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Lyr Req: 1942 Turkey in the Straw (Carson Robison)

DigiTrad:
BALLAD OF CHARLIE BIRGER
GOIN' BACK TO WHERE I CAME FROM
LIFE GETS TEEJUS, DON'T IT?
THE ALTOONA FREIGHT WRECK
THE SCOPES TRIAL
THE WANDERER'S WARNING
WRECK OF 1256
ZEB TOURNEY'S GIRL


Related threads:
ADD: The Wanderer's Warning (26)
Help: Goin' Back To Where I Come From (26)
Review: Carson Robison Buckaroos in movie short (4)
Lyr/Chords Req: Little Green Valley (C Robison) (7)


kendall 05 Jan 12 - 09:54 AM
Joe Offer 05 Jan 12 - 03:30 PM
Joe Offer 05 Jan 12 - 03:55 PM
Joe Offer 05 Jan 12 - 08:12 PM
Barbara 05 Jan 12 - 08:28 PM
pdq 05 Jan 12 - 08:29 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Oct 13 - 12:57 AM
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Subject: WW 2 song
From: kendall
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 09:54 AM

I've been watching the Military channel and today a song I used to hear during WW 2 crossed my mind.
    Adolph Hitler grabbed a tail
    He hung right on like a ten penny nail
    He saw what he had and he began to swear
    On the end of that tail was a Russian Bear.

    The Bear started to growl, started to shake
    Adolph knew he'd made a mistake
    Tried to hang on and tried to let go
    Now they got a little dance called "Hitler in the snow."

    Soldiers sailors pilots Marines
    Tall ones, short ones lots in between
    Kick 'em in the pants sock 'em in the jaw
    Teach 'em how to dance to the Turkey in the straw.

Anyone else remember this? Doug?


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Subject: RE: WW 2 song - Adolf Hitler grabbed a tail
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 03:30 PM

Hi, Kendall -
There's a little more at http://www.disneyshorts.org/shorts.aspx?shortID=359. It's a discussion of the Disney cartoon of the Spike Jones song Der Fuehrer's Face, but it has a nice comment about this song:

    From Val Don Hickerson: I saw the original cartoon (Der Fuehrer's Face) preceding a movie at the Strand Theater in Seaside, Oregon in 1943 while still a junior in high-school. I also saw a short subject showing Spike Jones and the City Slickers playing the title song. I don't remember if it was shown several months before the comedy or after.

    The next year I was in the US Army Air Force. We sang that song often to boost our morale. It helped to make fun of a viscious enemy who was trying to dominate the world along with Italy and Japan. What current generations don't realize was how deadly those enemies were, nor how successful they had been during the first few years. We literally had our backs to the wall as they were advancing on every front. Songs and cartoons like Der Fuehrer's Face were a great help to keep your spirits up when you knew that any moment may be your last. An estimated 60-million people died on both sides including nearly 400,000 Americans - and nine in my little town os Seaside, Oregon (Population about 2,000).


    Another song that we sang at that time went something like this:
      Now Adolf Hitler grabbed a tail,
      And he hung right on with tooth and nail,
      When he saw what he had he began to swear,
      On the end of the tail was a Russian bear,
      The old bear growled and started in to shake,
      And Adolf knew he'd made a big mistake.
      He tried to hang on and he tried to let go,
      Now they do a new dance called Hitler in the snow.

      I saw Musselini sitting on a log
      All puffed up like a great big frog,
      I snuck up close and poked him with a wire,
      And he just went poof like an old flat tire.

    There was a verse about Tojo that I don't remember. Anyway, I would give the cartoon and the song a ten plus. They sure helped us during very trying, stressful times. By war's end I was studying Japanese radio intercept code for the invasion of the Japanese mainland. Thank God the war ended before we had to go. I was 19-years-old.

    From John McShane : My comments are not about this Disney film but rather directed to a gentleman who did make some comments - namely Val Don Hickerson. In his comments he mentioned another song that he sang towards the end of the war. For his information the following are the complete words to this song which was sang to the tune of "Turkey in the Straw" My thanks to him because for fifty years I have been trying to find somebody who had heard this song but with no luck. In fact I was beginning to think that it was a figment of my imagination but I am sure that at the age of 8 years I didn't (nor do I now) have the talent to make up the words. Following are the complete words to this song as I remember them:

      Oh, Adolph Hitler grabbed a tail
      He hung right on with a tooth and nail
      Then he saw what he had and began to swear
      On that tail was a Russian bear .

      The old bear growled and started in to shake
      Adolph knew he'd made a big mistake
      So he tried to hang on and he tried to let go
      Now they do a new dance called "Hitler in the Snow."

      Well I saw Mussoline sitting on a log
      All puffed up like a great big frog
      So I sneaked up behind him and I stuck him with a wire
      He just went poof like an old flat tire .

