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Lyr Req: Songs about refugees

McGrath of Harlow 20 Feb 00 - 07:21 PM
Metchosin 20 Feb 00 - 07:52 PM
dick greenhaus 20 Feb 00 - 11:11 PM
Callie 21 Feb 00 - 01:06 AM
The Shambles 21 Feb 00 - 03:26 AM
Osmium 21 Feb 00 - 04:48 AM
The Shambles 21 Feb 00 - 07:00 AM
McGrath of Harlow 21 Feb 00 - 01:53 PM
GUEST,Les B 21 Feb 00 - 03:00 PM
Pinetop Slim 21 Feb 00 - 05:39 PM
McGrath of Harlow 21 Feb 00 - 07:08 PM
Osmium 21 Feb 00 - 07:13 PM
McGrath of Harlow 21 Feb 00 - 07:21 PM
McGrath of Harlow 21 Feb 00 - 07:24 PM
Osmium 21 Feb 00 - 07:31 PM
Mary G 21 Feb 00 - 10:10 PM
Pinetop Slim 22 Feb 00 - 06:24 AM
Áine 22 Feb 00 - 09:38 AM
McGrath of Harlow 22 Feb 00 - 02:14 PM
Mary G 22 Feb 00 - 11:30 PM
katlaughing 23 Feb 00 - 01:15 AM
Áine 23 Feb 00 - 10:06 AM
Áine 23 Feb 00 - 02:08 PM
katlaughing 15 Jul 00 - 06:29 PM
freda underhill 28 Jul 08 - 06:04 PM
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Subject: Refugees
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 20 Feb 00 - 07:21 PM

I've just been writing an angry letter to our local paper in response to someone who'd been sounding off about "asylum seekers" and refugees taking the houses that should belong to good English people (and the daft thing was, his name was no more English than mine is ).

Anyway, there's a big thing in the media in England at the moment about this, lsrgely because of the recent case of a hijacked aeroplane from Afghanistan full of passengers, most of whom want to stay here, and Jack Straw, the minster in charge of that sort of thing, has said they will all be sent back if he can manage it. (And he's from a family that came here a few decades ago as refugees...)

So I was thinking what kind of songs might relate to that kind of nonsense, and (apart from a couple I've written) the only one I could think of is Woody uthrie's "Deportees/Plane Crash at Los Gatos." So can anybody think of any others?


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Metchosin
Date: 20 Feb 00 - 07:52 PM

McGrath, John Chinaman, My Jo, sadly also represents that kind of mindset. The more things change the more they stay the same.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 20 Feb 00 - 11:11 PM

Also Twelve Hundred More...


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Callie
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 01:06 AM

The situation in Australia is the same. I heard a disgraceful talk back radio host describing an Indonesian refugee camp as "a five star hotel - they can even do a spot of fishing, coz that's what THOSE people are used to". I don't know any Australian songs relating to refugees. We sure need some now. -Callie


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: The Shambles
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 03:26 AM

Islands and oasis.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Osmium
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 04:48 AM

McGrath

You sure know how to sart them!

Whils't most of us have great sympathy for refugees from wherever the problem with the particular case you mention is the way they got here. The last thing I would like to meet on a plane is a man with a gun telling me I'm going somewhere else.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: The Shambles
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 07:00 AM

The two things that prompted 'Islands and oasis, were the vessels that would seek shelter in the lee of the islands I have lived on and the similar reaction to the one that Kevin describes, that I saw on a TV 'chat' show.

The lady was making the point that 'we' should look after 'our' own homeless folk before we housed 'others'. If I felt that she had ever given much thought to the care of our homeless, I may have been a little more understanding of her views. She seemed far more concerned with the possible effect on the value of her house.

We seem to be more tolerant of the greed of those who have more homes than they can possible live in, that we do of those who have experienced true horror and who just want to share the peace of our 'simple life'?


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 01:53 PM

If I'd been a jew or a gypsy on a plane in Nazi Germany, and a bloke with a gun had popped up and hijacked it to take it to somewhere else, I reckon I'd have been quite pleased. And my understanding is that that is how most of the people on the Afghanistan plane felt.

The fact that people who weren't anything to do with the hi-jack felt that way is an indication of how bad things are, and why they should be allowed to stay.

