incidentally, this early version specifies 'The Neatherlands' as the location of the events, before reverting to 'The Lowlands' in later verses.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Lighter
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 11:03 AM

In the 1920's Robert Gordon received an American text in which the ship was the "bold Tennessee."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: SINSULL
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 11:08 AM

John Roberts does a version with the boy getting his revenge by sinking the Weeping Willow Tree and drowning all aboard. He survives to tell the tale.

That ship built in the Lowlands
Low low low
Born to ride the waves
Heigh Ho


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Brian Peters
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 11:30 AM

And what about the one in which the enemy vessel is the dreaded 'Turkish Roving Canoe'??


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 07:50 PM

Apropos Sir Walter Raleigh: I have in my head the first verse of a version that mentions him but isn't the Child A version.

Sir Walter Raleigh has built him a ship
In the Netherlands.
She was built of the pine and the brave oak tree
But we feared she might be taken by the Spanish enemy,
Sailing in the lowlands low.

I'll try to trace who I heard that from.

While I'm here, I'll throw in a reminder of this thread Gold.Vanity. Can you REALLY sink a ship?

Richard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 08:33 PM

Bronson includes 211 versions (with tunes)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Brian Peters
Date: 25 Mar 11 - 05:49 AM

"Apropos Sir Walter Raleigh: I have in my head the first verse of a version that mentions him but isn't the Child A version.

I'll try to trace who I heard that from."

Yes, please do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 25 Mar 11 - 08:03 AM

Brian,

Well, I've found the recording that I was looking for. The singer is Roy Harris.

The opening verse is partly but not entirely as I remembered it, and the tune is about the same; so I think what was in my head must have been a blend of his version with at least one other version – not surprising when so many versions have been collected and a good few of them have entered the Revival.

Roy's version starts with
    Sir Walter Raleigh built a ship
    In the Netherlands.
and the ship is the Sweet Trinity, as in Child A.

However this version is substantially different from Child A, so I suspect he put it together on the basis of Child A.

Are you able to contact him to enquire?

Richard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Brian Peters
Date: 25 Mar 11 - 08:06 AM

Funnily enough I spent an afternoon at Roy's house in Cardiff only last Monday. I need to email him to thank him and Elaine for their hospitality, so will ask about that version then. I've probably got that record myself somewhere!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 04:51 PM

Brian said
> I've probably got that record myself somewhere!

There may be a record, but my recording is my own from one of Roy's visits to the Herga Folk Club.

Richard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 05:44 PM

roy is a member here, name of burl.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 05:48 PM

Roy's version starts with
Sir Walter Raleigh built a ship
In the Netherlands.
and the ship is the Sweet Trinity, as in Child A.

Sounds very like the version sung by John Faulkner and Sandra Kerr on their 'John and Sandra' Argo LP (circa 1969)
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 05:52 PM

here is an unusual version, it is a shadow of the original carter family[which seems hard to locate] version however.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 05:53 PM

er it is
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eydz4l07jl8


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 05:58 PM

this is better
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-ezyv6Ymuk


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 06:35 PM

raymond crooke [above video] has the balance right between his voice and guitar, furthermore he can project his voice and his diction is good, and he keeps his accompaniment how it should be [accompaniment and simple], so that it does not distract from the singing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 24 Apr 11 - 12:18 PM

Both of those singers spend a lot of time not singing, with just the "accompaniment" going on; which isn't at all my cup of tea. I was about to apologise for serious thread drift, but it occurs to me that the various treatments by different singers emphasise how popular this song still is.

Getting back closer to the subject: the different endings to the story also seem noteworthy.

In some versions, the boy is left in the sea to drown. In some, his messmates rescue him but he then dies on the deck. In some he threatens to sink his own ship, whereupon the captain decides to honour his promises. And there's at least one version where the boy does sink his own ship and somehow (unexplained) survives to reach land and tell his tale, while the captain and the rest of the crew drown.

Brian, Did you find out from Roy about his version? Was it from John Faulkner and Sandra Kerr?

Richard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Brian Peters
Date: 12 May 11 - 05:42 AM

Richard - I finally got round to asking Roy about that version you recorded. He thinks he heard it originally from someone in the Critics Group on a record of sea songs, so your theory might be correct. Roy says that he then went to Child A for a text, remarking that "I couldn't resist a line like 'Shame on you for a cozening Lord'", partly with the aim of creating a version different from the standard ones.

He eventually dropped the song because (I hope he won't mind me quoting him, but I think the point he makes is an important one that should inform all of us singers) "my head was in it, not my heart, never a good reason for singing any song". He also makes some self-deprecatory remarks about the likely quality of the song you have on tape and suggests you should listen to Burl Ives' version instead - but that's Roy. Modest to the last. I bet it's a cracker really.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,Val bayley
Date: 24 Aug 11 - 12:47 PM

loads of variety, but no last verse, where did I hear this?

well the moral of this tale
It is surely plain to see
before you join the fight identify your enemy
Or you'll end up in that loe and lonesome etc.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Acme
Date: 24 Aug 11 - 01:57 PM

There are lots of last verses, concluding the story, but this added one of yours sounds like it comes through the filter of a singer who felt the need to draw conclusions. Putting a "moral" on the end of the song may be representative of a certain period in time when morals to stories or songs were popular, so this was added on. You know, a trend, akin to the types of messages you find on historic gravestones or the tendency for novels of a period to all have happy endings or sad endings, depending on the popular or religious sentiment.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Joe_F
Date: 24 Aug 11 - 08:08 PM

Richard Dyer-Bennet also sings a version (The Golden Vanity this time -- essentially the same as given by Amos 22 Jul 04) on the LP MG 20007 ("Tom Glazer sings Olden Ballads" on one side, "Richard Dyer-Bennet sings Old Ballads" on t'other).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,Grace
Date: 28 Aug 11 - 09:11 PM

Here's the cool rendition of "The Golden Vanity" by Crooked Still

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4J9ZV62vBs


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Mysha
Date: 28 Aug 11 - 11:59 PM

Hi,

I know of two Dutch translations of Golden Vanity, both by Lennaert Nijgh. However, they are quite different.

