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Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain

DigiTrad:
ADALIDA
CHARLIE RUTLEDGE
LAKES OF PONCHARTRAIN
LAKES OF PONCHARTRAIN 2
LAKES OF THE PONCHARTRAIN (4)
THE LAKES OF PONTCHARTRAIN 3


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Lakes of Pontchartrain (113)
Lyr Req: The Man That Shot the Dog (Mick Quinn) (22)
Question about Lakes of Pontchartrain song (36)
Spelling of 'Pontchartrain' ? (16)
Lyr Req: Lakes of Ponchetrain? / Ponchartrain (47)
Lyr/Chords Req: Lakes Of Ponchartrain (Deanta) (13)
Lyr Req: Lakes of Pontchartrain - Irish Words (77)
Lyr Req: On the Banks of Lake Pontchartrain (13)
Lakes of Ponchartrain through Irish lang (7)
Lyr Req: Lakes of Ponchartrain (from Sam Henry) (16)
(origins) Origins: Lakes of Ponchartrain (2) (closed)
Lakes of Ponchartrain (20)
Banks of Ponchatran...how old? (17)
Recording Req: Lakes of Ponchartrain (17)
Inf. Lakes of Ponchatrain? / Ponchartrain (4) (closed)


PoppaGator 12 Oct 12 - 06:09 PM
GUEST,leeneia 03 Oct 12 - 05:46 PM
GUEST,DTM 03 Oct 12 - 01:50 PM
michaelr 02 Oct 12 - 08:53 PM
dick greenhaus 02 Oct 12 - 08:40 PM
GUEST,leeneia 02 Oct 12 - 10:34 AM
GUEST,threelegsoman 02 Oct 12 - 07:33 AM
GUEST 01 Oct 12 - 05:06 PM
GUEST,dermie 16 Aug 10 - 01:26 PM
maple_leaf_boy 04 Aug 10 - 02:52 PM
GUEST 04 Aug 10 - 02:21 PM
GUEST 04 Aug 10 - 09:11 AM
GUEST,Jeff Lester 27 Oct 09 - 11:08 AM
GUEST,Desi 31 Aug 09 - 05:59 AM
dick greenhaus 16 Jun 04 - 12:01 AM
Seamus Kennedy 15 Jun 04 - 02:33 AM
johnfitz.com 14 Jun 04 - 11:58 PM
Malcolm Douglas 14 Jun 04 - 11:13 PM
Seamus Kennedy 14 Jun 04 - 11:01 PM
ship*scat 14 Jun 04 - 07:01 PM
Big Al Whittle 13 Jun 04 - 08:42 PM
akenaton 13 Jun 04 - 06:11 PM
Big Al Whittle 13 Jun 04 - 04:55 PM
Desert Dancer 13 Jun 04 - 02:21 PM
Big Al Whittle 13 Jun 04 - 01:44 PM
GUEST,ChildoftheSea 13 Jun 04 - 10:01 AM
Malcolm Douglas 29 Jan 03 - 07:48 PM
GUEST,Q 29 Jan 03 - 07:30 PM
Malcolm Douglas 29 Jan 03 - 09:06 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 29 Jan 03 - 04:01 AM
GUEST,Bill Kennedy 28 Jan 03 - 10:06 AM
alanabit 28 Jan 03 - 03:58 AM
Jon Bartlett 28 Jan 03 - 03:41 AM
GUEST,Gwonya 27 Jan 03 - 11:19 PM
masato sakurai 27 Jan 03 - 08:25 PM
Amos 27 Jan 03 - 07:57 PM
masato sakurai 27 Jan 03 - 07:18 PM
GUEST,Q 27 Jan 03 - 06:49 PM
masato sakurai 27 Jan 03 - 06:46 PM
masato sakurai 27 Jan 03 - 06:06 PM
mooman 27 Jan 03 - 05:13 PM
TIA 27 Jan 03 - 04:25 PM
GUEST,Q 27 Jan 03 - 04:15 PM
GUEST,Q 27 Jan 03 - 03:44 PM
Amos 27 Jan 03 - 03:39 PM
GUEST,Q 27 Jan 03 - 03:38 PM
Loqui 27 Jan 03 - 03:38 PM
MartinRyan 27 Jan 03 - 03:38 PM
GUEST,Q 27 Jan 03 - 03:34 PM
Jon Whitney 02 Jul 97 - 07:25 PM
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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: PoppaGator
Date: 12 Oct 12 - 06:09 PM

The Wikipedia quote (above, posted last week on 2 Oct 12) is even less trustworthy than most Wiki info ~ for starters, Andrew Jackson was NEVER Governor of Louisiana. To my mind, this level of ignorance puts the entire article in doubt.

Also: Jackson TN is pretty far away from NO, especially for a 19th century narrator who never gets any further north than Lake Pontchartrain. Jackson MS is quite a bit closer, and Jackson LA even closer than that, and both are better candidates for consderation as the song's "Jackson town."

My own favorite theory links the song to the brief wave of Irish immigration into New Orleans in the 1830s, a response to the first Great Famine that occurred when immigrant labor was being recruitted to dig the New Basin Canal. So many workers on that project died of yellow fever* that word got back to Ireland, and the Irish never again emigrated to New Orleans in significant numbers.