Remember when people making a break for it from East Germany were seen as heroes to be welcomed with open arms. It was a lot less dangerously unpleasant living in East Germany than it is in Afghanistan these days, I am led to believe.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: GUEST,Les B
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 03:00 PM

Another song that speaks to the issue, along with the above mentioned "John Chinaman," is "No Irish Need Apply"


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Pinetop Slim
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 05:39 PM

McGrath: Please share the songs you've written on the topic.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ENDLESS ROADS
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 07:08 PM

Here's one of them, The Endless Roads - it's more about "ethnic cleansing" and being a refugee, rather than about escaping and being deported back to the place you've escaped from.

That's link is to where I've got the song on my website, with chords, though no tune. But just in case it doesn't click through, here it is. (If the line breaks don't work, I'll post again with them in.:

THE ENDLESS ROADS

Here is a journey without an ending,
Through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

To our lost homes there is no returning,
The stranger dwells where we lived so long
And a bitter taste now is all that's left now
Of that lost land which is forever gone.
A last farewell now to all we've known now,
We turn our backs as we turn the wheel.
We turn our backs now on our burning homes now,
The broken past and the killing fields.

Here is a journey without an ending,
Through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

From Sarajevo to far Soweto,
From Guatemala and Belfast,
From Sad Kosovo, and the Warsaw Ghetto,
With empty hands, and a heart of glass.
To Babylon we were carried captive,
From Palestine, where the stranger rules,
We eat our bread now in this house of exile,
Where the strong grow weak and the wise are fools.

Here is a journey without an ending,
Through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

And those who'd kill us were once our brothers,
And those who help us may yet be foes,
To take their turn place on this wheel of hatred,
That drives us out down those endless roads.
And so it goes, will it be forever
Till the wheel stops and the madness ends?
Look down in pity on this world of exiles,
And teach us some way we can start again.

Here is a journey without an ending,
Through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

12th May 1993 (put on this website 4th April 1999)

A song about what is chillingly called "ethnic cleansing" these days. When I wrote this it was happening in another part of what had been Yugoslavia. Now it's Kosovo. But the list in verse two could (and has) included so many places. Today's refugees turn into tomorrow's persecutors. Croats who've been driven from their homes in turn drive out Serbs who in turn drive out Albanians. Survivors of the Holocaust drive Palestinians from their homes.

I wish I could believe that this is a song that wouldn't keep on being topical. The tune I sing it to is not unlike that of "The Bleacher Lassie of Kelvinhaugh", which would be a good tune to use for it anyway.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Osmium
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 07:13 PM

McGrath of harlow

Point taken but it would have been easier for Jack Straw if everyone on the plane had wanted to do the trip wouldn't it?


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 07:21 PM

Bugger. Now here it is with the breaks.

The Endless Roads
(Chorus)Here is a journey without an ending,
Through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

To our lost homes there is no returning,
the stranger dwells where we lived so long
and a bitter taste now is all that's left now
of that lost land which is forever gone.
A last farewell now to all we've known now,
now,we turn our backs as we turn the wheel.
We turn our backs now on our burning homes now,
the broken past and the killing fields.

Here is a journey without an ending,
through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

From Sarajevo to far Soweto,
from Guatamala and Belfast,
from Sad Kosovo, and the Warsaw Ghetto,
with empty hands, and a heart of glass.
To Babylon we were carried captive,
from Palestine, where the stranger rules,
we eat our bread now in this house of exile,
where the strong grow weak, and the wise are fools.

Here is a journey without an ending,
through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

And those who'd kill us were once our brothers,
and those who help us may yet be foes,
to take their turn place on this wheel of hatred,
that drives us out down those endless roads.
And so it goes, will it be forever
till the wheel stops and the madness ends?
Look down in pity on this world of exiles,
and teach us some way we can start again.

Here is a journey without an ending,
through rugged mountains and snow and ice.
Can there be victory in such a struggle?
Can there be freedom, at such a price?

12th May 1993 (put on this website 4th April 1999)

A song about what is chillingly called "ethnic cleansing" these days. When I wrote this it was happening in another part of what had been Yugoslavia. Now it's Kosovo. But the list in verse two could (and has) included so many places. Today's refugees turn into tomorrow's persecutors. Croats who've been driven from their homes in turn drive out Serbs who in turn drive out Albanians, who frive out Serbs. Survivors of the Holocaust drive Palestinians from their homes.