      I took his hide and I hung it on a tree
      The tree said hey don't you do that to me
      So I took it home to my mother-in-law
      And she threw it out with the turkey in the straw.

      A monkey and a baboon were sitting on a rail
      Feeling mighty sad and looking kinda pale
      A little yellow rat came sneaking around a weed
      The monkey yelled, "Hey there's the guy we need."

      The rat sat up and they all begin to grin
      Along came a fellow with whiskers on his chin
      He kicked at the rail and broke it with a crack
      And that was the end of the Three Power Pack.

    Now if I can just find out who the artist was that sang the song I would be happy.


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Subject: Carson Robison (1890-1957)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 03:55 PM

Seems to me that we need a thread for information about Carson Robison. Here's an article I came across that's worth a look.

New York Daily News:

New York Country Boy Goes to War


FIGHTIN' SIDE. A
BY DAVID HINCKLEY
Tuesday, July 05, 2005

THE COUNTRY music world, the one where every band had at least one fiddle player and the audiences came by the muck on their boots honestly, never embraced Carson Robison.

A lot of that world thought Robison, like his mentor Vernon Dalhart, was New York's idea of country music, stilted pop songs that had no real country heart.

If this bothered Robison, he didn't let on. Born in Kansas in 1890, he moved East in 1924, just as electronic recording was about to make phonograph records a boom industry and radio was taking off as a nationwide vehicle to promote them. With a pleasant voice and a gift for writing and singing simple, hummable songs, Robison recorded hundreds of records, some with Dalhart and more on his own. He was regularly on New York radio in the '20s and '30s, mixing folksy pop songs like "Hallelujah I'm a Bum" with reworked versions of novelties like "Barnacle Bill the Sailor" and actual country songs like "That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine."

All this earned him a modest following among some country fans down South and in the Midwest, though more often fans wondered why anyone would listen to Carson Robison when Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys were out there.

But Robison had one other trick, which he'd picked up from Dalhart. He wrote and sang topical songs. If someone died in a mine cave-in, Robison could write, record and release a song about it within days.

This was a talent that would pay off big after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

WITH THE nation united behind something much bigger than the definition of real country music, Robison was suddenly on the front lines. Just 11 days after Pearl, he was in the studio with a six-piece band to record four songs he thought captured the mood of the nation.
    Remember Pearl Harbor
    When you sight down the barrel of your gun
    Never stop till you've dropped every one ...

"Remember Pearl Harbor" wasn't "Star Dust," but it made its point. So did the catchily titled "We're Gonna Have to Zap the Dirty Little Jap (And Uncle Sam Is Just the One to Do It)"
    The Japs and all their hooey
    Will be changed into chop suey
    And the Rising Sun will set
    When we get through with it ...

Other writers would soon jump in with better songs, from the gospel-inspired "Coming In on a Wing and a Prayer" or "Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition" to the clever "G.I. Jive" and yearning ballads like "Long Ago and Far Away" or "I'll Walk Alone."

Robison didn't care. His currency, besides speed, was outrage and mockery, and his access to New York studios enabled him to keep coming back with more.

In February 1942, he resurrected Barnacle Bill for a new adventure called "Here I Go to Tokio":
    All I need is my old brass knucks,
    Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
    I'll go through Japan like a fine-toothed comb
    Bounce my fist off-a Hitler's dome
    And puncture that windbag that lives in Rome ...

In "Turkey in the Straw 1942," he expressed the same confidence in our Soviet allies:

Adolf Hitler grabbed a tail ...
At the end of the tail was a Russian bear
The old bear growled and started in to shake
He tried to hang on, then he tried to let go
Now they got a new dance called Hitler in the Snow
As the war moved along, Robison got the idea of having Axis leaders Hitler, Mussolini and Hirohito exchange worried letters about their impending defeat. "Hirohito's Letter to Hitler" in April 1945 went like this:
    There's one other problem that hurts me
    It's known as the B-29
    And what do they mean by the eight-ball
    They say that they have us behind
    Please pardon my asking these questions
    But I can't help wondering now
    If you stayed too long in that Beer Hall
    And miscalculated somehow

On the other side was "Hitler's Last Letter to Hirohito," written as a reply:
    I just got your letter, Hirohito
    It reached me where I'm hiding in
    I don't have a Berlin post office
    In fact, there just ain't no Berlin
    So if I should suffer reversals,
    And frankly, I look for the worst
    I'll head for my fort in the mountains
    If Himmler don't bump me off first
    Why don't you review your great navy
    'Twill boost your morale, I'm sure
    Just borrow a suit from a diver
    And you'll have an int'resting tour

By war's end, Carson Robison was 55 years old and bigger than ever.
HE RETURNED to novelty songs, getting his biggest hit in 1948 with a semirecitation called "Life Gets Tee-Jus, Don't It?" And he remained a New York country boy, eventually settling up the Hudson.

