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Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)

DigiTrad:
LANIGAN'S BALL
PADDLE MY OWN CANOE


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In Mudcat MIDIs:
Adventures of Robinson Crusoe [Harry Clifton] (an amalgamation of a number of melodies - includes 15 sections)


Artful Codger 09 Jul 10 - 05:13 AM
Artful Codger 09 Jul 10 - 02:19 PM
Artful Codger 09 Jul 10 - 02:23 PM
Artful Codger 09 Jul 10 - 03:30 PM
Artful Codger 09 Jul 10 - 03:39 PM
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Steve Gardham 09 Jul 10 - 04:11 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: ROBINSON CRUSOE (Harry Clifton)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 05:13 AM

Or more fully, "The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe". This is a rather lengthy work by the British music hall performer Harry Clifton, set to a medley of popular tunes of the day. These include several songs which Harry himself wrote--songs he expected his audiences would be familiar with, given the inside references in the lyrics. The names of each section refer to the tunes used, and are supplied in the sheet music. For convenience of reference, I have added sequence numbers.

As time permits, I'll supply ABC transcriptions and MIDIs for the individual sections, as well as more information on the works which Clifton used. Some have already been posted to this site.


THE ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE
   Lyrics by Harry Clifton, 1869.
   Music from various sources.

        1. "The Big Cauliflower"
A curious story I will tell as it was told to me
Of all the troubles that befel [sic] a lad of low degree
Who wouldn't go to school or mind a word his parents said;
To play the truant was his rule, a lazy life he led.
His poor old mother how he vexed her,
Tho' he knew it was wrong to do so
He liv'd in the City of Exeter,
And his name was Robinson Crusoe.

        2. "Lancashire Lass"
Robinson Crusoe went one day
   Into the alleys and streets to play,
And met with a juvenile song of the sea,
   As wild as himself, who said come with me
Over the sea where the winds do blow,
   (My Father's a Captain) you shall go,
If you like, and Robinson couldn't say No,
   For a weakminded lad was he.
They hadn't set sail but a month or two,
   When the waves rose high, and the winds they blew,
Robinson shiver'd and shook it was plain,
He wish'd himself back with his mother again.

        3. "I Wish I Was a Fish"
"Why did I leave my native land,"
   Poor robinson did cry,
"Upon this deck why do I stand?"
   He mutter'd mournfully
And while he mutter'd with a shock,
   The ship it roll'd about
And went to pieces on a rock,
   Which made poor Crusoe shout!

I wish I was a fish with a great big tail,
A roley poley porpoise, a lobster or a whale,
A tiny little tittlebat, I cannot swim a little;
I'm going to the bottom of the sea, oh! my!

        4. "Robinson Crusoe"
   But just then a wave,
   From a watery grave,
Did save him and pitch him on dry land,
   Where sad and along,
   He was left to bemoan,
His fate on a desolate Island.
"Oh! why did I ever leave my land?"
He cried as he sat on the Island.
   "Where am I to stay,
   And what am I to eat,
I shall famish and starve on the Island!"

        5. "Up a Tree"
I haven't much society, there isn't much variety,
I've nothing but my dinner; and ditto for my tea,
I have no bed to lie upon, no line my clothes to dry upon,
In fact I may say candidly that I am "Up a tree."

For that's where I must sleep to-night, and fortune may provide me,
To-morrow with a dinner, then satisfied I'd be;
My clothes torn to tatters, there's no-one here, what matters,
So like a little bird to-night, I'll roost "Up in a tree."

I haven't much society, there isn't much variety,
I've nothing for my dinner; and ditto for my tea,
I have no bed to lie upon, no line my clothes to dry upon,
In fact I may say candidly that I am "Up a tree."

        6. "The Calais Packet"
'Twould take a long time, to be telling in rhyme,
How a neat little house out of stick he did make,
Of the sheep that he caught, and the parrot he taught,
To be talking to him just for company's sake.
How his clothes, they were tearing, by constantly wearing,
And the suit that he made would be raising a smile,
Like Brian O Lynn, of the famous sheep skin,
Though the cut was not quite in the Regent Street style.

        7. "Isabella"
   And how he made an umberella,
   Like the charming Isabella,
Just to shade the worthy fellow from the burning sun.

        8. "In fact you know my way"
Crusoe remark'd to himself
As he walk'd on the Island one day,
My will their [sic] is none to dispute,
I'm Monarch of all I survey.
When his eyes caught the print of a foot
On the strand as he happen'd to stray.
He shiver'd and shook in his suit
And his Majesty fainted away.

        9. "Robinson Crusoe"
But his parrot he came, and he call'd him by name,
Saying "Whatever's happen'd to you so,
Get up at once, you cowardly dunce,
I'm asham'd of you Robinson Crusoe!
   Oh Poor Robinson Crusoe,
   I didn't expect it of you, so
Get up at once you cowardly dunce,
I'm asham'd of you Robinson Crusoe.

        10. "The Fisherman's daughter"
Says Crusoe, what is it,
Someone's paid a visit,
The mark of his foot I can see very plain,
I must not neglect it,
My hut I'll protect it,
Or quite unexpected they'll come here again.

        11. "Paddle your own canoe"
With a look of surprise, he open'd his eyes,
Next morning and taking a view
He observed nine or ten little Blackamoor men,
And each Paddled his own Canoe.

        12. "Ten little niggers"
Ten little blackamoors came on shore to dine,
One ran to Crusoe and left the other nine.
Nine follow'd him at a very furious rate,
Crusoe settled one, and then there were eight,
Eight looked astonish'd at the welcome to them given,
So he tomahawk'd another, And then there were seven,
Who had quite enough at least for a day,
So mann'd their their canoes and paddled away.
One little, two little, three little, four litte,
   five little Blackamoor boys.
Six little, seven little, eight little, nine little,
   ten little Blackamoor boys.

        13. "Robinson Crusoe"
   Now Crusoe was kind,
   To the one left behind,
For he knew he could make him of use, so,
   He dress'd him quite tidy,
   And christen'd him Friday,
What a good man was Robinson Crusoe.