I wish I could believe that this is a song that wouldn't keep on being topical. The tune I sing it to is not unlike that of "The Bleacher Lassie of Kelvinhaugh", which would be a good tune to use for it anyway.

What I'm reminded of by the business refugees being deported "home" is of the time when escaped slaves were being sent back into slavery. But at least when that happened it wasn't a popular thing to do - now we've got tabloid newspapers read by millions urging Jack Straw to send the foreigners home.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 07:24 PM

Yes Osmium, I suppose they could have advertised the trip in advance...


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Osmium
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 07:31 PM

The end can't always suit the means; there is a line beyond which one can't go or you will end up justifying just the type of actions you clearly so deplore. Maybe we should start another thread and discuss the place of law in today's society; there's more than a few folk songs to go with it!"


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Mary G
Date: 21 Feb 00 - 10:10 PM

Here's a song about refugee kids I worked with. Names are real.

Maybe from Galway and maybe Saigon
The ships to American sail right along
And the first words they hear on America's shore:
"Go away! Go away! We can't take any more.

CHORUS: "For it's getting too crowded here under the flag,
And you're noisy and dirty and carry the plague,
So we will tell you what our folks heard before:
'Go away! Go away! We can't take any more.'"

Someday I'll ask every young refugee
"Where did you come from and what did you see?
What sorrow? what famine? what slaughter? what war?
How much did you take till you couldn't take more?"

So Carlos and Dang and Phat and Rashid
And Tuck and Mohammed grow up with good speed
And forget when we met you, we ranted and swore:
"Go away! Go away! We can't take any more."

And when you are citizens duly sworn in,
You'll go down to where others before you have been
And greet the next ship to America's shore:
"Go away! Go away! We can't take any more."


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Pinetop Slim
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 06:24 AM

Very moving songs, McGrath and Mary G. The lines "look down and pity on this world of exiles" and "go away, go away we can't take anymore" will stick with me for a long while. Any chance we can hear these on Mudcat Radio or elsewhere?


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Áine
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 09:38 AM

Dear Kevin and Mary G,

May I please place your songs in the Mudcat Songbook? They are both too good to disappear into the thread ether. And I'm with markf, could we please hear these on the Mudcat Radio sometime?

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 02:14 PM

Any song I write I'd be honoured to have you put in the Songbook, Áine. I'm glad you like that one. Mary G's looks a great song, I'd love to jhear it.

I'll get the song across the Atlantic one way or another. (Did I read you say somewhere that the tape I sent Max with a few songs on it got chewed up in the machine?)

To get back to the last post I did, and the original query I raised - are there any extant songs about slaves being sent back to slavery? And any more refugee ones?


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Mary G
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 11:30 PM

oh you can always put anything of mine anywhere...once I get the music end of my computer figured out I'll send a tune..

mg


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: katlaughing
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 01:15 AM

Wow, great songs, both of you! Thank you for sharing them.

Kevin, I agree with you, if I lived in Afghanistan right now I think I would be very grateful to be hijacked to London; almost anything would be better than living the way so many do, esp. the women I wrote about here. Hard to imagine anything being worse.

kat


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Áine
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 10:06 AM

Dear Mary G,

What is the title of your song? I'm ready to put it into the Songbook, but I need a name. Also, if you like to add any comments about the song, I'd be glad to put them on your songpage.

Thanks to both you and Kevin for sharing these great songs with all of us.

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: Áine
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 02:08 PM

I've posted McGrath and Mary G's songs to the Mudcat Songbook.

Mary G, I hope you don't mind, but I gave your song the title We Can't Take Any More, just so I could get it up on the Songbook. If you'd like to change the title, please let me know and I will do so ASAP.

Thanks again to you both, Áine


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: katlaughing
Date: 15 Jul 00 - 06:29 PM

I thought some of you might like to see an update on the situation for women and their supporters in Afghanistan and how the Internet is helping them:

CNN, July 14, 2000
Afghan women unite in cyberspace against Taliban repression

From Interactive Correspondent Allison Tom

ATLANTA (CNN) -- The fight for democracy and the rights of women in Afghanistan is being seen and heard with the help of today's modern technology

The Internet has become instrumental in drawing attention to the cause, and an independent political organization called the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, is using cyberspace as the key tool in spreading the word.

"It really was the only tool that enabled us to be in contact with other people in other countries and we think it is the only tool that can tell people around the world about the suffering of our people, of our women and children and the way that they can help us," RAWA lobbyist 'Sajeda' told CNN.

