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Lyr Add: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion

Related threads:
Lyr Req: The End of My Old Cigar (Harry Champion) (27)
Lyr Add: Nan! Nan! Nan! (from Harry Champion) (3)
Lyr Req: Robin Redbreast (from Harry Champion) (4)
Lyr Req: Here Comes Old Father Christmas (Champion (4)
Lyr Add: I Was Holding My Coconut (H Champion) (9)
Lyr Req: Doctor Shelley (from Harry Champion) (10)
Lyr Req: Down Came the Blind (from Harry Champion (7)
Lyr Add: While I Was Licking My Stamp (Champion) (6)
Lyr Req: Don't Do It Again Matilda (H Champion) (12)
Lyr Add: Carroty (from Harry Champion) (2)
Lyr Add: Wotcher, My Old Brown Son (H Champion) (2)
Lyr Req: I'm Proud of My Old Bald Head (Champion) (7)
Lyr Req: Cover It Over Quick Jemima (H Champion) (26)
Lyr Req: The Best that Money Can Buy (H Champion) (1)
Lyr Req: The Old Red Lion (Harry Champion) (1)
Lyr Req: My Wife's Sister's Pussy Cat (Champion) (2)
Lyr Req: The Girl with the Golden Hair (Champion) (1)
Lyr Req: The Ragtime Ragshop (from Harry Champion) (3)
Lyr Req: It's Cold Without Your Trousers (Champion (1)
Lyr Req: I'm William the Conqueror (f/H Champion) (1)
Lyr Req: Home Made Sausages (Harry Champion) (1)
Lyr Req: Father Looked Funny (from Harry Champion (1)
Lyr Req: A Natty Little Patch Behind (H Champion) (4)
Lyr Req: Red, White and Blue (from Harry Champion (4)
Lyr Req: Brown, Brown, Sit Down (Harry Champion) (1)
Lyr Req: Hey-Diddle-Diddle (from Harry Champion) (2)
Lyr Req: Aunt Tilly (from Harry Champion) (3)
Lyr Req: Cockney Bill of London Town (H Champion) (6)
Lyr Add: I Enjoyed It (from Harry Champion) (1)
Lyr Add: Have a Drop of Gin, Joe (from H Champion (3)
Lyr Add: My Old Iron Cross (from Harry Champion) (1)
Lyr Add: Good Old Yorkshire Pudding (Champion) (1)
Lyr Add: Samuel Duff (from Harry Champion, 1914) (1)
Lyr Add: Boiled Beef and Carrots (Harry Champion) (15)
Lyr Req: That Gorgonzola Cheese (Harry Champion) (7)


Jim Dixon 02 Feb 11 - 03:17 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Feb 11 - 03:19 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Feb 11 - 08:10 PM
SPB-Cooperator 03 Feb 11 - 02:03 AM
Brakn 03 Feb 11 - 04:54 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Feb 11 - 10:21 AM
Jim Dixon 05 Feb 11 - 11:50 AM
Jim Dixon 05 Feb 11 - 11:54 AM
Jim Dixon 11 Feb 11 - 09:12 PM
Jim Dixon 11 Feb 11 - 09:14 PM
Jim Dixon 12 Feb 11 - 09:12 AM
Jim Dixon 26 Feb 11 - 07:19 PM
GUEST,GOM 04 Mar 11 - 07:35 AM
GUEST 22 Sep 11 - 07:46 PM
chrisgl 22 Sep 11 - 08:07 PM
chrisgl 22 Sep 11 - 08:18 PM
GUEST,joolz 06 Oct 12 - 05:08 PM
keberoxu 19 Jul 16 - 03:24 PM
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Subject: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Feb 11 - 03:17 PM

You may have noticed, I've been transcribing several old music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion. Many of them are not complete; I am counting on help from others to fill in the gaps. Therefore, I figured each song should be in a thread of its own. It could get confusing if people started posting corrections to several different songs in one thread.

When I'm done entering songs, I will post links to them in this thread.

Also, I plan to use this thread for songs that don't require much discussion and correction.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NEVER LET YOUR BRACES DANGLE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Feb 11 - 03:19 PM

I found a text online for this music-hall song, and tweaked it to agree with what I hear in the recording, which you can also hear, at The Internet Archive.