        14. "Act on the Square"
For he was fond of acting right,
   Straightforward, just and fair,
And so they liv'd this Black and White
   A very happy pair;
For years, until a ship in sight
   Appear'd with flowing sail,
And bore them off to Britain's Isle,
   And so that ends my tale.

The wind it was fair, boys,
   The wind it was fair,
That wafted the pair, boys,
   That wafted the pair
Over the sea, boys,
   And over the main,
And landed them save in
   Old England again.

        15. "When I put down dis hoof"
His Father was delighted once again his son to see,
The neighbours he invited, Friday jump'd about with glee,
At the very merry welcome they receiv'd from one and all
For with song and dance and music it was quite a rustic ball.

Oh my! Tho' Friday couldn't sing
He pleas'd the friends of Crusoe with quite another thing
They gaz'd with astonishment and wonder all the while
As he did a double shuffle in the Otaheite style.

("The last verse and dance for stage representation only.")


Source: Sheet music published by Hopwood and Crew, London, 1869. Printer's series: H&C 1717.
Transcription by Michael Heaney and Artful Codger from music in the Bodleian Library, Harding Mus. R 641.

On the title (or first?) page:
"The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe."
Comic medley extravaganza, written and sung by Mr. Harry Clifton.
London: Hopwood & Crew, 42, New Bond St.
H&C 1717


Click to play


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Subject: RE: ADD: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 02:19 PM

Music background:

1. The Big Cauliflower
I've been unable to trace this song/tune. According to an advertisement, one songster purported to contain the full music for Clifton's "Robinson Crusoe", but listed the first section as "A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea" rather than "The Big Cauliflower". However, the music in RC is definitely not the popular Walton tune for "A Wet Sheet", though it might possibly fit that text.

2. The Lancashire Lass
This song was published at least by 1869. The music is credited to Jesse Williams in a notice for De Witt's Half Dime Music. The lyrics were probably written by George Leybourne, who popularized the song and wrote many others. Sheet music may be found in the Levy collection, and several broadsides exist, including one in the Library of Congress American Memory collection. I'll post the full song later in this thread.

3. I wish I was a Fish
This song was written by George W. Hunt by 1869. It is also known as "Sweet Polly Primrose". The Bodleian has a copy of the sheet music, and the lyrics have been printed in broadsides (see the Bodleian Library online ballads collection) as well as in The American College Songster (pp. 178-9) compiled by S.C. Andrews. I'll post the lyrics later in this thread.

4, 9, 13. Robinson Crusoe
Clifton may have written the tune for the sections titled "Robinson Crusoe"; I haven't traced another source. On the other hand, several songs about Robinson Crusoe were knocking about the music halls before Clifton's extravaganza, and a songster of the day published one version with words "by various authors", indicating perhaps that one song was especially popular and had inspired a number of imitations which quickly became intertwined.

5. Up a tree
This is another Clifton song; he wrote the words and possibly the music.
See this thread.

6. The Calais Packet
The tune is Welsh "traditional", called "Hunting the Hare" (Hela'r Sgyfarnog, though the spelling varies widely). It seems to be primarily a dance tune; the only lyrics I've turned up have been for English art songs.

A popular song called "The Calais Packet" appeared around 1820; at least one source attributed it to William Makepeace Thackeray. It's mainly a recitation with a few sung bits, but they don't seem to match up with the Welsh tune used in the present work.

7. Isabella
Another Clifton song, "Isabella, the Barber's Daughter" (1866), also called "Isabella and Her Gingham Umbrella"--hence the reference to the "umberella" in the current work. Clifton wrote both the words and music.
See this thread.

8. In fact you know my way
I haven't turned up any information on this work.

10. The Fisherman's Daughter
A popular song more fully titled "The fisherman's daughter, that lives o'er the water". The music was written by Samuel Bagnall, but I haven't found an author credit. The lyrics were printed on several broadsides (one placing the latest date at 1866); another, at the American Memory site, has lyrics for both this song and "The Lancashire Lass", mentioned above. The song, with music, may be found in Naval Songs (p. 125) published by Wm. A Pond & Co., New York, 1883. I'll post the full song later in this thread.

11. Paddle your own canoe
Another Clifton song, from 1865. Words by Harry Clifton, music by Charles Coote, Jr.
See this thread.

12. Ten little niggers
Please don't shoot the messenger. This was a minstrel song adapted by Frank J. Green in 1869 from the song "Ten Little Indians". I know of two popular tunes for this song, neither of which matches the tune used in the current work, nor do I know if it is the same tune used by Green. Steve Gardham has told me he has sheet music for the minstrel song, but I don't know how it compares to the present work.
See also this thread.

14. Act on the Square
A dreadful (but dreadfully popular) moralistic/motto song written by "Anthony" with music by Alfred Lee (1866), which was popularized by Alfred Vance, aka. "The Great Vance", aka. Alfred Glenville, born Alfred Peck Stevens. Vance was a clown turned "lion comique". His most popular song was "Walking in the Zoo", noted for containing the earliest known use of the term "O.K." in its current sense. Alfred Lee also wrote the music for that piece, as well as for the song "Champagne Charlie" (among numerous others).

The Bodleian Library has two copies of the sheet music for "Act on the Square": Harding Mus. R 3711 & -2. Lyrics may also be found in broadsides at the Bodleian Ballads site.

15. When I put down dis hoof
I haven't turned up any information on this work. I would guess it is an American minstrel dance tune.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 02:23 PM

ABC transcription, with each section notated as a separate tune:

% The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe
% Music by various composers; words by Harry Clifton.
% This "song" consists of a running text set to a medley of tunes from popular
%   songs of the day. The titles below correspond to the songs from which
%   these tunes were taken, not to the new lyrics set to them. The titles are
%   supplied in the sheet music. None of the composers are identified there.
S:Sheet music published by Hopwood and Crew, London, ca. 1869; H&C 1717
Z:Michael Heaney (of the Bodleian Library) and Artful Codger.