'Sajeda' does not show her face and uses a fake name to protect her identity.

She and another activist are currently in the United States telling people about life in Afghanistan under the Taliban rule.

No school, no work, no play

In recent years, the Islamic Taliban has imposed new restrictions on women; particularly in employment, travel and education.

"Taliban officially announced all of these restrictions on women, that they are not allowed to go to school, they are not allowed to work, not allowed to go outside without being accompanied with a close male relative."

RAWA's Web site carries photos, documents and reports of alleged atrocities in Afghanistan.

Offline, emails are shared with women in refugee camps and inside Afghanistan who do not have access to the Internet.

"They, with tears in their eyes, they say -- so we are not alone and there are still people they take care about our suffering and they want to help us," 'Sehar' said.

Others, including Mavis Nicholson Leno agree that the Internet has a profound impact on humanitarian issues. Leno, wife of U.S. television comedian Jay Leno, is a spokesperson for the Feminist Majority Foundation.

"It creates a brilliant way to have a very active participation in world politics, particularly with regard to human rights, a way that was never available to people without the Internet," Leno said.

And for RAWA, the Web also acts as a virtual headquarters for the group. The site is administered by supporters in Pakistan.

You can find the report and movie clips on: http://www.cnn.com/2000/ASIANOW/central/07/13/afghan.women/index.html

Los Angeles Times, July 8, 2000

Internet Gives a Voice to Afghan Women's Cause

Rights: Two activists tell Southland audiences of struggles under their country's harsh Taliban government.

By ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, Times Staff Writer

Sajeda and Sehar once toiled in harsh obscurity for the rights of women in their home country of Afghanistan. Soft-spoken, petite and incredibly young-looking, they and their fellow women's rights activists were spat on, beaten and labeled "loose women" in Pakistan by supporters of their country's Taliban government after the Taliban took control of most of Afghanistan in 1996, barring girls from school and women from the workplace.

Letters from abroad were encouraging, but rare.

Based in the remote Pakistani border town of Peshawar, they took their isolation for granted until their movement--the Revolutionary Assn. of the Women of Afghanistan--created a Web site. Suddenly the world was knocking on their door.

People from around the globe got in touch, showed up to interview them, or invited them to travel abroad to speak on the plight of Afghan women. Now in Los Angeles after an East Coast swing, they're still marveling over the transformation.

Their revolution may not be televised, but it is online.

"It is because of the Internet that we are here today," said Sajeda, who like Sehar is appearing under an assumed name to avoid arrest during trips into Afghanistan. "It was really a revolution. We had no idea the Web site would have such an impact on our work."

In Southern California, where their schedule is being publicized by e-mail and listed on Web sites (such as www.labridge.com/ change-links/Afghani.htm), they are in demand.

They will speak at the Midnight Special Bookstore on Santa Monica's Third Street Promenade today and at All Saints Church in Pasadena on Sunday. On Thursday, they will appear at the Simon Wiesenthal Center Museum of Tolerance, which is setting up an interactive exhibit on the Taliban that will open in the fall.

"Everything we've heard about the Taliban is so outrageous," said Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the center's associate dean. "That kind of situation, in the 21st century, is deeply disturbing. We have a moral obligation to make sure this kind of situation is presented with a human face."

Sajeda and Sehar have already spoken on the radio, at cafes in Altadena and San Pedro, and to more than 100 people at a Caltech appearance.

They are telling audiences about the abrupt, almost overnight curtailment of women's civil rights in Afghanistan after the Taliban seized power.

Women--who had constituted 70% of schoolteachers, 40% of physicians, 60% of university teachers and half of government workers and students--were ordered out of their jobs and in many cases relegated, in the words of Amnesty International, to being "prisoners in their own homes."

Sajeda wants to tell people what she says she saw on a recent trip to Afghanistan: women allowed to die from easily treatable conditions--diabetes, appendicitis--because male doctors are not allowed to see female patients and female doctors are largely forbidden from practicing.

Women and Men Are Treated Harshly

She said she also saw starving war widows reduced to begging and prostitution to feed their children because of the nearly absolute ban on female employment. Families must risk their peace of mind to send little girls to clandestine schools to defy a ban on female education.

Women who defy the restrictions are subject to public lashings. Some women have even reportedly had their fingers chopped off as punishment for wearing nail polish. Suicide among women has reportedly soared.