There's another version in the DT, attributed to Cosmotheka, but it's been contaminated by some quotes from THE OULD TRIANGLE, and some repeats that aren't in the original. Also, it has a few other differences which I have marked here in boldface:


NEVER LET YOUR BRACES DANGLE
Words and music by Robert P Weston & Fred J Barnes, 1909
As sung by Harry Champion

1. I was one of eighteen boys.
Then we all wore corduroys.
I was the roughest of the gang,
'Cause my braces used to hang
Dangling all around my feet. My mother used to bawl,
Pointing to a text so neat she'd hung up on the wall:

"Never let your braces dangle, dingle, dingle, dangle.
Never thieve; don't deceive; never row or wrangle.
Stick to the right; keep away from the bad.
Don't get tight like your poor old dad."
But the greatest motto of the lot, my lad:
"Never let your braces dangle."

2. Mrs. Murphy's got a mat
Like(?) the skin of some tomcat.
On the floor it looks no doubt
Like a man's been flattened out.
I said to her, "Mary Ann, your carpet does look queer."
She said, "That's my first old man," and whispered in my ear:

"Never let your braces dangle, dingle, dingle, dangle.
Poor old sport, he got caught and dragged right through the mangle.
Over the rollers he rolled till he come
Out like a yard of linoleum.
You may wipe your feet on his rum-tum-tum.
Never let your braces dangle."

3. On one foggy afternoon,
Once we had to shoot the moon.
On the barrow I had got
Beds and chairs and all the lot,
But I stuck it with a will, though people in the road
Shouted as up Highgate Hill I dragged my little load:

"Never let your braces dangle, dingle, dingle, dangle."
Up that hill I stuck it till my legs got in a tangle.
Got to the top, said a chappie, "Here we are."
Undid me braces and murmured "ta."
I'd been pulling up a tramway car!
Never let your braces dangle.

4. One day fishing in a brook,
With a worm upon my hook,
I turned round as in a dream,
Braces dangled in the stream.
Some old shark came sailing by so quietly underneath,
Nipped my braces, winked his eye, and whispered through his teeth:

"Never let your braces dangle, dingle, dingle, dangle."
That old shark, out for a lark, said, "I'll teach you to angle."
He gave a tug. I was into his jaw,
Into his tum and I said, "Oh, Lor!"
As he pushed me out of his little back door,
"Never let your braces dangle."

REPEAT LAST CHORUS


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Subject: Lyr Add: GINGER, YOU'RE BALMY! (Fred Murray)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Feb 11 - 08:10 PM

You can hear this song at The Internet Archive. (It's the 4th of 10 songs on that page.)


GINGER, YOU'RE BALMY!*
Words and music by Fred Murray, 1910.
As sung by Harry Champion

1. I'm always in the fashion. I'm a noted chap for that,
So lately I've been walking about the streets without a hat.
I do without a cady. Why, it saves me half a quid.
I'm like a bloomin' saucepan on the fire without a lid.
I go, you know, strolling round the town, waves my little cane about.
Girls all say, "Look! Ginger's on the mash," dig me in the ribs and shout:

CHORUS: "Don't walk about without your cady on. Ginger, you're barmy.
Get your hair cut," they all begin to cry.
"With nothing on your napper, oh, you are a pie.
Pies must have a little bit of crust. Why don't you join the army?
If you want to be a don, you want a bit of something on. Ginger, you're barmy."

2. Once I went into the zoo with such a smiling face,
But, oh, there was a hullabaloo when I got in the place!
The keepers started chasing me, then I got in a rage.
They put a chain around my neck and they bunged me in a cage.
I cried, "I'm not a monkey, on my word!" I had to buy them all some beer.
When they let me out they told me this: "If you want to keep away from here—CHORUS

3. The missus took me in a pub. The governor, Mister Hogg,
He stroked my ears. He give me a cake. He took me for a dog.
A p'liceman stopping traffic shouted out with all his might:
"Look out! Here comes the North Pole with the top half(?) all alight."
My wife said that my napper's like a sieve. "It's full of little holes, I'll bet.
When it rains, it will let the water in, and then your feet will both get wet. CHORUS


[* The official title, according to the sheet music and the original recording, uses the spelling "balmy" but the word is pronounced "barmy" and the song is often incorrectly referred to with that spelling.