X:1
T:The Big Cauliflower
C:Source/composer unidentified.
M:2/4
% Erroneously marked as cut time (C-slashed = 2/2)
L:1/8
Q:1/4=92
K:Bb
F | D F d e | d c G> B | A c G c | F2-F F |
w: A cur-ious sto-ry I will tell as it was told to me_ Of
d d d> e | d c G> B | A c G A | B2-B> c |
w: all the trou-bles that be-fel a lad of low de-gree_ Who
%   sic: befel
c c c B | B A A G | ^F A d c | B2-B> c |
w: would not go to school or mind a word his pa-rents said_ To
c c c B | B A A F | A G D =E | F z H_e ||
% M3: =F changed to =E
w: play the tru-ant was his rule, a la-zy life he led. Oh
F | e G G/ G/ A/ F/ | d B F F/ F/ | G/ G/ E B (A/F/) | G F z F |
w: His poor old mo-ther how he vex-ed her, Tho' he knew it was wrong to_ do so, He
G F/ F/ G/ A/ A | B c d e/ e/ | f B c/ c/ d | (c B2) z ||
w: liv'd in the Ci-ty of Ex-et-er, And his name was Rob-in-son Cru-soe.
% Erroneously, an additional quarter rest follows before the next section.


X:2
T:[The] Lancashire Lass
C:Music by Jesse Birch?
M:3/4
L:1/4
Q:1/4=132
K:C
E D C | G2 G | A2 c | G3 | E D C | G G G |
w: Rob-in-son Cru-soe went one day In-to the al-leys and
^F2 d | B2 G | E D C | G G G | A A c | G2 c |
w: streets to play, And met with a ju-ve-nile son of the sea, As
c B A | G c E | E2 D | C2 z | c c B | c c A |
w: wild as him-self, who said come with me. Ov-er the sea where the
G2 c | C2 G | G G F | D2 F | A2 _A | G2 c/ c/ |
w: winds do blow, (My Fa-ther's a Cap-tain) you shall go, If you
c2 B | c c A | G G c | C2 G/ G/ | G ^F =F | E2 D |
w: like, and Rob-in-son could-n't say No, For a weak-mind-ed lad was
C3- | C z || E | E D C | G G G | A2 c | G2 E/ E/ |
w: he._ They had-n't set sail but a month or two, When the
(E D) C | G2 G/ G/ | ^F2 d | G2 z | E D C | G G G |
w: waves_ rose high, and the winds they blew, Rob-in-son shiv-er'd and
A A c | G2 c | c B A | G c E | E F D | C2 x ||
w: shook, it was plain, He wish'd him-self back with his mo-ther a-gain.


X:3
T:I Wish I Was a Fish
C:Music by George W. Hunt.
M:2/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=84
K:C
G | A G F D | C E G c | B F B A | G2-G G |
w: "Why did I leave my nat-ive land," Poor Rob-in-son did cry._ "Up-
A G F D | C E G c | B A F D | C2-C E |
w: on this deck why do I stand?" He mut-ter'd mourn-ful-ly_ And
c B A G | ^F E D> D | E D G> A | B2-B B |
w: while he mut-ter'd with a shock, The ship it roll'd a-bout_ And
c B A G | ^F E D E | ^F c B A | G2 HB2 |
w: went to piec-es on a rock, Which made poor Cru-soe shout! I
c/ c/ c/ c/ c G/ A/ | B A G> G | c/ c/ c/ d/ c/ c/ (G/A/) |
w: wish I was a fish with a great big tail, A rol-ey pol-ey por-poise, a_
B/ B/ A/ A/ D> G | c/ c/ c/ d/ c/ B/ A/ G/ |
w: lob-ster or a whale, A ti-ny lit-tle tit-tle bat, I
A/ B/ c/ A/ G/ G/ (C/D/) | E/ F/ G/ F/ E/ E/ D/ D/ | C B c x ||
w: can-not swim a lit-tle, I'm_ go-ing to the bot-tom of the sea. Oh! my!


X:4
T:Robinson Crusoe
C:Music by Harry Clifton?
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=56
K:C
(G/F/) | E> F E E F G | A> B A (AB) c | G A G G F E |
w: But_ just then a wave, From a wat-er-y grave,_ Did save him and pitch him on
(G3 E) z (G/F/) | E> F E E F G | A B A (AB) c |
w: dry land, Where_ sad and a-lone, He was left to be-moan,_ His
G A G G F E | (D3 C2) G | c c c B A G | (A3 G2) G |
w: fate on the de-so-late Is-land. "Oh! why did I ev-er leave my land?" He
c c c B A G | (A3 G) z F | E> F E E F G |
w: cried as he sat on the Is-land "Where am I to stay, And what
A> B A A B c | G A G G F E | (D3 C2) z || z6 ||
w: am I to eat, I shall fam-ish and starve on the Is-land!"


X:5
T:Up a Tree
C:Music by Harry Clifton.
M:C|
L:1/8
Q:1/2=52
K:A
E | E> A c> B A> G F> E | D> F B> A G> F E> D |
w: I have-n't much so-ci-e-ty, there is-n't much va-ri-e-ty, I've
C> E A> E (C> E) A> E | A> F B> A G2>> F2 |
w: no-thing for my din-_ner; and dit-to for my tea, I
E> A c> B A> G F> E | D> F B> A G> F E> D |
w: have no bed to lie up-on, no line my clothes to dry up-on, In
C> E A> E F> D Hd> d | c> B A> G A2>> E2 |
w: fact I may say can-did-ly that I am "up a tree." For
F F F F F F F> F | F A G F F ^E2 G |
w: that's where I must sleep to night, and for-tune may pro-vide me, To-
G G G G G G z G | G B A G A2>> A2 |
w: mor-row with a din-ner, then sat-is-fied I'd be; My
c c c c c c2 c | d c B A A G2 G |
w: clothes are torn to tat-ters, there's no-one here, what mat-ters, So
A G F ^E F F Hc> B | A G F ^E F2 z E |
% ** M2 last note =E?
w: like a lit-tle bird to-night, I'll roost "Up in a tree." I
E> A c> B A> G F> E | D> F B> A G> F E> D |
w: hav-n't much so-ci-e-ty, there is-n't much va-ri-e-ty, I've
C> E A> E (C> E) A> E | A> F B> A G2>> E2 |
w: no-thing for my din-_ner; and dit-to for my tea, I
E> A c> B A> G F> E | D> F B> A G> F E> D |
w: have no bed to lie up-on, no line my clothes to dry up-on, In
C> E A> E F> D d> d | c> B A> G A3 x ||
w: fact I may say can-did-ly that I am "up a tree."


