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Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy

DigiTrad:
BLACK JACK DAVEY
BLACK JACK DAVY
BLACK JACK DAVY (IN ATLANTIC CITY)
BLACKJACK DAVEY (2)
BLACKJACK DAVID
CLAYTON BOONE
GYPSIE LADDIE
GYPSY DAVEY
GYPSY LADDIES
GYPSY ROVER
HARRISON BRADY
SEVEN GYPSIES ON YON HILL
THE GYPSY LADDIE
THE GYPSY LADDIE (4)
THE HIPPIES AND THE BEATNIKS
THE LADY AND THE GYPSY
THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSIES
WHEN CARNAL FIRST CAME TO ARKANSAS


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Seven Yellow Gypsies (Dolores Keane) (8)
Chord Req:This version of Black Jack Davey (Heron) (13)
(origins) Origins: Clayton Boone (Child #200) (10)
Lyr Req: Gipsy Countess (8)
Lyr Add: The wraggle taggle Gipsies, O! (16)
Lyr Req: Gypsy Davy (Doc and Richard Watson) (4)
Black Jack Davey Dylan (27)
Black Jack Davy - origin of phrase? (26)
Lyr Req: Hippies and the Beatniks (Miles Wootton) (28)
Origins of raggle-taggle (9)
Lyr Req: The Gypsy Laddie (Tannahill Weavers) (10)
Chord Req: gypsy davy (3)
Lyr Req: Gypsy Laddie (Jean Redpath #200) (8)
Lyr Req: Black Jack Davy (Sheila Kay Adams #200) (6)
Lyr Req: Raggle taggle gypsy (26)
Tune Req: jeannie robertson's gypsy laddies (3)
Lyr Req: Raggle Taggle Gypsie 'O (12)
Tune Req: Raggle Taggle Gypsy Oh ! (7)
looking for Johnny Faw songs (Johnny Faa) (8)
Lyr Req: Gypsies (Cathal McConnell, Child #200) (4)
Help: History of Blackjack David-y-ey (30)
Lyr Req: Wraggle Taggle Gypsy (10)
(origins) Origin: Raggle-Taggle Gypsy (6)
Wraggle Taggle Gypsies in translation (1)


Ran Coleman 25 May 97 - 03:49 PM
H. Burhans 25 May 97 - 04:45 PM
Barry Finn 25 May 97 - 07:58 PM
Petra (pacosgrove@fortlewis.edu) 26 May 97 - 06:23 PM
Peter Timmerman 26 May 97 - 09:10 PM
Paul Kennedy 16 Jun 97 - 05:21 PM
Ran Coleman 16 Jun 97 - 09:33 PM
Coralena 17 Jun 97 - 11:49 AM
Gene Graham 17 Jun 97 - 12:06 PM
dick greenhaus 17 Jun 97 - 03:38 PM
Una Grey 17 Jun 97 - 03:41 PM
Susan of DT 17 Jun 97 - 07:53 PM
Ricky Rackin 17 Jun 97 - 09:19 PM
Rosslyn Clayton 19 Jun 97 - 04:58 AM
Rosslyn Clayton 19 Jun 97 - 05:16 AM
Bo 20 Jun 97 - 01:19 PM
Alan of Australia 20 Jun 97 - 07:02 PM
Ran Coleman 22 Jun 97 - 12:20 AM
LaMarca 25 Jun 97 - 02:25 PM
LaMarca 25 Jun 97 - 02:31 PM
kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org 26 Jun 97 - 02:33 PM
GUEST 10 Mar 00 - 12:54 PM
Uncle_DaveO 10 Mar 00 - 01:37 PM
kendall 10 Mar 00 - 02:05 PM
GeorgeH 10 Mar 00 - 02:07 PM
kendall 10 Mar 00 - 02:09 PM
Elektra 10 Mar 00 - 03:11 PM
Gypsy 10 Mar 00 - 04:25 PM
Kim C 10 Mar 00 - 04:50 PM
Willie-O 10 Mar 00 - 05:39 PM
rangeroger 10 Mar 00 - 10:00 PM
Malcolm Douglas 11 Mar 00 - 12:30 AM
roopoo 11 Mar 00 - 01:27 AM
GUEST 11 Mar 00 - 09:18 PM
Art Thieme 11 Mar 00 - 10:54 PM
raredance 12 Mar 00 - 12:33 AM
Mark Cohen 12 Mar 00 - 01:58 AM
Art Thieme 12 Mar 00 - 11:03 AM
raredance 12 Mar 00 - 11:43 AM
Mark Cohen 12 Mar 00 - 06:00 PM
Mark Cohen 12 Mar 00 - 06:04 PM
GUEST 13 Mar 00 - 11:17 AM
GUEST,Tommy Mooney 13 Mar 00 - 03:10 PM
Bearheart 25 Jul 00 - 11:37 PM
Trevor 31 Jul 00 - 03:10 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 31 Jul 00 - 03:41 PM
oggie 31 Jul 00 - 04:12 PM
GUEST,David E. Siegel (Siegel@acm.org) 31 Jul 00 - 04:20 PM
Alice 10 Aug 01 - 11:13 PM
masato sakurai 11 Aug 01 - 12:02 AM
masato sakurai 11 Aug 01 - 01:33 AM
pavane 11 Aug 01 - 04:27 AM
ard mhacha 11 Aug 01 - 08:11 AM
Peg 11 Aug 01 - 02:10 PM
Mudlark 11 Aug 01 - 03:21 PM
Malcolm Douglas 11 Aug 01 - 07:50 PM
pavane 12 Aug 01 - 05:59 AM
ard mhacha 12 Aug 01 - 07:29 AM
Garry Gillard 13 Aug 01 - 04:17 AM
Garry Gillard 13 Aug 01 - 04:20 AM
Mark Cohen 13 Aug 01 - 06:59 AM
GUEST,harryrages@onetel.net.uk 13 Aug 01 - 08:46 PM
GUEST,Cory Ducey 31 Jan 02 - 08:43 AM
NoMattch 01 Feb 02 - 11:56 AM
Desdemona 01 Feb 02 - 06:08 PM
WyoWoman 02 Feb 02 - 12:11 AM
Desdemona 02 Feb 02 - 12:06 PM
WyoWoman 02 Feb 02 - 01:37 PM
GUEST,riverdan 02 Mar 02 - 11:08 PM
Maryrrf 03 Mar 02 - 09:19 AM
Susanne (skw) 03 Mar 02 - 06:13 PM
bernil 03 Mar 02 - 06:20 PM
Maryrrf 03 Mar 02 - 09:03 PM
GUEST 09 Apr 02 - 01:22 PM
GUEST,Nerd 09 Apr 02 - 05:20 PM
IanC 10 Apr 02 - 05:08 AM
Malcolm Douglas 10 Apr 02 - 05:21 AM
GUEST,Nerd 10 Apr 02 - 02:08 PM
GUEST,Zorikh 15 Sep 02 - 03:39 PM
GUEST,johnnie 09 Oct 02 - 11:29 PM
GUEST,Jim Clark..London..England 10 Oct 02 - 08:38 PM
old moose 11 Oct 02 - 12:34 AM
MikeOQuinn 11 Oct 02 - 05:31 AM
Nerd 11 Oct 02 - 01:09 PM
belfast 12 Oct 02 - 08:24 AM
GUEST,Arne Langsetmo 12 Oct 02 - 01:16 PM
Desert Dancer 18 Mar 03 - 07:33 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Mar 03 - 07:52 PM
Desert Dancer 19 Mar 03 - 01:37 AM
open mike 19 Mar 03 - 02:34 AM
robinia 20 Mar 03 - 01:32 AM
Desert Dancer 21 Mar 03 - 01:21 AM
IanC 21 Mar 03 - 04:39 AM
GUEST,DeadMan 09 Mar 04 - 08:05 PM
Leadfingers 09 Mar 04 - 08:26 PM
hobbitwoman 09 Mar 04 - 09:14 PM
GUEST,stace 12 Jun 04 - 11:01 AM
GUEST 11 Sep 04 - 12:16 AM
Leadfingers 11 Sep 04 - 05:59 AM
Leadfingers 11 Sep 04 - 06:14 AM
GUEST 03 Oct 04 - 11:03 AM
The Fooles Troupe 04 Oct 04 - 12:54 AM
The Fooles Troupe 04 Oct 04 - 01:01 AM
unvarnished 12 Jan 07 - 12:07 PM
GUEST,Chris Smith 12 Jan 07 - 02:36 PM
GUEST 27 Apr 08 - 08:41 AM
pavane 28 Apr 08 - 05:41 AM
Saro 28 Apr 08 - 06:38 AM
Jim Dixon 24 Mar 09 - 11:36 AM
Terry McDonald 24 Mar 09 - 12:34 PM
GUEST,Thomas 28 Jul 09 - 12:32 PM
Diva 29 Jul 09 - 03:59 AM
Genie 26 Sep 09 - 12:53 PM
Reinhard 26 Sep 09 - 03:54 PM
GUEST 10 May 12 - 03:53 PM
GUEST,Amy 08 Sep 12 - 09:42 PM
Jim Carroll 10 Sep 12 - 06:42 AM
Ged Fox 10 Sep 12 - 02:31 PM
GUEST,Rob Currie 19 Sep 12 - 01:14 PM
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Subject: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Ran Coleman
Date: 25 May 97 - 03:49 PM