One, De Gulden Hoorn (The Golden Horn), among those here, has the boy taking an auger, making 24 holes in the Dunkirk enemy ship while its crew dices and drinks, and after his return being at first refused, but when he threatens the Golden Horn as well and his crew mates threaten to hang the captain, he eventually gets his full reward: Three chests with gold and silver, and the captain's daughter in marriage.

The other, De Noordzee (The North Sea), something like this, has the boy drilling 3 holes in the Spanish enemy ship, and after his return being denied, but eventually rescued by the crew, only to die on the deck and be given back to the sea.

It would be interesting to see where these two fit in; what the English versions were that Nijgh translated from.

Bye
                                                                Mysha


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: GUEST,Iona
Date: 29 Nov 11 - 01:35 AM

I know of a very admirable version of "The Golden Vanity" done by Tommy Makem in his album The Song Tradition. Makem and Clancy also did this song in their album The Makem and Clancy Collection.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Richie
Date: 09 Jan 14 - 05:55 PM

Hi,

The text with "Sir Walter Raleigh built a ship in the Netherlands" is probably from George Edwards. Edwards sent it in in 1934- it's Flanders F2 version in Ancient Ballads. Edwards grandfather was from the British Isles.

This is his family version. Another completely different version was collected from Edwards by Cazden. So it raises questions about the authenticity of the first text.

Richie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Lighter
Date: 09 Jan 14 - 07:58 PM

One of my favorite folkie versions was done by Rick Lee as "The Merry Golden Tree."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Richie
Date: 09 Jan 14 - 10:28 PM

This is evidently traditional from Granny Baird, Mo. pre1924 Lane/Hudson/Randolph B

Then says Sir Raleigh, what will we do?
Oh the lowland, lonesome sea,
The Turkish Robbery it will cut us in two,
As she sailed on the lowland lonesome low,
As we sail on the lonesome sea.

Richie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Golden Vanity Variants
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 10 Jan 14 - 12:44 AM

Sinsull mentioned the version that John Roberts sings. I was just enjoying it recently, from his CD, "Sea Fever, Songs of Ships and the Sea" GHM-108 (2007) http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/. Here are the notes and lyrics from that site.

~ Becky in Long Beach

The Weeping Willow Tree

The Weeping Willow Tree was given to the Vermont collector Helen Hartness Flanders by Lena Bourne "Grammy" Fish of E. Jaffrey, NH. Since this version of The Golden Vanity has a twist in the tail, folklorists have suggested that Mrs. Fish rewrote the ending. I learned it from my dear friend the late Margaret MacArthur of Marlboro, VT.

A sailing ship was fashioned to sail the southern seas
    Down in the Lowlands low,
She was handsome, she was tall, and as trim as trim could be
The name of the ship was the Weeping Willow Tree
    This ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

Her crew were hearty seamen, as brave as brave could be
    Lads from the Lowlands low,
Her decks were broad and wide, and as white as white could be
And on her sail was printed a weeping willow tree
    In this ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

This worthy ship was chosen to sail the Spanish Main
    Far from the Lowlands low,
Our captain he was shrewd, he was also proud and vain
And he hoped by his shrewd dealings a fortune for to gain
    In this ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

As our ship was sailing all on the southern seas
    Far from the Lowlands low,
We met a Spanish ship called the Royal Castilee
And they jeered at the crew of the Weeping Willow Tree
    This ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

The captain called his cabin boy, as he had done before,
    A lad from the Lowlands low,
He said, Boy, you can swim, and your stroke is swift and sure
That sassy Spanish ship, she'll never reach the shore
    You'll sink her in the ocean low, low, low,
    You'll sink her in the ocean low.

In your hand you'll take an augur, and swim to her side
    For we're from the Lowlands low,
And there you'll bore a hole, and you'll bore it deep and wide
For five hundred pounds in gold and to be first mate besides
    You'll sink her in the ocean low, low, low,
    You'll sink her in the ocean low.

So that was the end of the Royal Castilee
    She sank in the ocean low,
Her lofty sails so high and her haughty air so free
They were buried in the depths of the raging southern sea
    We sunk her in the ocean low, low, low,
    We sunk her in the ocean low.

The cabin boy exclaimed, Sir, I now demand my fee
    You knave from the Lowlands low,
Five hundred pounds in gold you now must give to me
And I also am first mate of the Weeping Willow Tree
    This ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

You'll get no gold from me, boy, for causing this wreck
    You thief from the Lowlands low,
And he took the cabin boy by the nap of the neck
And he threw him overboard from the Weeping Willow's deck
    He threw him in the ocean low, low, low,
    He threw him in the ocean low.

Ah, but he still carried the augur as he had done before
    The lad from the Lowlands low,
His heart was full of vengeance and his stroke was swift and sure
Instead of boring one hole, he bored twenty-four
    In that ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

This ship was two hundred leagues from the shore
    Far from the Lowlands low,
The captain and his crew they never reached the shore
And the wilds seemed to say, Fare thee well for evermore
    To that ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.

But one brave hearty seaman escaped the raging sea
    'Twas the lad from the Lowlands low,
He was picked up by a ship, so it has been told to me
And he told to us the tale of the Weeping Willow Tree
    That ship built in the Lowlands, Lowlands low,
    Born to ride the waves, hi, ho.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 20 July 10:38 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.