X:6
T:The Calais Packet
T:(Hunting the Hare / Hela'r Sgyfarnog)
C:Tune: Welsh trad.
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=80
K:A
E | A G A C D E | F B A G F E | A G A C D E |
w: 'Twould take a long time, to be tell-ing in rhyme, How a neat lit-tle house out of
F A G A2 E/ E/ | A G A C D E | F B A G F E |
w:stick he did make, Of the sheep that he caught, and the par-rot he taught, To be
A G A C D E | F A G A2 A/ A/ | c B A c B A |
w:talk-ing to him just for com-pa-ny's sake. How his clothes, they were tear-ing, by
c B A c A G/ A/ | B G A B G A | B d c B2 E |
w: con-stant-ly wear-ing, And the suit that he made would be rais-ing a smile, Like
A G A C D E | F B A G F E |
w: Bri-an O Lynn, of the fam-ous sheep skin, Though the
A G A C D E | F A G A2 z ||
w: cut was not quite in the Re-gent Street style,


X:7
T:Isabella [the Barber's Daughter]
C:Music by Harry Clifton
M:2/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=104
K:D
(A/G/) | F D F A | d d d d | c F G F | G G A G |
w: And_ how he made an um-ber-el-la, Like the charm-ing Is-a-bel-la
F E F D | C D E/ E/ G/ G/ | F2 D2 | D2-D x ||
w: Just to shade the wor-thy fel-low from the burn-ing sun._


X:8
T:In Fact You Know My Way
C:Source/composer unidentified.
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=84
K:D
F F F F E F | D3-D z F/ F/ | A A F A A F |
w: Cru-soe re-mark'd to him-self_ As he walk'd on the Is-land one
A3-A z d | F F F F E F | D3-D z F |
w: day_ My will their is none to dis-pute._ I'm
F B B B B ^A | B3-B z A/ A/ | A d d d d d |
w: Mon-arch of all I sur-vey._ When his eyes caught the print of a
d3-d z A/ A/ | F A A A A F | A3-A z d |
w: foot_ On the stand as he hap=pen'd to stray._ He
F F F E F E | D3-D z F/ F/ | F B B B B ^A | B3-B x2 ||
w: shiv-er'd and shook in his suit_ And his Ma-jes-ty faint-ed a-way.


X:9
T:Robinson Crusoe [2]
C:Music by Harry Clifton?
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=56
K:D
A/ G/ | F> G F F G A | B> c B B c d |
w: But his par-rot he came, and he call'd him by name, Say-ing,
A B A A G F | (A3 F2) z | F> G F (FG) A |
w: "What-ev-er's hap-pen'd to you so, Get up at once,_ you
B> c B B c d | A B A G G F | (E3 D2) z |
w: cow-ard-ly dunce, I'm a-sham'd of you Rob-in-son Cru-soe!
d2 d c B A | (B3 A2) A | d d d c B A | (B3 A2) z |
w: Oh Poor Rob-in-son Cru-soe, I did-n't ex-pect it of you so
F> G F (FG) A | B B B B c d | A B A A G F | (E3 D2) x ||
w: Get up at once_ you cow-ard-ly dunce, I'm a-sham'd of you Rob-in-son Cru-soe.


X:10
T:The Fisherman's Daughter
C:Music by Sam Bagnall
M:3/4
L:1/4
Q:1/4=160
K:D
(F/G/) | A d d | d c E | G B B | B A D |
w: Says_ Cru-soe, "What is it, Some one's paid a vis-it," The
F A A | A G F | G c> B | A2 (F/G/) |
w: mark of his foot I can see ve-ry plain, I_
A d d | d c E | G B B | B A D |
w: must not ne-glect it, My hut I'll pro-tect it, Or
F A A | A G E | F G E | D2 x ||
w: quite un-ex-pect-ed they'd come here a-gain.


X:11
T:Paddle Your Own Canoe
C:Music by Charles Coote, Jr.
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=64
K:G
D/ D/ | B B d c2 A | B B G E2 F |
w: With a look of sur-prise, he o-pen'd his eyes, Next
G F G c c B | A3-A D D | B B d c c A |
w: morn-ing and ta-king a view_ He ob-served nine or ten lit-tle
B B G E F G | D ^C D B2 A | G3-G2 z |
w: Black-a-moor men, And each Pad-dled his own Ca-noe._ ||
%   A four-measure interlude follows in cut time.


X:12
T:Ten Little Niggers
M:C|
L:1/8
Q:1/4=140
K:G
D2 G G F F A2 | G F G B c2 z2 | c2 A A B2 G G |
w: Ten lit-tle black-a-moors came on shore to dine. One ran to Cru-soe and
A G F E D2 z2 | D2 G G F2 A A | G F G B d2 z2 |
w: left the o-ther nine. Nine fol-low'd him at a ve-ry fur-ious rate,
c c A A B3 G | A2 D D G2 z2 | D2 G G F F A A |
w: Cru-soe set-tled one, and then there were eight, Eight looked a-ston-ish'd at the
G F G B d d d d | c c A A B B G2 |
w: wel-come to them giv-en, So he tom-a-hawk'd an-oth-er, and
A G (FE) D3 D | D2 G G F2 A2 | (GF) G B d3 d |
w: then there were_ seven, Who had quite e-nough at least_ for a day, So
c2 A A B2 G2 | A2 D D G2 z2 |
w: mann'd their ca-noes and pad-dled a-way
D2 G G F2 A A | G2 B B A2 c c |
w: One lit-tle, two lit-tle, three lit-tle, four lit-tle
B2 G G A A D2 | G4-G2 z2 | G2 B B A2 c c |
w: five lit-tle Black-a-moor boys,_ Six lit-tle, seven lit-tle,
B2 d d c2 e e | d2 d d d d F2 | G4-G2 z x ||
w: eight lit-tle, nine lit-tle, ten lit-tle Black-a-moor boys._


X:13
T:Robinson Crusoe [3]
C:Music by Harry Clifton?
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=56
K:C
(G/F/) | E> F E E F G | A> B A A B c |
w: Now_ Cru-soe was kind, to the one left be-hind, For he
G A G G F E | (G3 E) z (G/F/) |
w: knew he could make him of use, so, He
E> F E E F G | A B A A B c/ c/ |
w: dress'd him quite ti-dy, And christ-en'd him Fri-day, What a
G A G G F E | (D3 C2) x ||
w: good man was Rob-in-son Cru-soe.