I have th words to this song that my mother used to sing, but I've never heard any reference to it from anyone else. Does anyone know of a good recording of the song? ran_coleman@juno.com


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: H. Burhans
Date: 25 May 97 - 04:45 PM

I had a recording of this tune on a Brother's Four album when I was in high school. Don't know the name of the album but I loved it at age 13 - I'm 42 now if that gives you an idea of the vintage! H.Burhans


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Barry Finn
Date: 25 May 97 - 07:58 PM

I think Sweeny's Men or the Bothy Band did a great recording of The Raggle Taggle Gypsy, years ago. It's in the database under Gypsy, you'll find The Gypsy Laddie (Johnny Faa- Child #200), Black Jack Davey and Gypsy Davey with some info. In 1624 a gypsy chieftain with the common Romany name, Johnny Faa was hung by Scottish officals. No connection was ever established between any gypsy and a wife of the Earl of Cassilis as recorded in song.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Petra (pacosgrove@fortlewis.edu)
Date: 26 May 97 - 06:23 PM

Ran -

It will be hard to find, but if you can find it, there is a band named "Shaman" that does an unbelievable version of it.. Unfortunately, I can't recal which album it's on.. :)

Good luck on your search! :)

Petra


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 26 May 97 - 09:10 PM

The first chapter of Nick Tosches wild book on the roots of country music "Country" is all about the history of this song through about 2000 years. He traces it back to the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice! Yours, Peter


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Paul Kennedy
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 05:21 PM

The Irish Descendants have a good version of The Raggle Taggle Gypsy on their album titled Gypsies & Lovers.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Ran Coleman
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 09:33 PM

Thanks to all of you for your help on this. I've been exploring to see if I can find some of the recordings you've mentioned.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Coralena
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 11:49 AM

Now I am curious about this song. Could you please post it?


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Subject: Chords Add: THE WRAGGLE TAGGLE GYPSIES
From: Gene Graham
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 12:06 PM

Here's one short version.

THE WRAGGLE TAGGLE GYPSIES

Once there [C#m] were three gypsies
Who came [G#7] to my door [C#m]
And [A] called up to my [G#m] lady-o
[E] Quickly [C#m] she, very, [E] very merri-[F#m] ly
Went away [G#m] with the wraggle, taggle gyps-[C#m] ies O!
Last night she slept on a goose featherbed
A home so warm had my lady-o
Now I'm told she is hungry and she's cold
Far away with the wraggle, taggle gypsies O!

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 23-Oct-02.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 03:38 PM

We have quite a few versions of the song (Child #200). Search the database for #200 or gypsy..


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Una Grey
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 03:41 PM

The Waterboys also have a good version on their Room to Roam album


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Susan of DT
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 07:53 PM

If you search for "#200" you will find LOTS of versions of Gypsy Davy. It is a very popular ballad


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Ricky Rackin
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 09:19 PM

Stefan Sobel [yes, the cittern-maker!] sang "Seven Yellow Gypsies"

Seven yellow gypsies stood in a row

And by them came my lady-o

She was the fairest of them all

And she's gone with the seven yellow gypsies-o

More.... if anyone's still pulling on this thread Ricky


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Rosslyn Clayton
Date: 19 Jun 97 - 04:58 AM

I have a cd called The Songs of Scotland from Emporio EMPRCD590. On it is the song Raggle Taggle Gypsies sung by Kathleen MacDonald.

Happy hunting. I would be interested in the words of the song as well.

Rosslyn Clayton R.Clayton@mailbox.uq.edu.au


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Rosslyn Clayton
Date: 19 Jun 97 - 05:16 AM

I have a cd called The Songs of Scotland from Emporio EMPRCD590. On it is the song Raggle Taggle Gypsies sung by Kathleen MacDonald.

Happy hunting. I would be interested in the words of the song as well.

Rosslyn Clayton R.Clayton@mailbox.uq.edu.au


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Bo
Date: 20 Jun 97 - 01:19 PM

Christy Moore has a good version of this song on his album "Prosperous".

bo


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TRAVELLING SALESMAN (Alan Foster)
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 20 Jun 97 - 07:02 PM

G'day,

Here's a version I bet you haven't heard - The Australian version! I've just changed the country and century.

THE TRAVELLING SALESMAN

by Alan Foster, 1989

A travelling salesman came knocking on the door
Of a bored young housewife on the North Shore
And he spoke so sweet and he dressed so neat
That he stole the heart of the lady, oh.

Late that night when the yuppie came home
From his office at Jones & Bagnell's, oh
Of his wife there's no sign but a note on the fridge
And a volume of Funk & Wagnell's, oh.

Well he thought that the note would tell him that
His dinner was waiting in the microwave
But instead it said "I have gone far away
So don't bother waiting up for me, Dave".

So he ran to his Porsche in the triple garage
The BM's not so speedy, oh
And his brand new Merc's just another tax lurk
To hell with the poor and needy, oh.

Oh he drove north and he drove south
Searching every motel, oh
Until he spied his own wedded bride
In the bar of the Railway Hotel, oh.

Oh how could you leave your fine waterbed
Your swimming pool and Jacuzzi, oh
And your upwardly mobile husband dear
And become another salesman's floozie, oh.

What care I for my fine waterbed
It's just sprung a leak on my side, oh
For tonight I'll lie both warm and dry
In arms of the travelling salesman, oh.

The North Shore is an affluent area of Sydney.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: Lyr Add: RAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSY / WRAGGLE-TAGGLE ...
From: Ran Coleman
Date: 22 Jun 97 - 12:20 AM

Here are two slightly different versions. One may be from the database -- I'm not sure where I got it:

THE RAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSY

There were three gypsies came to our door.
They came brave and boldly, O.
One sang high and another sang low,
And the other sang Raggle-Taggle Gypsies, O.

It was upstairs, downstairs the lady went,
Put on her suit of leather, O,
And there was a cry from around the door,
"She's away with the raggle-taggle gypsy, O."

It was late that night when the lord came in,
Inquiring for his lady, O,
And the servant girl she said to the lord,
"She's away with the raggle-taggle gypsy, O."

"Well, saddle for me my milk-white steed.
My big horse is not speedy, O,
And I will ride and seek my bride.
She's away with the raggle-taggle gypsy, O."

Well, he rode east, and he rode west.
He rode north and south also,
Until he came to a wide-open field.
It was there that he spied his lady, O.

"Tell me, how you could leave your goose-feather bed,
Your blankets strewn so comely, O?
How could you leave your newly wedded lord,
All for a raggle-taggle gypsy, O?"

"Well, what care I for my goose-feather bed,
For my blankets strewn so comely, O?
Tonight I lie in a wide-open field
In the arms of the raggle-taggle gypsy, O."

"Tell me, how could you leave your house and your land,
How could you leave your money, O?
How could you leave your only wedded lord,
All for a raggle-taggle gypsy, O?"

"Well, what care I for my house and my land?
And what care I for my money, O?
I'd rather have a kiss from the yellow gypsy's lips.
I'm away with the raggle-taggle gypsy, O!"


THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSY

There were three gypsies a-come to my door,
And downstairs ran this-a lady, O.
One sang high and another sang low
And the other sang Bonny Bonny Biscay, O.

Then she pulled off her silk finished gown,
And put on hose of leather, O.
The ragged, ragged rags about our door,
And she's gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O.

It was late last night when my lord came home,
Inquiring for his a-lady, O.
The servants said on every hand,
"She's gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O."

"O saddle to me my milk-white steed,
And go and fetch me my pony, O,
That I may ride and seek my bride,
Who's gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O."

O he rode high, and he rode low.
He rode through wood and copses too,
Until he came to a wide-open field,
And there he espied his-a lady, O.

"What makes you leave your house and land?
What makes you leave your money, O?
What makes you leave your new-wedded lord,
To follow the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O?"

"What care I for my house and land?
What care I for my money, O?
What care I for my new-wedded lord?
I'm off with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O!"

"Last night you slept on a goose-feather bed,
With the sheet turned down so bravely, O.
Tonight you'll sleep in a cold open field,
Along with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O."

"What care I for a goose-feather bed,
With the sheet turned down so bravely, O?
For tonight I'll sleep in a cold open field,
Along with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O."

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 23-Oct-02.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: LaMarca
Date: 25 Jun 97 - 02:25 PM

Great parody, Alan! Have you seen "The Beatniks and the Hippies" (it's in the DT)? It's a slightly dated up-dating of Wraggle Taggle, I think from Victoria or Vancouver, British Columbia...