Sajeda said many men and members of ethnic minority groups have also been harshly treated by the Taliban, a movement that espouses a mercurial and conservative interpretation of Islamic doctrine which Sajeda views as a pretext for simple fascism.

"Taliban has misused the name of culture to attack women," Sajeda said. "Our culture was never that crude. Education was valued."

To provide education for girls, she said, the Revolutionary Assn. of the Women of Afghanistan has helped to organize home schools in Afghanistan and literacy classes for adult women. The group sends mobile teams into the country with such basic necessities as insulin, and trains women to serve as nurses in their communities, she said.

"It's all underground," Sajeda said. "It is very difficult for us to operate there."

Association supporters also smuggle out photos and human rights information for their Web site (http://www.rawa.org/) on such events as the stoning to death of adulterers, creating a sort of online underground stretching from the Middle East to the West Coast and beyond.

One of those who stumbled across that Web site was K.J. Vickery, who is writing her USC thesis on international women's rights.

"Having access to women's stories immediately and not having it filtered through the news media or other organizations is really helpful as a researcher," said Vickery, who was one of the hosts for Sajeda's and Sehar's visit.

Until the women's association created a Web site, it relied on a magazine sold by activists in markets and on street corners in Pakistan. That nation, home to a large Afghan exile community including many Taliban supporters, is not exactly a haven; the group's founder was assassinated there in 1987.

Unaccompanied women selling the magazine have been attacked by pro-Taliban fundamentalists in Pakistan, and activists like Sajeda and Sehar say they have taken to carrying sticks under their veils for protection. Men help by acting as chaperons.

"There are men who have tears in their eyes when they see us selling magazines," Sehar said. "They say, 'You are so brave.'

"Many men who once opposed RAWA now support us," Sehar said. "They work as guards, accompanying women to meetings or interviews, driving them around. Male relatives are very supportive, but they worry about the danger. They say, 'You're going to be killed.' "

In low-tech Afghanistan, the magazine is more practical, but the Web site is the women's association's face shown to the world. It is administered by supporters in Pakistan, many of them men.

Its graphics are not for the faint at heart.

There are photos, smuggled out of Afghanistan, of smiling Taliban militants parading amputated hands and feet through the streets of Kabul, following public punishments for robbery and other crimes.

Like all Web sites, the association's gets its fair share of negative e-mail--often in several languages. It's not the usual spam.

"They say, 'You are a prostitute's organization,' " Sajeda said. " 'You will be killed. I am your enemy. I will kill you.' "

The Afghan association is one of a growing number of women's groups worldwide that use the Internet to draw attention to their issues.

"Geographic boundaries really begin to disappear with the Internet," said Gregory Stock, director of programs for UCLA's science, technology and society program. "They can open a dialogue, at very low cost. It changes the game."

Copyright 2000 Los Angeles Times

From: http://www.latimes.com/news/state/20000708/t000064230.html

===================================================== Please sign our petition at: http://www.rawa.org/petition.htm and tell your friends about it to support Afghan women. ===================================================== ~ Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) ~ Mailing Address: RAWA,
P.O.Box 374,
Quetta, Pakistan
~ Mobile: 0092-300-551638
~ Fax: 001-760-2819855
~ E-mails: rawa@rawa.org, rawa@geocities.com
~ Home Page: http://www.rawa.org
~ Mirror site: http://members.xoom.com/ra_wa

Sorry if this shows up twice...I hope I got it stopped in time to finish the lin breaks.


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Subject: RE: Refugees
From: freda underhill
Date: 28 Jul 08 - 06:04 PM

There is talk that Australia's (still) new Labour government will bring an end to the policy of mandatory detention of refugees. I found the following article:

Govt to ease immigrant detention policy
July 28, 2008 - sydney morning herald

The Rudd government will reportedly step back from the hardline immigration policy of mandatory detention for asylum seekers. The ABC on Monday night reported Immigration Minister Chris Evans is to announce sweeping changes to the policy in a speech in Canberra on Tuesday.

Senator Evans will announce a shift toward detaining only people who pose a risk to the community, the report said. The government will also stop detaining asylum seekers for long periods and will offer legal assistance to those denied a visa...


This will conclude a dark and dangerous period for Australia, a period which has seen legal rights for all Australians diminished. This new government keeps proving that it cares about human rights, and after many difficult years working with refugees I'm extremely pleased.

freda


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