X:14
T:Act on the Square
C:Music by Albert Lee ("The Great Vance")
M:2/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
K:G
B | d G G> A | G F d> d | d E E> F | D2 z B |
w: For he was fond of act-ing right, straight for-ward, just and fair, And
d G G> A | G F d> F | F E B> A | D2 z D |
w: so they liv''d this Black and White A ve-ry hap-py pair; For
D c c> d | c B B> c | B A G F | G2 z G |
w: years, un-til a ship in sight, Ap-pear'd with flow-ing sail, And
A A B c | d G HF> E | D c B A | G2-G ||
w: bore them off to Brit-ain's Isle, And so that ends my tale._
[M:3/4][L:1/4][Q:1/4=140] D/ | B c> B | A d> G | G A> G | F2 F |
w: The wind it was fair, boys, The wind it was fair, That
E F E | D G> F | E A B | (A2 ^A) |
w: waft-ed the pair, boys, That waft-ed the pair_
B c> B | A d> G | G A G | F2 F |
w: O-ver the sea, boys, And o-ver the main, And
E F E | "^rall." D G c | B B> A | G3 ||
w: land-ed them safe in Old Eng-land a-gain.


X:15
T:When I Put Down Dis Hoof
C:Composer unknown.
M:2/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=104
K:D
G | F> E D> F | A> A A> A | B> c d> B | A2 z G |
w: His Fa-ther was de-light-ed once a-gain his son to see, The
F> E D> E | F> F E> D | C> E D> C | B, z G> G |
w: neigh-bours he in-vit-ed, Fri-day jump'd a-bout with glee, At the
F> E D> F | A> A A> A | B> c d> B | A2-A G/ G/ |
w: ve-ry mer-ry wel-come they re-ceiv'd from on and all_ For with
F> E D> E | F> F D> F | A> F G> E | D2-D z |
w: song and dance and mu-sic it was quite a rus-tic ball.
(A3 F) | B3 G | A> B A> F | d2-d> d |
w: Oh_ my That Fri-day couuldn-n't sing._ He
d> e d> c | B> c (d>e) | c> d c> B | A2-A> A |
w: pleas'd the friends of Cru-soe with_ quite an-oth-er thing._ They
A2 A> F | B> B B> G | A> B A> F | d2 d> d |
w: gaz'd with a-ston-ish-ment, and won-der all the while As he
d> e d> c | B> c d> e | d> c B> c | d2-d Hz ||
w: did a dou-ble shuf-fle in the O-ta-hei-te style._
% Sheet music note: "The last verse and dance for stage representation only."


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Subject: Re: The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe
From: Artful Codger
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 03:30 PM

See this thread for lots of information on the tune "Hunting the Hare", including several sets of lyrics (all of which are too "nymphs, shepherds, rosy dawn and Venus on a half shell" to be convincing as hunting songs).


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Subject: Lyr Add: LANCASHIRE LASS (George Leybourne)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 03:39 PM

Here is the original song "The Lancashire Lass":


Geo. Leybourne's New Song of the
LANCASHIRE LASS.

You may talk of young girls, but none can surpass,
My dear little charmer that comes from Oldham,
Fresh and as sweet as the newly mown grass,
Is my little Polly the Lancashire Lass;
She's eves so blue, and teeth so white,
Her hair is brown, her step is light,
Her ankle its a perfect mite,
My beautiful Lancashire Lass.

My Lancashire Lass, there's none can surpass,
My Lancashire Lass for style and beauty
My Lancashire Lass,—come fill your glass,
And drink to the health of my Lancashire Lass.

The way that I won her is strange you will say,
'Twas one afternoon that I went to Bellevue,
A young friend of mine was there for the day,
And took little Polly for whom he'd to pay;
When first we met I soon could see,
That with his chance 'twas all U P,
And so I asked her if she'd have me,
This beautiful Lancashire Lass.

She said she'd be mine, and she swore to be true,
We've since been like doves, billing and cooing!
We never fall out as some lovers do,
And she has some money betwixt me and you;
She bought this watch which now I wear,
If she dout mind, well I don't care,
She says that her fortune I shall share,
My beautiful Lancashire Lass.

She's published the banns, we're going to be wed;
I leave those matters for her to settle,
To-morrow, for time so quickly has fled,
The Lancashire Lass to the church will be led;
I need not work while there's a purse,
To the idea I'm not averse,
And perhaps one day I may have to nurse
A sweet little Lancashire Lass.


Imprint: W. S. FORTEY, General Steam Printer and Publisher, 2 & 3. Monmouth Court, Bloomsbury. (London); between 1858 and 1885
Stamped: 397
Source site: Library of Congress American Memory
Also at Bodley Ballads.
Music credited to Jesse Williams in a notice for De Witt's Half Dime Music.

X:1
T:The Lancashire Lass
C:Arranged by Harry Birch
M:3/4
L:1/4
Q:1/4=168 " Tempo di Valse."
K:C
(E/ E/) | E D C | G2 G | A A c | G2 G | E D C |
w: You may talk of young girls but none can sur-pass, My dear lit-tle
G G G | ^F F d | B2 G | E D C | G G G |
w: charm-er, who comes from Bel-fast She's fresh and as sweet as the
A A c | G2 c | c B A | G c E | E E D | C2 ||
w: new-ly mown grass Is my lit-tle Pol-ly the Lan-ca-shire Lass;
c | c2 B | c2 A | G2 c | C2 G | G2 F |
w: She's eyes so blue, and teeth so white, Her hair is
D2 F | A2 _A | G2 c | c2 B | c2 A |
w: brown, her step is light, Her an-kle it's a
G2 c | C2 G | G ^F =F | E E D | C3- | C2 ||
w: per-frect mite, My beau-ti-ful Lan-ca-shire Lass._
%
%    Chorus.
|: "^Chorus." E | E D C | G2 G | A A c | G2 E | E D C |
w: My Lan-ca-shire Lass sure none can sur-pass, My Lan-ca-shire
G2 G | ^F2 d | B B G | E D C | G2 G |
w: Lass for style and beau-ty, My Lan-ca-shire Lass, come
A A c | G2 c | c B A | G c E | E E D | C2 :|
w: fill up your glass, And drink to the health of my Lan-ca-shire Lass.
  • Click to play (Lancashire Lass-from Robinson Crusoe)

  • Click to play (Lancashire Lass)


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    Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: THE FISHERMAN'S DAUGHTER
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 09 Jul 10 - 03:57 PM

    The original song "The Fisherman's Daughter":


    THE FISHERMAN'S DAUGHTER
       Composed by Sam. Bagnall. [by 1870]
       Tempo di Valse.