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: LaMarca
Date: 25 Jun 97 - 02:31 PM

Forgot to add, Elizabeth Scarborough, the fantasy writer, wrote a fun novel based loosely on Child 200, called "Song of Sorcery". It opens with a minstrel very nearly getting himself in DEEP trouble when he sings the latest gossip ballad about the lord's wife running off with the gypsies, only to find that the lady's sister is in the audience. She is NOT pleased to hear her sister's reputation besmirched - and she's a witch... The book (and its several sequals) are funny and fun to read.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org
Date: 26 Jun 97 - 02:33 PM

Unfortunately, I haven't yet gotten my hands on it, but a minstrel group called Double Indemnity did a beautiful version of this song. If anybody's gone go the PA or NJ Faire in the past couple years, you might have seen them wandering around and heard this. I'm considering writing to the group to ask them to send me a copy of Raggle-Taggle Gypsy.. the first version one hears of a song is usually the one held most dear...


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Subject: Lyr Add: RAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSY
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 12:54 PM

A version from the Irish Descendants:

Ah there were three old gypsies came to our hall door.
They came brave and boldly-o,
And there's one sang high and the other sang low,
And the lady sang the Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o.

It was upstairs and downstairs the lady went,
Put on her suit of leather-o.
It was the cry all around the door,
"She's away with the Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o."

It was late that night when the lord came in,
Inquiring for his lady-o.
The servant girl she replied to the lord,
"She's away with the Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o."

"Oh, saddle for me, me milk white steed.
Me big horse is not speedy-o.
Tonight I'll ride to the wide-open field,
And it's there that I'll spy my Lady-o."

So he rode east and he rode west.
He rode north and south also,
But when he rode to the wide-open field
It was there that he spied his lady-o.

"Oh, why did you leave your house and your land?
Why did you leave your money-o?
Why did you leave your only wedded lord
To be off with the Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o?"

"Yerra, what do I care for me house and me land?
What do I care for money-o??
And what do I care for my only wedded lord??
I'm away with the Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o."

"Last night you slept in a goose-feather bed
With blankets drawn so comely-o.
Tonight you'll lie in a wide-open field
In the arms of a Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o."

"Yerra, what do I care for a goose-feather bed?
What do I care for blankets-o?
And what do I care for me only wedded lord?
I'm away with the Raggle-Taggle Gypsy-o."

So he rode east and she rode west.
He rode high and I rode low.
"I'd rather have a kiss of the yellow Gypsy's lips
Than all of your cash and your money-o."

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 23-Oct-02.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 01:37 PM

Ewan MacColl did a wonderful unaccompanied version on one of the disks of _The English and Scottish Popular Ballads_ (the Child ballads), available from Smithsonian- Folkways in either CDs or tape.
Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: kendall
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 02:05 PM

The Tannehill Weavers did a great job on this.. Gordon Bok used to sing it, and his version went ..one sang high and another sang low, one sang Bonnie Bonnie Biscay oh..


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GeorgeH
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 02:07 PM

Wasn't this track which the (BBC, UK) Radio 2 Folk Awards voted the year's best? Done by Waterson/Carthy . . .

Though for my money their version doesn't come close to Martin Simpson's recent performances of it.

And, as noted, there are MANY variants of it.

G.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: kendall
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 02:09 PM

Gordon Bok used to sing it, and his version went ..one sang high and another sang low, one sang Bonnie Bonnie Biscay oh..


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Elektra
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 03:11 PM

Kiwi:

I'll be seeing Double Indemnity sometime in the next few weeks and I'm planning to pick up a couple of their CD's myself! I've seen them many times -- they are a LOT of fun.

BTW, I'm not sure, but I think you can order some through their website at www.doubleindemnity.com

*elektra*

<a href="HTTP://www.doubleindemnity.com">">Click here</a>


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Gypsy
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 04:25 PM

Oh yeah! Minstrels of Mayhem do a great rendition of this old Child ballad. Check it out at thier website, www.minstrelsofmayhem.com. I think they have midi clips


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Kim C
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 04:50 PM

There's a good recording on A Present From the Gentlemen by John Roberts and Tony Barrand.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Willie-O
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 05:39 PM

Also look for versions of "Black Jack Davey". Arlo Guthrie sings an Americanized version (with a horn section--cool!) which I think was adapted by Woody hisself. Used to hear it on the radio a lot (70's) so it may even have charted! Starts:

It was late last night when the boss came home
Askin about his lady
The only answer that he got:
"She's gone with the Black Jack Davey,
She's gone with Black Jack Davey."

Willie-O


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: rangeroger
Date: 10 Mar 00 - 10:00 PM

Wiilie-O:
Have you heard Dave Alvin's version? Album titled the same;" Black Jack David"
rr


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 12:30 AM

I'm surprised that nobody seems to have mentioned Planxty's recording (on their first album), which I suspect is where the Irish Descendants got theirs -right down to the interjected "Yerra"s!  As for "Seven Yellow Gypsies", Martin Carthy did a rather fine take of that on "Prince Heathen".

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: roopoo
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 01:27 AM

There is also the "Gypsy Rover" which is of the same ilk. It's not one of my favourite versions, though. It's the one where the chorus goes

Ah-de-do, ah-de-do-dah-day, ah-de-do-ah-de-day-dee. He whistled and he sang till the green woods rang, and he won the heart of a lady.

It is not one of my favourites, and I think that chorus has a lot to do with why! Somewhere I have a few sheets of "Raggle Taggle Gypsy" song lyrics, but I can't find them. (Typical). There would pribably be nothing new on. I think it even has the hippies and beatniks version too!

mouldy


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 09:18 PM

and then there's GYPSIES, TRAMPS AND THIEVES by Chair.

But seriously the ve


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Subject: Lyr Add: CLAYTON BOONE (from Harry Jackson)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 10:54 PM

"7 Yellow Gypsies" leads off Nic Jones recent CD.

Also---HARRY JACKSON on his 2-LP set of cowboy songs on Folkways, HARRY JACKSON---THE COWBOY (his songs and brag talk), did a classic western version of this song----Here it is.

"CLAYTON BOONE".

'Twas way out in New Mexico along the Spanish line
I was workin' for old Clayton Boone --a man well past his prime.

He rides in and asks of me, "What's happened to my lady?"
I says to him, "She's quit your range and run with the handsome Davey."

"Go saddle for my proud cut dun with the coal black mane and tail
Point out to me their fresh laid tracks and after them I'll trail."

I'll bridle on my leather chaps--I'll tie my pistol o'er,
I'll step aboard that black striped dun and ride this whole world over."

I rode upon a saddle fine --a saddle made o0f silver,
My bridle rein of beaten gold--not of your common silver.

I rode until the midnight sun -- 'til I saw their campfire burnin'
And I heard the sweetest mandolin and the voice of the young Dave singing.

"Come home with me to your own sweet bed -- the sheets turned down so gayly,
Do not forget my silver and gold and your darling baby."

"Well, I'll not come home to my own sweet bed--the sheets turned down so gayly,
And I'll forget your silver and gold and all for the love of Davy. "Last night I slept with a mean old man in golden rooms so stately,
Tonight I'll sleep on the hard cold ground by the warm side of my Davey,
And I'll ride along with Dave."

_______________________________________________________ Ed Tricket also has this on a great Folk Legacy album. Bob Bovee did a fine version too.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: raredance
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 12:33 AM

A nice version of "Gypsy Davy" can be found on a 1980 LP by Roxanne and Dan Keding called "From Far and Near"

Billy Edd Wheeler added a a chorus to his version called "Black Jack Davy" on the album "Billy Edd: USA"

rich r


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 01:58 AM

Mark Graham did a version that I know as "Honest Al," though it may have another name. "Would you forsake your house and home, your bridge club and your baby/To ride off in a microbus and risk a case of scabies?" I don't remember all the words or I'd post them. Maybe after I take my ginkgo I'll give it a try. It's not in the DT, though several of his songs are.

And I have one, too, based on the "Black Jack Davy" version of the story. It's called BLACK JACK DAVY (IN ATLANTIC CITY). I hope the traditionalists will forgive me.

Aloha
Mark


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Art Thieme
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 11:03 AM

Mark,

That's a great one.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: raredance
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 11:43 AM

Mark,

Love your lyrics. Hope you can pull the Graham one out of your mind's recesses as it sounds equally delightful.

rich r


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Subject: Lyr Add: HONEST AL(?) (Mark Graham?)
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 06:00 PM

Art, I am deeply honored.
Rich, here is what my depleted memory banks can reconstruct of Mark's song. After reading the words to "Clayton Boone," posted by Art above, I suspect Mark based it on that song. Tune will tell. (Sorry, Art, couldn't resist.) I wish I had an easy way of posting tunes.