[Cady = hat; napper = head; on the mash = on a spree, drinking.]


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Subject: RE: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 03 Feb 11 - 02:03 AM

Good luck with your venture Harry Champion had a massive repertoire. One of the problems with transcribing from recordings is that he had a tendency to change/improvise the words, so what you hear may be different to the published text.

I'd offer copies of sheet music versions that I have, but my collection is pretty inaccessible at the moment - it has been for about 3 years.


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Subject: RE: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: Brakn
Date: 03 Feb 11 - 04:54 AM

re "Never let your braces dangle"

I reckon you've got your work cut out Jim.
According to this page it's textoleet not text so neat. I reckon you've probably seen that already and that's why it's in bold type.

Quite a task!

Best of luck Jim.


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Subject: RE: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Feb 11 - 10:21 AM

I read the remarks about "textoleet" and I am highly skeptical. The writer seems confident that he knows the correct spelling, meaning, and etymology of "textoleet" although he admits, "I can find no reference anywhere to this slang word, it is as if the dictionary compilers have never listened to Harry Champion sing the song." Later he calls it a "despicable omission."

I'm quite certain that no dictionary editor would accept a word for inclusion based on one occurrence only, or based only on oral (as opposed to printed) sources, let alone a recording as indistinct as this one.

Furthermore, the writer's transcription is questionable in several other places. He has "Betsy's chairs" where I hear "beds and chairs." (Who the hell is Betsy? She is not mentioned anywhere else.)

To be fair, I must admit that I accepted—tentatively—the blogger's transcription in several other places where I had no idea what Champion was singing.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BEAVER (HERE COMES OLD BEAVER)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Feb 11 - 11:50 AM

You can hear this recording at YouTube. It is the first of two songs in that "video."

BEAVER (HERE COMES OLD BEAVER)
Words by George Crump and Neil McKay; music by Will Hyde
As sung by Harry Champion, 1922.

1. Ever since the day that I was twenty-one,
My long whiskers fairly took the bun.
All the girls they make a fuss of me
'Cause my whiskers tickle 'em, you see.
Whenever I walk out,
The girls they laugh and shout:

CHORUS: "Here comes old Beaver, Beaver, Beaver, Beaver."
All the little kids begin to shout:
"Hi, hi, hi! Does your mother know you're out?
He must be robbin' the barber, but he don't look worth a stiver.*
Baa, baa, black sheep, have you any wool? Here comes old Beaver."

2. To a football match I went the other day,
Just to see the Spurs and the Chelsea play.
When I got there, strike me up a tree,
They asked me for to be the referee.
The crowd when me they saw,
They laughed and with a roar: CHORUS

3. Th' other day Lloyd George sent a note to me,
Asked me to go away and have a cup of tea.
Off I went dressed up in my best,
With my whiskers dangling on my chest.
When Megan** stuck at me,
She laughed, "Ha-ha! Hee-hee!"

* Pronounced "steever." ** Lloyd George had a daughter named Megan.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HAVE YOU PAID THE RENT? (from H Champion)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Feb 11 - 11:54 AM

You can hear this song at YouTube. It is the second of two songs in that "video."


HAVE YOU PAID THE RENT?
Words by Herbert Rule & Fred Holt; music by L. Silberman.
As sung by Harry Champion, 1922.

1. Ev'rybody seems to be in trouble nowadays.
Trouble comes to all of us in many diff'rent ways.
Ev'rywhere you go,
You'll hear a tale of woe.
The butcher wants to meet you and the baker wants his dough.*
But there's one thing no one ever wants to pay.
That is why this is the latest saying of the day:

CHORUS: Have you paid the rent? Have you paid the rent?
Lordy, lordy, lordy, have you paid the rent?
Here's a wrinkle when the landlord is about:
Send the kiddies down to say that mother says she's out.
Have you paid the rent? Have you paid the rent?
Never, never, never lie.
If you haven't paid the rent,
One day you'll repent,
And you won't go to heaven when you die.