    1. I've been caught in a net by a dear little pet,
    And her eyes are as blue as the deep rolling sea,
    She's a fisherman's daughter, she lives o'er the water,
    She's going to be married next Sunday to me.
    She's as rare as the salmon, there's really no gammon,
    As sweet as shrimps newly serv'd up for tea.
    My soul she has caught, and a place I have bought,
    Where a ray of bright sunshine forever will be.

            Chorus.
       And / She's a fisherman's daughter, she lives o'er the water,
       She's going to be married next Sunday to me.
       She's a fisherman's daughter, she lives o'er the water,
       She's going to be married next Sunday to me.

    2. She's bare footed and pretty, she's lively and witty,
    She sings her wild songs to the murmuring sea;
    She'll dance on the sands where the fisherman stands,
    And join in the muse of a wild swelling glee.
    She sits in her boat and sings o'er the billows,
    And flirts with the spray like a sea skimming gull;
    She laughs at the winds whose revels are music,
    And beats to the time with the stroke of her scull.

    3.The bells they shall ring, and the sailors shall sing
    Y-heave ho, y-heave ho, boys, for time's on the wing,
    To see pretty Sarah, the pride of the sea,
    Who's going to be married next Sunday to me.
    Her hair I will deck with a wreath of bright seaweed,
    I'll plant in her bosom a blooming moss rose;
    She shall go like a fay with sweet tinkling music,
    With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes.

    Source: Naval Songs, p. 125. Published by Wm. A Pond & Co., New York, 1883. (Available online at Google Books)

    X:1
    T:The Fisherman's Daughter
    S:Naval Songs, p. 125. Published by Wm. A Pond & Co,. New York, 1883
    C:Sam. Bagnall
    M:3/4
    L:1/4
    Q:1/4=144
    K:D
    %
    %    Verse.
    "^Tempo di Valse." (F/G/) | Add | dcE | GBB | BAD |
    w: I've been caught in a net by a dear lit-tle pet, And her
    FAA | AGF | Gc>B | A2 (F/G/) | Add |
    w: eyes are as blue as the deep roll-ing sea, She's a fis-er-man's
    dcE | GBB | (BA)D | F/ F/AA | AGF |
    w: daugh-ter, she lives o'er the wa-ter, She's go-ing to be mar-ried next
    FGC | D2 (C/D/) | EAA | (A^G)E | EBB | BAE |
    w: Sun-day to me. She's as rare as the sal-mon, there's real-ly no gam-mon, As
    c2c | dcB | EF^G | A2 (C/D/) | EAA | (A^G)E |
    w: sweet as shrimps new-ly serv'd up for tea, My_ soul she has caught, and a
    EBB | BAE | cBc | dcB | EF^G | HA H=G ||
    % Last A was half note.
    w: place I have bought, Where a ray of bright sun-shine for-ev-er will be. And
    %
    %    Chorus.
    "^Chorus." |: F/G/ | Add | dcE | GBB | BAD |
    w: She's a fish-er-man's daugh-ter, she lives o'er the wa-ter, She's
    F/ F/AA | GGF | Gc>B | A2 F/ G/ | Add | dcE |
    w:go-ing to be mar-ried next Sun-day to me. She's a fish-er-man's daugh-ter, she
    GBB | BAD | F/ F/ AA | AGF | FGC | D2 :|
    w: lives o'er the wa-ter, She's go-ing to be mar-ried next Sun-day to me.

    ===

    The Fisherman's Daughter

    1. I've been caught in a net by a dear little pet,
       And her eyes are as blue as the deep rolling sea,
    She's a fisherman's daughter—she lives o'er the water,
       She's going to be married next Sunday to me.
    She's as rare as the salmon, there's really no gammon;
       As sweet as shrimps newly served up for tea;
    My soul she has caught, and a place I have bought,
       Where a ray of bright sunshine forever will be.

            Chorus.
       And—she's a Fisherman's daughter—she lives o'er the water—
          She's going to be married next Sunday to me.

    2. She's barefooted and pretty, she's lively and witty,
       She sings her wild songs to the murmuring sea;
    She'll dance on the sands where the Fisherman stands,
       And join in the muse of a wild swelling glee.
    She sits in her boat and scuds* o'er the billows,        [sings]
       And flirts with the spray like a sea skimming gull;
    She laughs at the wind—whose revels are music,
       And beats to the time with the stroke of her scull.

    3.The bells they shall ring, and the sailors shall sing,
       "Y-heave ho, y-heave ho, boys, for time's on the wing,
    To see pretty Sarah, the pride of the sea!"
       Who's going to be married next Sunday to me.
    Her hair I will deck with a wreath of bright sea-weed,
       I'll plant in her bosom a blooming moss rose;
    She shall go like a fairy* with sweet tinkling music,        [fay]
       With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes.


    Source site: The Bodleian Library ballads site: Harding B 11(1215); between 1840 and 1866.
    Printer: J. Harkness, Preston. Printer's series 953. License note: Sec. 28.
    Music at Hopwood and Crew's.

    ===

    THE
    FISHERMAN'S
    DAUGHTER
    THAT LIVES O'ER THE WATER.

    I've been caught in a net by a dear little pet,
    And her eyes are as blue as the deep rolling sea,
    She's a Fisherman's daughter, she lives o'er the water,
    She's going to be married next Sunday to me.
    She's rare as the salmon, there's really no gammon,
    As sweet as shrimps newly served up for tea;
    My soul she has caught, and a place I have bought,
    Where a ray of bright sunshine for ever will be.