HONEST AL (May not be the real title)
by Mark Graham (May not be a real person)

I was working down in Fresno, to the end of my endurance
Working for old Honest Al, who sold low-cost insurance

He'd call his wife each day at three, inquiring "What's for dinner?"
With the Cuisinart and the microwave, it always was a winner

But then one day he called his wife, and man, was it a bummer
She said she'd gone and left him for a hippie guitar strummer

"I've thrown away my high-heeled shoes, I will no longer need 'em
And bought a pair of Birkenstocks; I've never known such freedom

So goodbye to suburbia and the only life I've known
I've gone away forever - leave your message at the tone"

So Al got in his XKE, 'cause the Lincoln wouldn't handle
And went to retrieve his wifey dear and thus avoid a scandal

He drove and he drove down the interstate till he found them by the sea-O
They were chanting out their mantra, No Myo Harenge Kyo

"How could you leave your house and lawn, your bridge club and your baby
To run off in a microbus and risk a case of scabies?

I'll give to you a Betamax if you'll come home with me-O"
She shook her head and passed the pipe, and said, "Let's be a trio"

So Al put on a wide-brimmed hat, a poncho and some sandals
The three now live in Santa Cruz, quite happy making candles


Now there's a master. As far as I know, Mark and Susan are still in Seattle, but it's been a long time since I've seen them.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 06:04 PM

P.S., Dick or Susan, I hope this can be added to Mark's oeuvre in the DT. Or else just put it with the rest of his songs.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Mar 00 - 11:17 AM

'betamax', ooooo ephemeral technology


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Tommy Mooney
Date: 13 Mar 00 - 03:10 PM

There is a great version on their early recordings by a group of "Celtic Rockers" called, guess? "The Raggle Taggle Gypsies" an up-tempo version using the Planxty(Christy Moore) lyrics. This Irish band play lots of festivals around europe, especially in Scandanavia, where they are very highly regarded.They line-up Derek Murtagh, from Trim, Co.Meath on keyboard; a dubliner Brendan who leads vocal and plays bodhran and rythym guitar; another dubliner Paul plays guitar/banjo and one of several fiddlers , Kevin or Hugh two virtuosi who can really bow it. Check them out


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Bearheart
Date: 25 Jul 00 - 11:37 PM

Found lots of references on this thread to versions of the Raggle-Taggle Gypseys, but none are the version I'm seeking--- done years ago by Delores Keane and one of the finest I've heard. If anyone out there knows of it I'm still looking for those lyrics.

Bearheart


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Trevor
Date: 31 Jul 00 - 03:10 PM

There's a cracking version of this on the 'Waterson & Carthy' album


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 31 Jul 00 - 03:41 PM

Christy Moore also sang it with Planxty - I wonder if this might be the one Barry was tryingto remember? I think they recorded it - maybe on "The Well Below the Valley."


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: oggie
Date: 31 Jul 00 - 04:12 PM

Planxty recorded it on 'Planxty' which was their first album and it segues into 'Give Me your Hand' (This was the first time I ever heard Irish music and I've been hooked ever since). It's the same version' but diferent production, to the one on Christy Moore's 'Prosperous'. The Planxty album was produced by Phil Coulter who in those days was part of Coulter/Quinn productions who produced endless chart teen bands (I think the Bay City Rollers were one of theirs!)

All the best

Steve

PS there was also a Fred Wedlock spoof version the only line I can remember is 'Bring to me the MGB, the Rolls is ne'er so speedy-o.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BLACKJACK DAVY
From: GUEST,David E. Siegel (Siegel@acm.org)
Date: 31 Jul 00 - 04:20 PM

Richard Dyer-Bennett did a version of this, on his CD Entitled "The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies". This is a collection of traditional songs from various periods, with printed lyrics in the liner notes. Don't have the CD to hand, but I bought it only 3 or 4 years ago in a mainstream book/record store, so it can't be long out of print. He also did a version of BLACKJACK DAVY on a much older record which I used to have in vinyl. If memory serves that version went:

Blackjack Davy came a riding through the trees.
He sang so loud and clearly.
He made the green woods around him ring,
And he charmed the heart of a lady. (2x)

Will you go with me, my pretty little miss?
Will you go with me, my honey?
She made him an answer with a hug and a kiss:
"I'll be sixteen next Sunday." (2x)

She took off her high-heeled shoes
All made of Spanish leather.
She put on her low-heeled shoes
And they rode off together. (2x)

The landlord he came home at night
Inquiring for his lady.
The chambermaid made this reply:
"She's gone with the Blackjack Davy." (2x)

"Go bridle and saddle my little yellow mare.
The grey one's not so speedy.
I rode all day and I'll ride all night
So I'll overtake my lady." (2x)

He rode till he came to the dark blue sea.
It looked so dark and dreary.
And there he spied his own dear bride
By the side of the Blackjack Davy. (2x)

"Will you forsake your house and land?
Will you forsake your baby?
Will you forsake your own wedded lord
To go with the black-jack Davy?" (2x)

She took off her white glove
All made of Spanish leather.
She waved farewell with her lily-white hand.
She said, "Farewell forever." (2x)

-----

I also recall some quotes/references to one of the versions given earlier in this thread in D. L. Sayers' novel _Busman's Honeymoon_ when it appears that the main characters may be locked out on their wedding night.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 23-Oct-02.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Alice
Date: 10 Aug 01 - 11:13 PM

Here is my recording of Raggle Taggle Gypsy. I like the way Tom's fiddle sounds like it is playing the role of the gypsy. I also added a couple of verses of my own at the end:

So let this be a lesson true,
You gentlemen with money-o
Not all your gold or silv'ry chains
Can bind the heart of a lady-o.

For a lady loves with a tender heart
And tender kisses win her, oh,
Not all your servants or castles high,
Can keep the heart of a lady-o.

recording - Raggle Taggle Gypsy, Alice Flynn and Tom Robison


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: masato sakurai
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 12:02 AM

I like Steeleye Span's "Black Jack Davy" rather than Alfred Deller's "Wraggle Taggle Gypsies." Anyway, Bronson recorded 127 variants (and a few more in vol. 4)of this very familar ballad (or, group of ballads, we should say) in The Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads. Most of them are given words separately along with the music. How varied they are!


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: masato sakurai
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 01:33 AM

P.S. Here's a list of title-name variants: The Gypsy Davy; Black Cat Davy; Black Jack David; Black Jack Davie/y; Black-Eyed Davy; Balckjack Davy; the Brown-Eyed Gipses; Clayton Boone; Dark-Eyed Gypsy; The Egyptian Davie; Gipsies-O; Gipsum Davy; Gipsy Davie; The Gipsy Laddie; Gyp's Come Tripping O'er the Plain; Gyps of David; The Gyps of Davy; Gypsey Davey; Gypsum Davey; Gypsum Davy; The Gypsy Countess; The Gypsy Daisy; The Gypsy Laddie; The Gypsy Laddies; Gypsy Laddio; Gypsy Lover; Gypsy Rover; Gypsy-O; The 'Gyptian Laddie; Harrison Brady; Harvey Walker; Johnie Faa; Johnny Faa; Johnny Faa, the Gypsy Laddie; Johnny Faw; Johnny the Seer; The Lady and the Gypsy; A Neat Young Lady; The Radical Gypsy David; Raggle Taggle Gypsies, O!; The Raggle-Taggle Gypsies; Seven Gypsies; Seven Gypsies in a Row; Whistling Gypsy; The Wraggle Taggle Cool Cats - Parody; The Wraggle Taggle Gipsies; The Wraggle Taggle Gipsies-O!; The Wraggle Taggle Gypsies; The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies-O!; The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies; The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies, O/Oh!; The Yellow Castle Lady (from Brunnings' Folk Song Index). Let me add some others from Bronson: Lady Cassilles Lilt; The Davy; The Egytian Davy O; It Was Late in the Night When Johnny Came Home; How Old Are You, My Pretty Little Miss; The Lady's Disgrace; The Three Gipsies; Three Gipsies Came to the Door; There Were Seven Gypsies; The Dark-Clothed Gypsy; Draggletail Gipsies; Gipsies of Agee (Egypt) Oh!; The Ragtail Gipsies, Oh!; The Gipsies Came to Lord M--'s Gate; Gipsy Draly; David. Can anyone add more?


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: pavane
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 04:27 AM

Bodley has Gypsy Loddy

A different song, The Gypsies, is about stealing in infant


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: ard mhacha
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 08:11 AM

Malcom Douglas, Christy Moores singing of The Raggle Taggle Gypsy is still the best I have heard, he fairly rattles this out. I have it on a 1973 Polydor LP. On the Disc notes it states that the song was learned from the late John Reilly a travelling man from County Roscommon. The Record was Planxty and was produced by Phil Coulter. Still can be had on CD, great stuff. Slan Ard Mhacha.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Peg
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 02:10 PM

A band from Northampton, MA called Cordelia's Dad did a version of Seven Yellow Gypsies on on of their early albums...

"There were seven yellow gypsies all in a row
None of them lame or lazy-o
And they sang so sweet and they sang so complete
that they stole the heart of a lady-o"


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Mudlark
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 03:21 PM

And...in case you want some simple chords with the words...this great song is in Rise Up Singing, page 16 in my copy...with just 3 chords that work pretty well...Am, Em and D.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 11 Aug 01 - 07:50 PM

I know the Planxty record well, and have had it since it first came out; I took up the bouzouki pretty much on the strength of it.  John Reilly's set of the song was issued on The Bonny Green Tree (Topic 12T359, 1978) but I don't know if it's been reissued since.