2. Charlie Brown was bathing in the sea and caught the cramp—
Silly thing to do because the water was so damp.
Charlie shouted, "Oh!"
Lobster caught his toe.
Charlie threw his arms up and he disappeared below.
Then the p'liceman came and, as he made a look,
Said to Charlie Brown as he pulled out his little book: CHORUS

3. Johnson's got a nice house with no knocker on the door.
Got no door to hang a blessed knocker on, and lor!
No more roof remains,
And though he still complains,
He has his dinner underneath the table when it rains.
And the neighbour's children make young Johnson swear,
Shouting through the keyhole of the door that isn't there: CHORUS


* A couple of bad puns are concealed in this line.


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Subject: Lyr Add: IN MY OLD WHITE SPATS (Harry Champion)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 09:12 PM

This recording was unusually clear, so I think my transcription has it nailed.

You can hear this song at YouTube. It's the first of 2 songs on that "video."


IN MY OLD WHITE SPATS (1925)
As recorded by Harry Champion

1. These spats that I'm a-wearing, they belong to Uncle Joe.
I put 'em on just to make a bit o' show.
He went and kicked the bucket just a month or two ago.
He left 'em in his will to me.

CHORUS: In my old white spats I walk along the street,
Walk along the street with my old white spats on,
Round the houses, in me flannel trousers,
In me old half-crown straw hat on,
And the kids all cry as I pass by,
"High-diddly-eye-die comes another guy,
Harold with his old white spats on."

2. Once every year just to pass the time away,
I go down to Brighton just to spend a holiday,
And with the girls there fairly hold the sway,
They take me for the king of Spain. CHORUS

3. Now I bought a turkey, I did, the other day,
Had it for our dinner straightaway.
When I got it done, they shouted out, "Hooray!"
The turkey laid an egg and cried: CHORUS


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Subject: Lyr Add: I WANT MEAT (from Harry Champion)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 09:14 PM

This recording was unusually clear, so I think my transcription has it nailed.

You can hear this song at YouTube. It's the second of 2 songs on that "video."


I WANT MEAT (1925)
As recorded by Harry Champion

1. I'm very fond of what I like, and what I like, I like.
When they tell me to eat more fruit, my inside goes on strike.
The roast beef of old England's good enough for me today,
And when my dinner time comes round, you're sure to hear me say:

CHORUS: I want meat. I want meat,
Meat, meat, meat, meat, meat.
I like it cold. I like it hot,
Like it in a stew in the old Dutch pot,
Leg of pork, a leg o' lamb,
Juicy steak and a slice of ham.
I don't want fruit from Alabam'.
I want meat, meat, meat.

2. Now when the world was plotted out, and Noah built the ark,
He didn't take his animals inside just for a lark.
He knew the grub to live on. He knew it wasn't fruit.
Each mealtime when it came around, you'd hear the fam'ly hoot: CHORUS

3. Now who wants a banana when he's worked for eight long hours?
It's just like feeding tigers on a little bunch of flowers.
Just fancy training boxers on an apple grape or plum!
One punch in the larder would send him to Kingdom Come. CHORUS


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Subject: Lyr Add: EVERYWHERE YOU GO YOU'LL FIND A SOLDIER
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Feb 11 - 09:12 AM

This song was the B side to the updated WW2 version of ANY OLD IRON. I don't know whether this song had an earlier version.

You can hear this song at YouTube. I think my transcription is fairly accurate.


EVERYWHERE YOU GO YOU'LL FIND A SOLDIER (1940)

SPOKEN: Army!

1. I don't care what you say. I'm laughing night and day.
Has anyone got the wind up? Oh, I met them right away.
You want to be prepared, and know just how to act,
And don't you worry about the war; old England can't be whacked.

CHORUS: 'Cause everywhere you go, everywhere you go,
Everywhere you go you'll find *a soldier* everywhere.
Underneath the arches, round Trafalgar Square,
Eyes left, eyes right, you'll find them everywhere.
And we're all satisfied they're helping us over the tide,
Whether the boys be over here or over the other side.
They're out to win the war like their father did before,
'Cause everywhere you go, you'll find *a soldier*.

SPOKEN: Navy!