He died in 1957. Despite several nominations, so far he hasn't made it into the Country Music Hall of Fame.


See Richard (Richie) Matteson's Carson Robison / Vernon Dalhart biographies at http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/home.aspx


Another reference at Google Books


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Subject: ADD: 1942 Turkey in the Straw (Robison)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 08:12 PM

I found a recording of the song on Spotify.com:

1942 TURKEY IN THE STRAW
(Carson Robison)

Oh, Adolph Hitler grabbed a tail
He hung right on with tooth and nail
Then he saw what he had, and he began to swear
On the end of that tail was a Russian bear.
The old bear growled and started in to shake
Adolph knew he'd made a mistake
He tried to hang on and he tried to let go
Now they have a new dance called "Hitler in the Snow."

Oh, I saw Mussolini setting on a log
All puffed up like a great big frog
I sneaked up close and stuck him with a wire
He just went 'pfft' like an old flat tire.
I took his hide and I hung it on a tree
The tree said, "Hey don't do that to me!"
So I took it on home to my mother-in-law
And she threw me outside with the Turkey in the Straw.

Oh, a monkey and a baboon setting on a rail
Feeling mighty bad and looking kinda pale
A little yellow rat come sneaking 'round the weed
The monkey said, "Look, there's the guy we need."
The rat climbed up and they all begin to grin
Along come a feller with whiskers on his chin
He kicked that rail and broke it with a crack
And that was the last of the Three Power Pact.

Oh, the frost was on the pumpkin and the fog was in the shock,
And the Yanks are a-movin and they're packing up the fock (?)
The sheep are in the meadow and the cows are in the corn,
There's gonna be a scrap, just as sure as you're born.
Soldiers, sailors, pilots, Marines,
Tall ones, short ones, lots of in-betweens,
Powder in their guns and sand's in the craw (?)
Steppin to the tune of Turkey in the Straw.

Oh, swing your partner, here we go,
To Berlin, Rome and a-Tokyo.
We'll put 'em in a sack and give it a swish,
Throw 'em in the river and kill all the fish.
Tie 'em to a rope and give 'em a swing,
Just like a monkey on the end of a swing,
Kick 'em in the pants sock 'em in the jaw
Teach 'em how to dance old Turkey in the straw.

(to part B)
Four hand, brown hand, everybody shout, (?)
Skunk in the woodpile, gotta chase him out,
Adolf Hitler bit off a chaw
Jam it down his throat with Turkey in the straw.


YouTube Recording

http://www.archive.org/details/1942TurkeyInTheStraw

As you can see, this transcription is a little "iffy." Please post corrections below, and I'll add the ones that make sense.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: WW 2 song - 1942 Turkey in the Straw (Robison)
From: Barbara
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 08:28 PM

This line is almost right --
Powder in their guns and sand's in the craw (?)
Probably "sand's in their craw"
Having sand in your craw is like having gumption or grit -- craw is a gizzard or crop and sand helps the bird grind up the food to digest it.
Blessings
Barbara


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Subject: RE: WW 2 song - 1942 Turkey in the Straw (Robison)
From: pdq
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 08:29 PM

During WWII Carson Robison wrote the song "We're Gonna Have To Slap The Dirty Little Jap".

In 1952 Robison recorded another of his compositions "I'm No Communist".

These are some of his song that rub some folks the wrong way. That is why Robison is not in the Country Music Hall of Fame. He deserves that honor for his fine writing, singing and excellent instrumental work.


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Subject: RE: WW II song - 1942 Turkey in the Straw (Robison)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Oct 13 - 12:57 AM

Here are a few corrections:

Oh, the frost is on the pumpkin and the fodder's in the shock,
And the Yanks are a-movin' and they pack an awful sock.
The sheep are in the meadow and the cows are in the corn.
There's gonna be a scrap, just as sure as you're born.
Soldiers, sailors, pilots, Marines,
Tall ones, short ones, lots of in-betweens,
Powder in their guns and sand in the craw
Steppin' to the tune of Turkey in the Straw.

Oh, swing your partner, here we go,
To Berlin, Rome and Tokyo.
We'll put 'em in a sack and give 'em a swish,
Throw 'em in the river and kill all the fish.
Tie 'em to a rope and give 'em a swing,
Just like a monkey on the end of a string,
Kick 'em in the pants sock 'em in the jaw.
Teach 'em how to dance old turkey in the straw.

(to part B)
Four hands round and everybody shout,
Skunk in the woodpile, gotta kick him out,
Adolf Hitler bit off a chaw
Jam it down his throat with turkey in the straw.


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