I sometimes wonder whether it's such a good idea to resurrect old, long threads like this one; people are so eager to contribute that they tend to repeat information already given.  The Reilly text, for example, has been posted twice in this discussion (on neither occasion was he mentioned), though both times perhaps a little mis-remembered.  Here is a consolidated list of links to some relevant meterial here and elsewhere.  Whether anybody will look at them before adding duplicate material here or in new threads, I doubt; at least the resource will be available in the future.

In the DT:

THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSIES  With tune; no source specified.

THE GYPSY LADDIE  Text and tune from a book.

GYPSY LADDIES  From a recording by Cila Fisher and Artie Treizise; no tune given or traditional source named.

GYPSIE LADDIE  From the singing of Jean Ritchie; no tune.

THE GYPSY LADDIE (4)  Properly called Gypsy Davy.  Set noted by Cecil Sharp from Mrs. Jane Gentry at Hot Springs, N.C.; text collated with other versions.

SEVEN GYPSIES ON YON HILL  With tune; from the Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs, ed. Edith Fowke.  No traditional source named.

GYPSY DAVEY  American text; no tune, no source named.

GYPSY ROVER  Leo Maguire's modern song based on the story, often imagined to be traditional.  Learnt at one remove from a Clancy Brothers record.  With tune.

BLACK JACK DAVEY  Learnt from the Putnam County String Band, with tune.

BLACK JACK DAVID  Mike Heron's modern song based on the story.  No tune.

BLACKJACK DAVEY (2)  American set with tune, from Almeda Riddle.

HARRISON BRADY  Noted by Samuel Bayard, from Lily Bell Dietrick at Morgantown WVa, 1944; with tune.

THE LADY AND THE GYPSY  From The Ballad Book of John Jacob Niles, with tune.  Traditional source not named.

WHEN CARNAL FIRST CAME TO ARKANSAS  Noted from Mrs. Zona Blak, Arkansas, 1942.  No tune.

BLACK JACK DAVY (IN ATLANTIC CITY)  Parody by Mark Cohen.

THE HIPPIES AND THE BEATNIKS  Parody by Miles Wooten.

In the Forum:

Raggle-Taggle Gypsy: Authored by?  Brief discussion with one substantive comment, from Bruce Olson.

RE: Raggle Taggle Gypsie 'O  Enquiry from someone who couldn't find the song; hardly surprising in view of the way he spelled it.  Contains several links.

Nic Jones- Seven Yellow Gypsies  Texts of sets recorded by Nic Jones and Cordelia's Dad.  In neither case is a traditional source named.

Gypsy Rover a real folk song   -(To which the answer, though not given in so many words, would be "no".)  Includes background from Bruce Olson, some links, and Alan Foster's parody The Travelling Salesman.

Whistling Gypsy - prejudice?  Lengthy discussion .  Includes lyric of Leo Maguire's modern re-write, The Whistling Gypsy (Gypsy Rover), and an English translation of the unrelated An Spailpín Fánach; also a translation into Gaelic of Maguire's lyric (confusingly, also titled An Spailpín Fánach) made by Proinsias Ó Maonaigh.

Scottish folk  Short discussion in which Child's #200 (The Gypsy Laddie) and #280 (The Beggar Laddie) become confused.

At the  Max Hunter Folk Song Collection:

The Gypsy Davy  As sung by Mrs. George Ripley in Milford, Missouri on November 21, 1959

Black Jack Davey  As sung by Mrs. Lula Davis, Fayettville, Arkansas on June 14, 1958

Black Jack Davey  As sung by Mr. Wise Jones, Fayettville, Arkansas on June 21, 1958

Black Jack Davy  As sung by Sara Jo Bell, Harrison, Arkansas on August 25, 1969

At Lesley Nelson's  Folk Music  site:

The Gypsy Laddie  Jean Ritchie's set, with tune.

The Wraggle, Taggle Gypsies, O!  Set with tune from Folk-Songs, Chanteys and Singing Games ( Charles H. Farnsworth and Cecil J. Sharp, 1909) No traditional source named.

Johnny Faa  Set with tune from The Saltire Scottish Song Book (Cedric Thorpe Davie and George C. McVicar, 1991; no traditional source named).

There is an entry at the  Traditional Ballad Index:

Gypsy Laddie, The [Child 200]

There are a number of broadside editions at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads,  including:

Gypsy Laddie  Printed between 1821 and 1838 by W. Stephenson, at the Cheap Song Emporium, No. 8, Bridge street, Gateshead.  (With The Female Smuggler).

Gypsy loddy  Printed between 1819 and 1844 by J. Pitts, Printer, Wholesale Toy and Marble Warehouse, 6, Great St. Andrew Street,Seven Dials.  (With The Oxford scholar).

The gipsy laddie  Printed between 1847 and 1852 by John Ross, Arcade, Newcastle.  (With My Gentle Mother Dear, by Samuel Lover).

The gipsy laddie, O  Printed between 1863 and 1885 by H.P. Such, Machine Printer & Publisher, 177, Union- street, Borough, S.E.

The gipsy laddy  Printed by W. Forth of Bridlington.  (With The Arab Steed and The Deep Blue Sea).

Gipsie laddie  Printed by A.C. Brander of Elgin.  (With The Female Rambling Sailor).

A much [a]dmired [s]ong called the Dark-eyed gipsy O  Printed c.1867 by W. Birmingham of Dublin.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: pavane
Date: 12 Aug 01 - 05:59 AM

Malcolm, I can't get that last link to open (in large format) although I can get the small version. Is it just a problem at my end?

I always thought that Gypsy/Black Jack Davey and Wraggle Taggle/Seven Yellow Gypsies were two different, though related, songs. The first is sung more from the gypsy's point of view, and he doesn't get hanged. There is obviously a lot of exchange between the songs, though.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: ard mhacha
Date: 12 Aug 01 - 07:29 AM

To tell you the truth Malcolm I wouldn`t break my ass to hear the song, but,Planxty and Christy Moore gave it a blood transfusion.. Slan Ard Mhacha.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Garry Gillard
Date: 13 Aug 01 - 04:17 AM

Seven Yellow Gypsies is on the Mike Waterson LP and also on the Pence and Spicy Ale CD, and has also been re-released on the Mike Waterson CD. A different version of Seven Yellow Gypsies is on Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick's Prince Heathen, and also on Martin Carthy: A Collection (1999).

Garry Gillard


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Garry Gillard
Date: 13 Aug 01 - 04:20 AM

Raggle Taggle Gipsies is on The Waterson Carthy Band's Broken Ground.

Garry Gillard


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 13 Aug 01 - 06:59 AM

Malcolm, that's an incredible piece of research! I understand your point about old threads, but there's another side to it. For some time now (maybe since the beginning of the Mudcat, for all I know), there have been frequent attempts to get people to check for old threads before starting new ones. In this case Alice did just that, and I appreciated the refresher. Yes, there might be some duplication, but on balance I'd prefer that to a half-dozen disparate threads on the same topic. Unless, of course, you're talking about Seagull guitars....! (Sorry, that was an inside joke at 'Spaw's expense. But I'm sure he can afford it.)

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,harryrages@onetel.net.uk
Date: 13 Aug 01 - 08:46 PM

Best version of this sort was Davy Graham's Seven Gypsies which he recorded on 'Folk, Blues & Beyond' around 1967 ish. I still have the original LP. Can send lyrics if you want. Gerald.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Cory Ducey
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 08:43 AM

Being someone that grew up with Folk Music, and being from Newfoundland, Canada where Irish runs in our blood, there is a folk band that sings Folk songs called the Irish Descendants.

They are awesome!!


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: NoMattch
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:56 AM

A bad recording but a good version of the song can be found on:

www.greenhotclover.com

I've seen this band do it on occasion when I was in the UK. They're a bunch of Salford college grads from the Manchester area. Definitely worth a listen.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Desdemona
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 06:08 PM

The version on Waterson-Carthy's "Broken Ground" is one of the most artfully arranged I've ever heard; the way it builds gradually is just beautiful.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: WyoWoman
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 12:11 AM

I agree. I have the Waterson-Carthy version and love it. It's such a universal theme -- woman with some fire in her heart married to an emotionally constipated man with ice-water in his veins, throwing all her material wealth away for the sake of true passion, wrapped in a grungy package. The thing I like about the Waterson Carthy version is, I believe, that she doesn't get punished for her choice in the end. She's dirt poor, but doesn't end up drowned or humiliated or burned at the stake. (Of course, I haven't been able to find my CD in over a year, so I could be dead wrong about this and just rewrote the ending inside my own mind to please myself. Self-delusion has its advantages.)

ww


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Desdemona
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 12:06 PM

No, she ends by saying she doesn't care about the nice feather bed et al., she'd rather sleep in the cold open field with the gypsies; hopefully she doesn't end up meeting the fate so many "naughty" wives come to in folk songs!