2. My poor old Uncle Ted, he's over stuck in bed
He's had the gout and ain't been out for forty years, he said.
I humped him on me back today and showed him round about.
He quite enjoyed his piggyback and kept on singing out:

REPEAT CHORUS, SUBSTITUTING "a sailor" FOR "a soldier."

SPOKEN: Air Force!

3. The kiddies down our street know kids they won't be beat.
With their hobnailed boots and old tin hats, their army is complete.
They walk about with wooden swords round ev'ry thoroughfare.
Me youngest one's a sergeant and you ought to hear him swear!

REPEAT CHORUS, SUBSTITUTING "an airman" FOR "a soldier."


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Subject: RE: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 26 Feb 11 - 07:19 PM

These are all the titles I've been able to find of songs that Harry Champion supposedly recorded. I say "supposedly" because I created this list by merging several lists that I found at various places on the Internet; obviously, some of those sources are more reliable (but probably less complete) than others. Where Mudcat has a thread about a song, I have converted the thread title to a link. All links go to other Mudcat threads.

A Good Blow Out for 4d [Fourpence]
A Little Bit of Cucumber
A Member of the Force
A Natty Little Patch Behind
All the Dogs Went Bow-Wow-Wow
All Wobberlee
Any Old Iron
Any Old Thing Will Do
Are You Sure You've Had Enough?
As Large as Life in the Harem
Aunt Tilly
Beaver (Here Comes Old Beaver) – see this thread (above)
Belle of the Barbers' Ball
Billy Green Pc
Boiled Beef and Carrots
Brenda the Barberous [sic?]
Brown, Brown, Sit Down
Carroty (C-A-R-R-O-T-Y)
Cockney Bill of London Town
Come With Me down Regent Street
Cover it Over Quick, Jemima
Daisy, What "Daisy Roots"!
Dick, Dick, With Your Walking Stick
Doctor Shelley
Don't Do It Again, Matilda
Don't Get the Wind Up, Walter!
Down Came the Blind
Down Fell the Pony in a Fit
Everybody Knows Me in My Old Brown Hat
Everywhere You Go You'll Find a Soldier – see this thread (above)
Father Looked Funny
Ginger, You're Balmy! – see this thread (above)
Good Old Yorkshire Pudding
Grow Some 'Taters
Hanging 'Em Out to Dry
Have a Drop of Gin, Joe
Have You Paid the Rent? – see this thread (above)
Here Comes Old Father Christmas
Hey Diddle Diddle
Home Made Sausages
Hot Meat Pies, Saveloys and Trotters
How Are You Mother?
I Didn't Get a Wink All Night
I Enjoyed It
I Must Have a Feather in My Hat
I Ought to Be Punished
I See You've Got Your Old Brown Hat On
I Shan't Mend Your Waistcoat Any More
I Skedaddled
I Want Meat – see this thread (above)
I Was Holding My Coconut
I'm Getting Ready for My Mother-in-Law
I'm Henery the Eighth, I Am
I'm Proud of My Old Bald Head
I'm Proud to Be a Cockney
I'm Selling Up the 'Appy 'Appy 'Ome
I'm Sweating on My Old Selinda
I'm William the Conqueror
In My Old White Spats – see this thread (above)
In the World Turned Upside Down
In Training
It's Cold Without Your Trousers
Keep On! Keep On! Keep On!
Keep Your Hands in Your Trousers Pockets
Let 'Em All Go
Let Me Alone, I'm Busy
Let's Have a Basin of Soup
Mr Knick-Knock
Mr Piper Give Us a Pipe o' Bacca
My Diary
My Heart's Good, But My Feet Won't Let Me
My Old Iron Cross
My Poor Heart Went "Pitter-Patter"
My Ragtime Missus
My Wife's Sister's Pussy Cat
Nan! Nan! Nan!
Never Let Your Braces Dangle – See this thread (above)
Not Much
Oh Ladies
Oh!!!
On the Mediterranean
On Top!
Original Shimmy-Fox
Out Went the Gas
PC Green
Pip-Ip
Pom-Tiddley-Om-Pom! Hi! Hi! Hi!
Red, White and Blue
Right on My Doo-Dah
Robin Redbreast
Samuel Duff
Standard Bread
Tally-Owe, the Tallyman
Taters
That Funny Little Bob-Tail Coat
That Gorgonzola Cheese
The Best That Money Can Buy
The End of My Old Cigar
The Girl with the Golden Hair
The Longer You Linger
The Old Dun Cow Caught Fire
The Old High Hat That I Was Married In
The Old Red Lion
The Original Jazz-Jazz Dance
The Ragtime Ragshop
The Thirsty Man
There Ain't No Bones in Beer
They Won't Move at All
Timothy Let's Have a Look
Toasted Cheese on Toast
Two, Two, Tooty-Two
What a Mouth
What Ho My Old Sport
When Are You Going to Stop?
When I Do Begin
Where's My Pianner?
While I Was Licking My Stamp
Who Says London Ain't the Country?
Wotcher, My Old Brown Son
Yer 'At Don't Fit Yer Very Well!
Yiddle on Your Fiddle
You Can't Help Laughing, Can Yer?
You Can't Judge a Woman by Her Clothes
You Don't Want to Keep On Showing It
You Ought to See the Missus in a Harem Skirt