    Chorus.
    And she's a Fisherman's daughter, she lives o'er the water,
    She's going to be married next Sunday to me.

    She's barefooted and pretty, she's lively and witty,
    She sings her wild songs to the murmuring sea;
    She'll dance on the sands where the Fishermen stands,
    And join in the music of a wild swelling glee,
    She sits in her boat, and scuds o'er the billows,
    And flirts with the spray like a sea-skimming gull,
    She laughs at the winds—whose revels are music,
    And beats to the time with the stroke of her scull.

    The bells they shall ring, and the sailors shall sing,
    Y-heave ho! y-heave ho, boys! for tima's on the wing,
    To see pretty Sarah the pride of the sea.
    Who's going to be married next Sunday to me.
    Her hair I will deck with a wreath of bright seaweed,
    I'll plant in her bosom a blooming moss rose;
    She shall go like a fairy with sweet tinkling music,
    With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,


    Imprint: W. S. FORTEY, General Steam Printer and Publisher, 2 & 3. Monmouth Court, Bloomsbury.
    Stamped: 397
    Source site: The Library of Congress American Memory collection.
  • Click to play (Fisherman's Daughter)

  • Click to play (Fisherman's Daughter-NS)


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    Subject: Lyr Add: I WISH I WAS A FISH (G. W. Hunt)
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 09 Jul 10 - 04:07 PM

    I WISH I WAS A FISH!
       [or, Sweet Polly Primrose]
       [George W. Hunt, by 1869]

    Sweet Polly Primrose was a girl
       Of nineteen summers old,
    I lov'd sweet Polly better far,
       Than all the wealth* untold ;                [world]
    And she was very fond of me,
       But now I wail and weep,
    For the girl I love's—at present—
       At the bottom of the deep.
            [Chorus:]
    So I wish I was a fish with a great long tail,
       [I wish I was a fish with a great big tail,]
    A tiny little tittlebat, a winkle or a whale,
       At the bottom of the deep blue sea.
                    Oh, my.

    [2]
    Sweet Polly was on board a ship,
       And bound for Charing Cross*,                [Union Square]
    When the vessel sighted Blackfriars Bridge*,        ["Tammany"]
       It began to pitch and toss* ;                [rear]
    My love was gazing over,
       At the water rolling by,
    When somehow she tumbled overboard,
       And never said "Good-bye !"
                    So I wish, &c.

    [3]
    The captain and his gallant crew
       Jump'd overboard to save
    My darling Polly, but in vain—
       She'd sunk beneath the wave :
    And when they told me of her fate,
       I'd tear my heair and weep,
    And requested I might be allow'd
       To plunge into the deep.
                    So I wish, &c.

    [4]
    I had a dream, last night, that I
       Was down below the wave,
    And there I saw my Polly,
       In a gorgeous coral cave ;
    She'd changed into a mermaid,
       And she'd such a splendid tail,
    And she was doing double shuffles,
       In conjunction with a whale.
                    So I wish, &c.

    [5]
    While she's a sportive mermaid,
       I'm so wretched here above,
    So I think I'll take a plunge and be,
       A merman with my love ;
    But the precise locality
       I don't exactly know
    Where I may find my Polly,
       So perhaps I'd best not go.
                    So I wish, &c.


    Source: The Bodleian Library ballads site: Harding B 20(111).
    Dated between 1840 and 1866 [written in 1869, per another source]
    Printer: J. Harkness, Preston. Plate #: 994.
    On same sheet: Mother Far Away (sequel to Driven from Home)

    Corroboration: The American College Songster, pp. 178-9; compiled by S.C. Andrews, University of Michigan. Ann Arbor: Sheehan & Co., 1876. Wording differences in square braces.

    Click to play (I Wish I Was a Fish)


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    Subject: RE: ADD: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Steve Gardham
    Date: 09 Jul 10 - 04:11 PM

    There's a hell of a lot of work gone in there.
    Well done to Mike and Artful!


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    Subject: Lyr Add: ACT ON THE SQUARE, BOYS!
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 09 Jul 10 - 04:13 PM

    ACT ON THE SQUARE, BOYS!
       [Written by Anthony, music by Albert Lee]
       [Popularlized by Albert Vance, aka. "The Great Vance"]
       Tune—Original.

    Through being fond of acting right,
       Straightforward, just, and fair,
    I try to make my troubles right*,        [light]
       And little do I care.
    As happy as a king I live
       On just what I spare,
    And from experience I give
       This hint—act on the square.

            Chorus.
    Act on the square, boys, act on the square,
    Upright and fair, boys, act on the square;
    Act on the square, boys, act on the square,
    Upright and fair, boys, act on the square.

    Now in the street a thing so bad,
       Which often is the case,
    A swellish foolish-looking lad
       Some modest girl will chase.
    Then square you round and let him see,
       If he annoyance dare,
    You'll give him striking proof to show
       How to act on the square.

    When out one night with noisy swells,
       The Haymarket kept alive,
    One Sergeant X with oyster shells
       To pelt they did contrive.
    They nearly got into disgrace,
       But squaring served* them there;        [saved]
    And brightly shone the bobby's face,
       Who liked to see things square.

    I never liked a round game, nay,
       Round tables can't a-bear,
    And in a circus I can't stay,
       So I live in a square.
    Now, brothers all, and Masons too,
       Of good let's do our share,
    And when a chance presents itself,
       We must act on the square.

    Source: The Bodleian Library ballads site: Firth c.21(151)
    Printer: The Poet's Box, Glasgow; Saturday morning, March 19, 1870.
    Secondary source: Harding B 16(2a). Printer and date unknown.

    Click to play


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    Subject: RE: ADD: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Joe Offer
    Date: 09 Jul 10 - 08:19 PM

    OK, so Artful Codger wants ALL 15 of the separate tunes for "Robinson Crusoe." Let's hope I don't screw up.
    1. Click to play (Big Cauliflower)

    2. Click to play (Lancashire Lass)

    3. Click to play (I Wish I Was a Fish)

    4. Click to play (Robinson Crusoe)

    5. Click to play (Up a Tree)

    6. Click to play (Calais Packet)

    7. Click to play (Isabella)

    8. Click to play (In Fact You Know)

    9. Click to play (Robinson Crusoe)

    10. Click to play (Fisherman's Daughter)

    11. Click to play (Paddle Your Own Canoe)

    12. Click to play (Ten Little Niggers)

    13. Click to play (Robinson Crusoe)

    14. Click to play (Act on the Square)

    15. Click to play (When I Put Down Dis Hoof)

    {Whew!!}


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    Subject: RE: ADD: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 09 Jul 10 - 08:54 PM

    Thanks, Joe, beautifully done.