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: WyoWoman
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:37 PM

Are there ANY folk songs in which the woman hooks up with a NICE or even desireable rich man?

ARE there any nice, desireable rich men? If so, please call 877.555.1212... )
WW


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,riverdan
Date: 02 Mar 02 - 11:08 PM

A year or so ago The Thistle & Shamrock played a version of this song where the king captured the gypsey and killed him and himself by falling out of the tower. The lord was aided by one of his men who blew the hunting horn to call help. Does anyone know who recorded this version and where I can find lyrics?


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Maryrrf
Date: 03 Mar 02 - 09:19 AM

I do the "Wraggle Taggle Gypsies" on my CD "Two Strings on Every Bow" which can be had at CD Baby. It's a collections of ballads with guitar accompaniement. WyoWoman - one song that comes to mind about a woman taking up with a nice rich guy is "Leezie Lindsay". As soon as she realizes he's "Laird Ronald McDonald, a chieftain o' high degeee" - yes, that's really his name but when I sing it in public I change it to "the young laird McDonald" so the audience won't imagine a clown instead of a handsome highlander - she "kilts up her gown of green satin" and runs away with him to the highlands.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 03 Mar 02 - 06:13 PM

Yes, but how do you work out he's nice? She realises he's rich and powerful and decides to throw in her lot with him. (We were singing the song tonight and had to explain it to someone who thought it was an extremely abrupt change of heart on the girl's part - which it is, in my opinion!)


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: bernil
Date: 03 Mar 02 - 06:20 PM

I've downloaded and listened a lot to the version with Tears for Bears , on MP3.com. I think it's great!

Berit


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Maryrrf
Date: 03 Mar 02 - 09:03 PM

Well how do you know if any of them are nice or not until it's too late and you find out the hard way??? At least that's been my experience. For a while they're on their best behavior - then little by little.... I guess I just always imagined Ronald McDonald, um I mean "the young laird McDonald" as being rich AND nice, for some reason. Probably just projecting wishful thinking onto the song. I hope it worked out for young Leezie Lindsay!


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Apr 02 - 01:22 PM

I've only heard the version by the Bothy Band, from their first album, but I love it.

It is on CD and easily available.

The singer's phrasing is amazing.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Nerd
Date: 09 Apr 02 - 05:20 PM

The Shaman version of this song is on a tape called The Green Man. They're not that hard to find; just go here:

http://www.solstar.org/shaman.htm

I haven't heard this album, but the band members are old friends of mine from years back, which is why I'm butting in...


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: IanC
Date: 10 Apr 02 - 05:08 AM

WW

Two songs you might like are The Gypsy Rover - as far as i know a US version of Raggle-Taggle Gypsies, where the guy turns out to be rich. There's also The Little Gypsy Girl which tells the tale from the other way round. The Mudcat version's a bit twee ... in most of the broadside versions, she finds him VERY nice.

Cheers
Ian


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 10 Apr 02 - 05:21 AM

Gypsy Rover is a modern song by Leo Maguire, an Irish broadcaster; discussed at some length in several of the threads linked to in my earlier post. I don't recall a recording of Raggle Taggle Gypsies on the first Bothy Band album (or any other, indeed); perhaps Guest was thinking of Planxty's arrangement of John Reilly's traditional set. So far as I can remember, the phrasing was based fairly closely on his.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Nerd
Date: 10 Apr 02 - 02:08 PM

I think malcolm is right, and Planxty is the band our guest was thinking of. By mentioning Sweeney's Men AND the Bothy Band, he covered most of Planxty's members, anyway :-) Many other versions were based on this one, including the Irish Descendants' and the Waterboys'. The Planxty version was closely based on the Christy Moore one mentioned by Bo; it was at the recording sessions for Prosperous that Planxty was born. And I believe Malcolm has it right that Christy took it from John Reilly's repertoire, as he did several great ballads.

My favorite revival version of this song is "Gypsy Laddie" by the Tannahill Weavers, from their eponymous third LP. Great Stuff!


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Zorikh
Date: 15 Sep 02 - 03:39 PM

I've spent most of the day researching this song, it's origins, variants etc. I first heard the Dave Alvin version ("Blakjack David") and thought I might sing it at a SCA event because it sounded sort of petiod-ish and has a romantic theme. I like how his version makes it uncertain whether David and the lady will make love together on the "cold cold ground" or will join in a mutual suicide pact or a killed by her husband. This song is a facinating textbook example of how a universal theme can be turned into a song with local pesons of fact, fiction, history, and legend, and then changes as it is passed down from hand to hand, culture to culture.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,johnnie
Date: 09 Oct 02 - 11:29 PM

the waterboys - room to roam cd - best one there is


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Jim Clark..London..England
Date: 10 Oct 02 - 08:38 PM

I have videoed several musicians playing this superb song..you camn hear one in the folk sounds section of my acoustic musicians and poets sound archive MSN website

acoustic musicians and poets sound archive


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: old moose
Date: 11 Oct 02 - 12:34 AM

Back in fifty seven (middle of last century)alongside my research on "Edward, My Son Edward" and "Lord Randall, MY Son" I did a search in the publications on "The Raggle Taggle Gypsies" and had about two hundred and fifty citations; Lord Randal and Edward had a great many more. Some of the citations dated to the fourteen hundreds. The conclusion reached by my professor and myself was to the effect that "The Gypsies" as we called it was an early retelling of the Orfeus myth in a form that could be sung and understood by the audiences of the times. No way of knowing, of course, how many permutations it had gone through, nor has it stopped changing as time goes. I quit working on it because of time considerations;
also it seemed a daunting project for a quarters terminal. It would certainly be worse now. Good for a master's thesis at least. I had no desire to go to graduate school then and now in my seventies--naah. Run for it somebody.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: MikeOQuinn
Date: 11 Oct 02 - 05:31 AM

I have a recording of this song on Carlos Núñez's album "Os Amores Libres." I had heard of Núñez prior to this album as a vocalist, but I had never known that he played the pipes as well, which he does with remarkable skill. (The version of "The Raggle-Taggle Gipsy" on this album, for example, is followed by an absolutely smoking rendition of "Itchy Fingers." The two tunes work great together!)

I also like the Gaita (galician bagpipes) that Núñez plays off and on throughout this album. It's different, but very worthwhile.

-J


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Nerd
Date: 11 Oct 02 - 01:09 PM

Funny this thread is back up. I'm teaching a class on Folklore and just this week I used Planxty, the Waterboys, and a Danish band called Moving Cloud (Irish music from Denmark!) all performing essentially the Prosperous/Christy Moore/John Reilly version of "Raggle-Taggle Gypsies" to show the ways a single version or arrangement of a traditional song can "make the rounds" becoming a standard of the folk revival scene. I also used Thin Lizzy and Metallica (!) doing "Whiskey in the Jar."


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: belfast
Date: 12 Oct 02 - 08:24 AM

Talk about the meaning and origins of the song prompts me to add this.Here's a bit from a play "Paddy on the Road" about Christy Moore. Christy has been talking about Ewan MacColl. His companion PJ agrees but…


"PJ: MacColl was a great man certainly.   But some of his acolytes were an awful pain in the arse. I was standing at the bar one night and I'm listening to Christy singing The Raggle Taggle Gypsies and this fella turns to me and says "That's a terribly interesting ballad. There are versions of it all over Europe. But, as Ewan says, you can never really appreciate such a ballad unless you subject it to a Marxist analysis. This song, you see, is a paradigm of the class struggle. The lady in the ballad has abandoned the ruling class and, in the most profound way possible, has displayed her solidarity with one of the oppressed sectors of society. It foretells, in a sense, the Socialist Revolution and the inevitable victory of the proletariat."   And he drones on like this for about twenty minutes. I take a slug of me pint and says, "Is that a fact now? And here's me thinking it was about some hussy runnin' off with a pack of gippoes"

Oh, I know. I know!   We don't use language like that any more. We don't talk about gippoes and tinkers; we talk about travellers. But there's some people who will be very bloody careful to use the word "travellers" and still treat the people behind the word like shite."


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Arne Langsetmo
Date: 12 Oct 02 - 01:16 PM

My favourite version is the House Band's, on their
CD "October Song" (Green Linnet, GLCD 1190).
Their song title is "Seven Yellow Gypsies",
but it's the same.

A wicked haunting accompaniment, which should
give an idea why many people thought the
fiddle the Devil's instrument. . .

Other CD tracks good too, including the title
song.

Cheers,

                            -- Arne Langsetmo


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 07:33 PM

There are two popular written sources likely responsible for some of the dispersion of the Raggle-Taggle version among 20th century revival singers, neither of which are mentioned in this discussion: Cecil Sharp's One Hundred English Folk Songs, a likely source for many folkies on the east side of the pond, and on the west, virtually the same version is in the Fireside Book of American Folk Songs.

I'd like to know where the "ah-dee-doo" chorus comes from. I remember it from the Kingston Trio, but who was singing it before that, anyone in the American stringband tradition? (This is where I want a copy of Bronson...)