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Subject: RE: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: GUEST,GOM
Date: 04 Mar 11 - 07:35 AM

Great effort here. My 2d worth;
The last two lines of Ginger You're Barmy are surely;
"Pies must have a little bit of crust. Why don't you wear a cady?
If you want to be a don, you want a bit of something on. To take off to a lady!"

Prety clear from my recording.Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: DOWN FELL THE PONY IN A FIT
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 07:46 PM

DOWN FELL THE PONY IN A FIT
Words and music by Harry Wincott and Harry Leighton
London : Reeder & Walsh, ©1897
Transcribed from Mr John Rutland's performance as recorded on the CD "Players Joys"

The wife and me and all the family
Thought we'd have a spree one night.
We went out, looking round about
And we were alright.
I said, "Bet, let's hire a waggonette,
Give the kids a country drive."
She said, "Dan(?),
Won't it be some fun.
Bless my heart alive."
Off I went and got a natty lot
And inside the family all got,
But when we drove about ten miles
You shoulda seen our bloomin' dials.

Down fell the pony in a fit
Then the waggonette broke down.
"The pony's dead!" my old woman said,
"We'll have to tramp it back to town."
"No! No! No! No!" everybody cried,
"It's too far to roam!"
So we 'arnessed me ol' girl in between the shafts
And we made 'er pull the whole lot 'ome.

[Spoken] She didn't like it one little bit you know. Funny woman.

We made her trot just like an 'ottentot,
Wid the blinkers round 'er eyes.
The bit, oh lor,
We stuck it in 'er jaw,
It was just 'er size.
All the down the street
Upon 'er hands and feet
She pulled the waggonette all day.
Take my tip
When I gave 'er the whip
The kids, they yelled, "Hooray!"
At the 'orses trough I let 'er stop.
Took the bridle off and let 'er mop
When we got home there was some wars
We 'ad a fight and all because

Down fell the pony in a fit
Then the waggonette broke down
"The pony's dead!" my old woman said,
"We'll have to tramp it back to town."
"No! No! No! No!" everybody cried,
"It's too far to roam!"
So we 'arnessed me ol' girl in between the shafts
And we made 'er pull the whole lot 'ome.

Yes we made 'er pull the whole lot,
Made 'er pull the whole lot,
Made 'er pull the whole lot,
You should 'ave 'eard the language,
Made 'er pull the whole lot 'ome.


John Rutland can be seen as Harry Champion on the DVD A little of what you fancy (opens in a new window).

He performs part of this song and part (I assume) of another which I guess may have been a Harry Champion song sing too. I'll put the words for that in another reply...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: chrisgl
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 08:07 PM

Bother! I didn't spot my cookie had gorn stale.
So the previous post with "Down fell the pony" was me!!

And here's the other lyric...


Saturday
Transcribed from Mr John Rutland's performance as recorded on the DVD A little of what you fancy

[SPOKEN]
There's one day a week when we feel a bit gay
That's Saturday! (Saturday)
When we get our wages it's all "Hip hooray!"
On Saturday! (Saturday)
You go all the week pr'aps and can't get a sub
But the day comes at last when your rofeties you rub
And directly you get's it you're off to a pub
On Saturday!