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Joe Offer
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 05:24 AM

    I received a very nice e-mail today, and I thought some of you might like to read it - especially Artful Codger, who did so much work on this thread. Posted with Mr. Noonan's permission:

      Joe,

      My name is Robert Noonan, from Sydney, Australia. When I was a lad of 3 or 4
      my grandmother used to sing the song of Robinson Crusoe to me, but
      only verses 2, 3 and 4. All my life so far, and I have just turned 66,
      I have wondered if there was more to the song than she taught me.
      Several times I have searched the net but found nothing, until today.

      Lo and behold! There it was , in all its glory, the complete set of
      lyrics and music on your website. My life is now complete, I can die a
      happy man. I was tempted to join the mudcat fraternity but since my
      interest is extremely limited, and my curiosity now satisfied, I would
      be more of a hindrance than anything.

      If it is of any interest to you, the version I learned had some
      differences in the lyrics and tunes, but basically the same. For
      instance, the "tittlebat" became a "stickleback" which is a real fish.
      I have never heard of a tittlebat but it may be a regional variation.
      The "or a lobster or a whale" became "or a monster whale". The line
      "And while he mutter'd with a shock" became "And while he shivered
      with a shock" which seems to make more sense to me.

      My grandmother was born in the late 1800's in rural Victoria, and lived
      at a place called Goomallibee as a young girl. Her main claim to fame
      was that she went to school with Ned Kelly's sister. Ned Kelly was a
      famous outlaw of the times, but I am not sure if his fame spread beyond
      our shores. She also taught me some other little songs of her era, one
      was "Little Dame Crump", of which I can recall most of the words. If
      anyone is interested I can supply you with what I can remember.

      Thank you for making an old man very happy, I will pass your website
      along to some of my uncles who are now in their late 80's. It was
      their mother (my nanna) who taught us all the song, I am sure they
      will be interested as they are a very musical lot.

      Regards,

      R. F. Noonan


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: GUEST
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 09:47 AM

    Lovely letter, Joe.
    Thanks for the midis.

    FWIW I think many of them have traces of trad phrases in the tunes with the occasional unexpected twist. Many based on polkas of course which were the rage at that time.

    'Robinson Crusoe' itself reminds me of 'Fine Hunting day' from the same period.

    'Calais packet' is a very well-known tune today but I can't quite place it, either a morris tune or a hunting song. Come on Mick. You've a better memory than I have.

    'In Fact you know' sound as if I in fact should know.

    And '10 Little N' is is similar to the tune I sang as a child.


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: GUEST
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 09:49 AM

    Cookie's gone again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    That last was me SteveG

    Why do we keep losing our cookies, whatever they are?


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Charley Noble
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 01:23 PM

    Another fine Mudcat project. And a great response from the public!

    Charley Noble


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 01:26 PM

    As I mentioned above, the "Calais Packet" tune as given in "Robinson Crusoe" is the Welsh song "Hunting the Hare". For what it's worth, Jon Boden sang this as part of his Folk Song a Day project.

    I also hear some points of similarity between "Robinson Crusoe" and "Fine Hunting Day", but they're definitely different tunes, though I wouldn't be surprised if the RC tune belonged to another hunting song.

    Cookies are small files of session-tracking information that sites (with your express or implicit permission) store on your system via web browsers. Cookies typically have expiration periods, so after a time they can be removed. If you haven't logged in for some weeks (keeping the Mudcat cookies refreshed) they can time out. That said, there's some other problem that occasionally causes cookies to be either removed prematurely or to become unloadable; Max may be the only one who has an inkling why that happens. Of course, if you ever clear your browser cache, cookies tend to be part of the information cleared. I have my browser configured to remove all cookies when I close my browser, except for those associated with selected sites (like Mudcat).


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 01:38 PM

    I'm suffering lapses today:
    A Fine Hunting Day, from a field recording in the British Library. There used to be a recording on YouTube of (if I recall) Dennis Westmorland—it sounded like it was taken from a commercial record, though Google doesn't seem to have heard of it.


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Steve Gardham
    Date: 25 Sep 12 - 03:52 PM

    Hi Artful,
    There should be fuller versions I recorded on the BL site, but that chorus illustrates the tune well enough. I have the original sheet music somewhere.


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: GUEST, Sminky
    Date: 26 Sep 12 - 05:53 AM

    Great letter. Good work.

    Like Mr Noonan, I think we can all die happy. Though ..... errr ..... not just yet.


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 26 Sep 12 - 06:12 PM

    Yes, Steve, I found the fuller recording of "Fine Hunting Day" and started a thread on the song, since up till now it's only been mentioned here and there. So if you do come across the sheet music, please scan it for me and I'll do up a transcription and MIDI.

    The bygone recording on YouTube was of Denis (one N) Westmorland. But I suppose we should get back to "Robinson Crusoe"....


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: GUEST
    Date: 22 Dec 12 - 02:25 PM

    While we're talking about Robinson Crusoe, does anyone have the full words to 'Where did Robinson Crusoe go with Friday on a Saturday night?"?


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Joybell
    Date: 22 Dec 12 - 02:50 PM

    Yes but someone will probably beat me to it. If not I'll post them. It's surely here on Mudcat. Off to look.
    Cheers, Joy


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Joybell
    Date: 22 Dec 12 - 02:57 PM

    Unnamed Guest "Where did Robinson Crusoe go with Friday on Saturday Night" -- is on thread number 0.8792. Hasn't made it to the DT for some reason.


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    Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Robinson Crusoe (Harry Clifton)
    From: Artful Codger
    Date: 22 Dec 12 - 09:45 PM

    Specifically, here.

    Sheet music is available online in the Lester S. Levy Collection.


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