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 07:52 PM

Sharp's book was actually published in America, though a similar edition appeared (under a different title) a little later in the UK. For at least some of the answers to the ah-de-doo question, see the second part of the discussion Gypsy Rover a real folk song.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 19 Mar 03 - 01:37 AM

Thanks for pointing me to the right thread, Malcolm.

~ Becky


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: open mike
Date: 19 Mar 03 - 02:34 AM

we used to sing this in girl scouts..
probably what prompted me to run away
from suburbia and live in a tipi on a
commune! i have to check out the thread
on The Beatniks and the Hippies...
I represent that!!


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: robinia
Date: 20 Mar 03 - 01:32 AM

I like the "realistic" note on which an Appalachian version of the song (as sung by Jean Ritchie) ends: "Oh soon this lady changed her mind/ her clothes grew old and faded/ Her hose and shoes came off her feet/ and left them bare and naked.
Just what befell this lady now/ I think it worth relating/ Her gypsy found another lass/ and left her heart a-breaking."


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 21 Mar 03 - 01:21 AM

Hmm. Sounds like a 20th century addition to me! (Good though.)

~ Becky


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: IanC
Date: 21 Mar 03 - 04:39 AM

Well, actually, some of the earlier English versions have similar realism ... "The gold ring on her finger's gone, and the gold plate on her bosom" for example.

:-)


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,DeadMan
Date: 09 Mar 04 - 08:05 PM

Hi!
I have the song on my computer, so if you know of a possible way to copy it you're welcome to do so.

DeadMan


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Leadfingers
Date: 09 Mar 04 - 08:26 PM

An old mate ( Louis Robinson by name) was in a 'Folk Group' which did gigs in a lot of NON Folk venues. They used to get a lot of requests for various versions of this song, and rather than learn them all or
tell the customer they didnt know the song, Louis wrote a song that would fit , Whichever was requested. The song he wrote is called :-
'The Raggle Taggle Black Jack Gypsy Davey Came Whistling Over The Hill With Six of His Mates' - IF any one wants this posted , Just ASK.


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Subject: RE: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: hobbitwoman
Date: 09 Mar 04 - 09:14 PM

There's a recording of The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy on Further Down the Old Plank Road, performed by The Chieftans with Nickel Creek. Or Nickel Creek with The Chieftans. Not sure which. :o)


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,stace
Date: 12 Jun 04 - 11:01 AM

do any of you know of the irish band the raggle taggle gypsies and where i can get info on them??


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Sep 04 - 12:16 AM

If you are asking about the Chieftans irish band the album is called "Further Down the Old Plank Road", they are a band playing traditional irish music, this is a second album from concert session pairing this tradional irish band with well known musicians mostly troubadors of country music. The first alblum is called of course "The Old Plank Road" . "Further.." is available from the Victor record label #82876-52897-2, I got mine from towerrecords.com. I also have a recording of the song from German countertenor Andeas Scholl the album is "Wayfaring Stranger-Folksongs". the concept of this recording is to take the old European songs back from America and reinterpret them by a modern European singer. The Songcather second soundtrack albun (not songs from the movie, but old folksong that "inspired" the movie has a great version of "Black Jack Davey"


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Leadfingers
Date: 11 Sep 04 - 05:59 AM

I still like the Louis Robinson rewrite 'The Raggle Taggle Black Jack Gypsy Davy came Whistling Over the Hill With Six Of His Mates' - It was written so that whichever 'Gypsy' song was requested , the song fitted .


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Leadfingers
Date: 11 Sep 04 - 06:14 AM

Incidentally , Do I score any points for the hundredth post to a thread ?


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Subject: hobnail boots
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Oct 04 - 11:03 AM

can anyone enlighten me? My grandmother used to sing a song to me as a child, but the only bit I can remember is the last line, which I think gets repeated several times throughout the song, and it is "the hobnail boots that father wore"
I would love to be reminded of the words to this song - if anyone knows what it is.
Thanks


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 04 Oct 04 - 12:54 AM

So have you got "The Raggle Taggle Black Jack Gypsy Davy came Whistling Over the Hill With Six Of His Mates' Words? and which tune? :-)

I'm offically asking LeadFingers... :-)


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 04 Oct 04 - 01:01 AM

BTW, on the Penny Black Music Page, there is a Google Ad

"Large selection for sale from cheap and cheerful to Superb"

Is this for the Band or the Stamp?

Maybe the the Band's new slogan... or a new CD title ?

(Do I get a freebie for suggesting the title if you use it?)

:P

Robin


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Subject: Another great version of Gypsy Davy
From: unvarnished
Date: 12 Jan 07 - 12:07 PM

Thanks to Malcolm Douglas for his compendium of postings on this subject. I couldn't find any reference to the version done by Tim Eriksen of Cordelia's Dad on their CD "Comet" (1995). He does a wonderful job of singing and playing, just him, his authentic sounding singing, and a nice acoustic guitar acommpaniment. The notes say he got 6 of the verses from a 1941 recording of Lena Bourne "Grammy" Fish of East Jaffrey, New Hampshire. He describes the song as being "about a woman of great imagination and wit, and her husband who has neither." The recording has 15 verses in all, some of them similar to the Richard Dyer-Bennet version of Raggle-Taggle Gypsies. The tune is a little different from, but related to the "Gypsy Rover" tune. I transcribed this from listening to the CD:

Gypsy Davy
(as performed by Cordelia's Dad)

The gypsy king came over the hill
Defying storm and danger
It seemed to be my lot to fall
In love with the dark-eyed stranger.

I gave to him of the good wheat bread
And he gave to me the ginger
I gave to him a better thing,
All the gold from off my fingers.

And he has asked me to be his wife
To be his honoured lady
He's asked me to leave my home and kin
And follow the Gypsy Davy.

Oh they tell me to marry beneath my rank
Is nothing short of danger
But title and gold cannot compare
With my love for the dark-eyed stranger.

So she's taken off her high heeled shoes
All made of Spanish leather
She's gone down in her loyal shoes
And they rode off together.

Oh they rode high and they rode low
They rode so late and early
They rode til they come to the dark blue sea
And oh but she was weary.

Last night I slept in a down feather bed
An honoured and titled lady
But tonight I'll sleep in the green, green field
In the arms of my Gypsy Davy.

And when the lord come home in the night
Inquiring for his lady
The servants made him this reply:
She's gone with the Gypsy Davy.

Go saddle to me my little yellow mare
The gray one's not so speedy
I rode all day and I rode all night
So I'll overtake my lady

Oh he rode to the dark blue sea
It looked so dark and dreary
There he spied his own dear bride
By the side of the Gypsy Davy.

Oh will you come home my dear, my love?
Will you come home my darling?
I'll keep you safe in a close, close room
Where no man will ever come near you.

No I won't come home my dear, my love
I'll not come home my darling
If I brew good beer, I'll drink the same
And you'll no more come near me.

So she's taken off her long blue gloves
All made of Spanish leather
She waved farewell with a little white hand
She waver farewell forever.

Saying, I do not envy any honoured queen
Or any titled lady
I'd rather be a gypsy queen,
The bride of my black-eyed Davy.

Last night I slept in a down feather bed
An honoured and titled lady
But tonight I'll sleep in the green, green field
In the arms of my Gypsy Davy.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Chris Smith
Date: 12 Jan 07 - 02:36 PM

Looking back in this thread, I find a reference to Martin Simpson's c2000 performances of a version of this song. I heard him do it live but have not been able to locate his CD version (if one exists). Can anyone tell me?

Many thanks for any info.

cjs

chris@coyotebanjo.com


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Apr 08 - 08:41 AM

Has any one heard of an irish Trad band called "The Raggle Taggle Gypsies", if so I would be very grateful for a gigs lisings


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: pavane
Date: 28 Apr 08 - 05:41 AM

Probably worth mentioning that Barry Skinner used to sing a version called The Treble Tail Gypsies, but unfortunately he can't remember exactly where he learned it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Saro
Date: 28 Apr 08 - 06:38 AM

CMR and the Askew sisters are working on a Hampshire version which gardiner collected from Mrs. Goodyear in 1907 (apologies if this has been mentioned earlier). It only mentions two gipsies, but Hampshire was a very poor county at the time so we probably couldn't afford any more... Though come to think of it, bearing in mind the area I live in, if more than two were seen walking around together they would probably have been arrested under some public order legislation, or maybe for singing or whistling in public without a license, but I digress...

Incidentally has anyone heard a song which tells a sequel to the 7 (or what you will) Gipsies?   In this song, the lady returns a year or more later, cold and hungry and with a baby. Her former husband invites her in, gives her food and money, but then tells her to go away for ever, as he can never forgive her for deserting him. I haven't heard any other replies giving the man's point of view before.