[SUNG]
Oh Saturday! That's the day for me!
We have a fair old beano and we spend our L. S. D.
On Monday morning we are always B. R. O. K. E...
Oh Saturday! That's the day for me!

[SPOKEN]
It's wonderful now what some women will do
On Saturday! (Saturday)
They can't only jaw, they do something else too
On Saturday! (Saturday)
Give the missus four bob, set 'er off round the town
She'll turn all the butchers' shops clean upside down
And she'll get the weeks grub for about half-a-crown
On Saturday!

[SUNG]
Oh Saturday! That's the day for me!
We have a fair old beano and we spend our L. S. D.
On Monday morning we are always B. R. O. K. E...
Oh Saturday! That's the day for me!

Oh Saturday! That's the day for me!
We have a fair old beano and we spend our L. S. D.
On Monday morning we are always B. R. O. K. E...
Oh Saturday! That's the day for me!

Oh Saturday! Lovely lovely Saturday!
Saturday!
That's the day for me!

Notes
I can find no internet reference to this song at all, but that's probably not to be surprised - There's bare mention of "The Finest Flow Of Langwidge Ever 'eard" (not one of Harry's)

rofeties rofe = four pence (4d), backslang, also meaning a four year prison term, which usage dates back to the mid-1800s.
My guess is that it means wages, coins to rub together and is related to the phrase "not have two pennies to rub together.

Performance notes:
(Saturday) is sung as response by the others on stage.
L. S. D. and B. R. O. K. E. are said as letters.



Now (and this is slightly off topic...) has anyone got lyrics and music for these two songs that Gus Elen used to perform:
"It's A Marvel How 'e Doos It But 'e Do!"
and
"But That's Nothing"


chris :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: chrisgl
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 08:18 PM

Re: "Ginger, You're balmy"

It would seem that it jolly well ought to be "barmy" since that NOW means insane or stupid where balmy (NOW) means pleasant without extremes.

BUT balmy USED to have the same meaning as barmy...


These archaic usages and words drive me up the wall. I have Charles Coburn singing
He'd never round upon a pal
Unless it filled his gick

Gick? Gick! What on earth is "gick"?


chris :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Music-hall songs sung by Harry Champion
From: GUEST,joolz
Date: 06 Oct 12 - 05:08 PM

In 'braces' he's saying that the rug (a flat man) doesn't look like a normal rug:

Mrs Murphy's got a mat
'T ain't the skin of some tomcat.
On the floor it looks no doubt
Like a man's been flattened out.


'Spats' uses an expression that was around at the time:

"Hi-tiddly-i-ti comes another guy,

In 'I want Meat' Noah built the ark because of the flood.

Now when the world was flooded out, and Noah built the ark,

(also I hear hotpot instead of Dutch pot but I'm not 100%)


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Subject: Lyr Add: GROW SOME 'TATERS'
From: keberoxu
Date: 19 Jul 16 - 03:24 PM

GROW SOME 'TATERS'

[Fred Murray, words and music]

Down our little alley we've been very busy
Fourteen youngsters and myself and my old girl named Lizzie
We've all got picks and in the yard we throw ourselves about
And when the neighbours stare at us we look at them and shout

CHORUS
Let's all be busy
      All be busy
Don't look sad and don't look glum
      As if you're going to Kingdom come
Dress up like a farmer's boy in corduroys and gaiters
      Dig up all your old backyards and grow some blooming taters

We've got taters sprouting up and other things are coming
Round the dust-hole every day the bumblebees are humming
My old girl she has been and got a special strain of greens
They're growing round the window sill with turnip tops and beans

CHORUS

Taters they were getting scarce and folks I had to warn 'em
They'll be worth their weight in gold and then we'll start to pawn 'em
The lot I've got are fine and large, all growing through the ruts
And if I stick some hair on them they'll sell like coconuts

© Francis, Day & Hunter Ltd., London
No date is offered, except:
"Above written and sung during the first World War, 1914 - 1918."

Reprinted with permission (acknowledged in two places) on page 83,
The Anthology of the Potato
edited by Robert McKay
Dublin: Allen Figgis & Co., Ltd., for the Irish Potato Marketing Company, Ltd. 1961


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