Saro


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 24 Mar 09 - 11:36 AM

THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSIES is mentioned in A History of Music in England by Ernest Walker (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1907):
    But historical doubts need not hinder us from enjoying the music that, within the last ten years or so, has begun to pour in upon us from all parts of England ... [such as] ... 'The wraggle-taggle gipsies' (Somerset Folk-songs, vol. i) ....
I have been unable to identify any book with the exact title "Somerset Folk-Songs" so I suspect he meant "Folk Songs from Somerset" gathered and edited with pianoforte accompaniment, by Cecil J. Sharp and Charles L. Marson (London: Simpkin, 1905).

The latter book doesn't seem to be viewable online.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Terry McDonald
Date: 24 Mar 09 - 12:34 PM

Saro - eleven months late, but Barry Dransfield has a last verse to 'Gypsy Davey' on his 'Wings of the Sphinx' album which goes:

The Master he went home that night
And took good care of his baby-o
And e're six months had passed and gone
He's married another lady-o.

Not quite what you mentioned, but a (presumably) satisfactory conclusion for the husband.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Thomas
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 12:32 PM

I have a book called "English folk-songs for schools" from the turn of the last century, I think collated by Cecil Sharp and Sabine Baring Gould witch does say he collected a version from Somerset. the song is entitled "No. 1. The Wraggle Taggle Gipsies, O!". In the intro for the book it is stated it comes from "Folk-songs from Somerset" by Mr. Sharp and Rev. C Marson...


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Diva
Date: 29 Jul 09 - 03:59 AM

Heard a version last year from a singer from home (Ayrshire) that actually mentions Ayr, Dalrymple and Maybole. I was talking to Joe Rae of Beith at the weekend and he informs me Child got the dates wrong. For those who do not know him Joe is an oracle and his wealth of knowledge of songs and ballads is superb.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Gypsy Laddie / Blackjack Davey
From: Genie
Date: 26 Sep 09 - 12:53 PM

Maybe someone can help me with this.

Right now Wikipedia (that oh, so, reliable source!) has this blurb about the origins of the song "Gypsy Laddie" and it's variants:

[["The ballad, according to Tosches, retells the story of John Faw, a 17th century outlaw, described as a Gypsy, and Lady Jane Hamilton, wife of John Kennedy, 6th Earl of Cassilis. Lord Cassilis led a band of men (some sources say 16, other 7) to abduct her. They were caught and hanged on the "Dool Tree" in 1643. The "Gypsies" were killed (except for one, who escaped) and Lady Jane Hamilton was imprisoned for the remainder of her life, dying in 1642."]]

Wikipedia: The Gypsy Laddie

I know that Barry said above that no connection has been established between any Cassilis and a gypsy, but I'm also curious as to whether whoever submitted that info at Wiki meant to say that Johnny Faw (or another gypsy) led a band of men to abduct Lady Jane H.
It seems weird that if a husband led a band of men to rescue his wife from kidnappers it would be called "abduction" and even more odd that, even if the wife had willingly run off with the gypsies, the husband and his cohorts would be hanged for "abducting" his own wife from the gypsies.
Lord Cassilis was not hanged, was he?


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Reinhard
Date: 26 Sep 09 - 03:54 PM

Also, it's quite implausible that the gypsies were hanged a year after Lady Hamilton's death. I'd rather have expected an immediate trial and execution.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST
Date: 10 May 12 - 03:53 PM

The great version of "Black Jack Davey" done on "Songcatcher II The Tradition That Inspired The Movie" was sung by Almeda Riddle. Someone earlier had mentioned this. I think she deserves to be named. She kept over 500 ballads in her repetoire, and often had numerous versions of the same songs. She was born in 1898 and was an incredible lady.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Amy
Date: 08 Sep 12 - 09:42 PM

Another variation on the theme:

Beggars to God
Words & Music by Bob Franke

The song of Gypsy Davy rang delighted through the night
The wise & foolish virgin kept her candle burning bright
Rise up my young & foolish one & follow if you can
There'll be no need for candles in the arms of such a man

Chorus:

Make love to each other, be free with each other
Be prisoners of love til you lie in the sod
Be friends to each other, forgive one another
See God in each other: be beggars to God

The night was cold & dark & wet as they wandered on alone
The sky became their canopy, the earth became their throne
And as their raiment ran to rags, they thought it nothing wrong
For earth & sky are robe enough when you sing the Gypsies' song

They sang & played the Gypsies' song wherever they were sent
To some it seemed a dancing tune - to some, a sad lament
But in ev'ry heart that heard them true a tear became a smile
And a pauper or a prince became a Gypsy for a while

©1983 Telephone Pole Music Publishing Co(BMI)


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 10 Sep 12 - 06:42 AM

Interesting piece (to me anyway) from 'Chambers's Miscellany of Useful and Entertaining Tracts, Vol 16' William and Robert Chambers (eds.), Edinburgh, 1847
Jim Carroll

ANECDOTES OF THE SCOTTISH GIPSIES.

One of the earliest anecdotes of the Scottish gipsies is that of "Johnnie Faa, the Gipsy Laddie," who eloped with the lady of the Earl of Cassilis. This story rests on tradition, and on an old ballad; the facts, so far as they can he gathered, are thus related in the "Picture of Scotland." "John, the sixth Earl of Cassilis, a stern Covenanter, of whom it is recorded by Bishop Burnet that he would never permit his language to he understood but in its direct sense, obtained to wife Lady Jean Hamilton, a daughter of Thomas, first Earl of Haddington, who had raised himself from the Scottish bar to a peerage, and the best fortune of his time. The match seems to have been dictated by policy; and it is not likely that Lady Jean herself had much to say in the bargain. On the contrary, says report, she had been previously beloved by a gallant young knight, a Sir John Faa of Dunbar, who had perhaps seen her at her father's seat of Tyningham, which is not more than three miles from that town. When several years were gone, and Lady Cassilis had brought her husband three children, this passion led to a dreadful catastrophe. Her youthful lover, seizing an opportunity when the Earl of Cassilis was attending the Assembly of Divines at Westminster, came to Cassilis Castle, a massive old tower, on the banks of the Doon. He was dis¬guised as a gipsy, and attended by a band of these desperate out¬casts. The countess consented to elope with her lover. Ere they had proceeded very far, however, the earl came home, and immediately set out in pursuit. Accompanied by a band which put resistance out of the question, he overtook them, and captured the whole party at a ford over the Doon, still called the ' Gipsies' Steps,' a few miles from the castle. He brought them back to Cassilis, and there hanged all the gipsies, including the hapless Sir John, upon ' the Dule Tree,' a splendid and most umbrageous plane, which yet nourishes on a mound, in front of the castle gate, and which was his gallows in ordinary, as the name testifies—

'And we were fifteen weel-made men,
Although we were na bonnie;
And we were a' put down for ane—
A fair young wanton lady.'

The countess was taken by her husband to a window in front of the castle, and there compelled to survey the dreadful scene—to-see, one after another, fifteen gallant men put to death—and at last to witness the dying agonies of him who had first been dear to her. The particular room in the stately old house where the unhappy lady endured this horrible torture, is still called ' The Countess's Room.' After undergoing a short confinement in that apartment, the house belonging to the family at Maybole was fitted up for her reception, by the addition of a fine projecting staircase, upon which were carved heads, representing those of her lover and his band; and she was removed thither, and con¬fined for the rest of her life—the earl, in the meantime, marry¬ing another wife. One of her daughters was afterwards married! to the celebrated Gilbert Burnet. The effigies of the gipsies oh the staircase at Maybole are very minute; the head of Johnnie Faa himself is distinct from the rest, large, and more lachry¬mose in the expression of the features." Such is the story; but whether the hero, who is here called Sir John Faa of Dunbar, was himself of gipsy blood, as the ballad bears, and as tradition asserts, or whether he was merely in such intimacy with the gipsies as to obtain their aid in the adventure, cannot be decisively ascertained. It may be mentioned, however, that the colony of gipsies long-established in Yetholm, in Roxburghshire, always claimed to be of the same stock with the Faws or Falls, a family of respecta¬bility settled in East-Lothian, and of which the hero of the ballad may have been a scion, holding some rank in Scottish society, and yet keeping- up a connexion with his outcast kindred.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: Ged Fox
Date: 10 Sep 12 - 02:31 PM

The version in Baring-Gould's Songs of the West has the wife as a gipsy woman, married against her inclinations to an earl (The Gipsy Countess, part 1.) In the second part, the wife runs away back to the gipsies, but when she rejects the earl and his wealth, and says she'll sleep in the wide open field,
" 'Nay, thou shalt not!'
Then he drew, I wot,
The sword that hung at his saddle bow.
And once he smote at her lily-white throat,
And there her red blood down did flow.

Then stained with blood, was the posie good,
THat was of the wildest flow'rs that blow.
She sank on her side, and so she died,
For she would away with the gipsies-o"


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy
From: GUEST,Rob Currie
Date: 19 Sep 12 - 01:14 PM

What has always intrigued me about this song is the melody; it doesn't feel at all like it comes from the British Isles, to me. There are references above to there being versions from elsewhere in Europe. Anyone ever read anything about the tune itself? Is it, say, Roma in origin, or is that too twee?


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