I will grant that the line about "foreign money" strongly suggests a Civil War timeframe, due to the existence of USA and CSA currency. That does not preclude an earlier origin, however, since paper money was issued by banks in the early 19th century, not by the national government(s), and would not always be recognized as valid outside a local area.

I am NOT going to reiterate my customarily lengthy spiel about the possible origin of this lovely song; I've done so too many times already, and anyone interested can scan through the "related threads" listed above.

*Somewhere in one of those other threads, I mistakenly equated "yellow fever" with malaria, and got called on it. My bad: malaria's old-fashoined colloquial name was "yellow jaundice, not "yellow fever."


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 03 Oct 12 - 05:46 PM

Dick Greenhaus says he's heard at least four distinct tunes. I bet the tune that I learned from a local band is the fifth. That has made this a pretty confusing thread, to tell you the truth.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,DTM
Date: 03 Oct 12 - 01:50 PM

FWIW, the tune sounds kinda similar to 'The Wild Colonial Boy' to me.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: michaelr
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 08:53 PM

Guest, threelegsoman, Nancy was talking about another song, "On the Banks of the Old Pontchartrain", which was recorded by Hank Williams.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 08:40 PM

There are at least 4 pretty distinct tunes I've heard to "Lakes of Ponchartrain". Asking for chords without specifying which tune is a lost cause.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 10:34 AM

Here's an amateur video which shows what the landscape is like around Lake Ponchartrain. The camera shakes sometime, and you need to turn your volume down to nothing so you don't hear the irritating lounge music which the maker added as background. But it's worth seeing the kind of country where the lost soldier/criminal found himself after running from trouble.

cypresses and water

See how strange it is? See how different it is from Texas, Tennessee, New Orleans or Ireland? How does he make a living, how does he survive here? He's totally dependent on the people who helped him and who knew the way of life in the bayous.

When you sing this, try to get that landscape into the song.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,threelegsoman
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 07:33 AM

Perhaps Nancy you should get in touch with Wikipedia who make the following notes on the origin of this song:

The exact origin of the song is unknown, though it is commonly held to have originated in the southern United States in the 19th century. In the liner notes of Déanta's album Ready for the Storm, which includes the song, it is described as a "traditional Creole love song." The liner notes accompanying Planxty's version state that the tune was probably brought back by soldiers fighting for the British or French armies in Louisiana and Canada in the War of 1812. Although the tune might date to that period, the popular lyrics undoubtedly came much later, since they tell of taking a railway train from New Orleans to "Jackson Town". This was most likely to be the railway junction town of Jackson, Tennessee (named in honor of Louisiana Governor, General Andrew Jackson). The line would have been the New Orleans, Jackson and Northern Railway—whose line, opened in the 1860s, included a pre-existing local line running north from downtown New Orleans along the shores of Lake Pontchartrain. Most likely, the lyrics date to the Civil War, and the reference to "foreign money" being "no good" could refer to either U. S. or Confederate currency, depending upon who was in control of the area at the time. It should also be noted that thousands of banks, during the civil war, issued their own bank notes, which could be rejected in various towns, depending on how trusted were the issuing bank. Also, the Confederacy and Union issued their own bank notes—as did individual States—leading to a proliferation of currency (notes and coinage) that might not be acceptable in a particular region.

My own version of the song can be found by clicking on the link:-
The Lakes of Pontchartrain


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Oct 12 - 05:06 PM

I would just like to set the record straight, no pun intended,I am the daughter of the late kathleen ramona vincent who wrote on the banks of the old ponchartrain, My mother was not crippled or from louisiana,she was from talented song writer and model from montgomery alabama,my name is nancy ricciardi,you can find me on facebook.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,dermie
Date: 16 Aug 10 - 01:26 PM

go to www.paulbrady.com, along the top there is a link that says "tabulature" and download and print off sheet music for Paul's Excellent, excelent version of this song.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: maple_leaf_boy
Date: 04 Aug 10 - 02:52 PM

'Twas (C)on a (G)dark and (Em)stormy (Am)night

(C)as I (Am)lately (F)took (G7)my (C)way,
      
Through windfalls (Em)thick with (Am or F)Devils grubs,

my (Em)aching feet did (F)stray,

Un(C)til at (Em)last by the (Am)evening (Em)star

some (Am)higher ground (F)I (G)gained (G7)

And (C)there I (G)met with a (Em)Creole (Am)girl

(C)by the (Am)Lakes of (F)Pon-(G7)char-(C)train.


I'm doing this by memory. This roughly how I used to play it.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Aug 10 - 02:21 PM

Sorry, GUEST; Danny O'Flaherty left New Orleans for good after Katrina in August '05. While the French Quarter was high and dry, unaffected by the flooding that decimated many newer neighborhoods throughout the city, there was significant wind and other damage to his pub, more than he was prepared to address.

He does perform in New Orleans periodically, and the annual Celtic Nations Festival, originally held in New Orleans, is now based about 250 miles to the west at Lake Charles, LA, near the Texas border.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Aug 10 - 09:11 AM

I played there O'Flaherty's Irish Channel Pub in the French Quarter in New Orleans 2001 and confirm the owner was a top man. Hope his pub survived.


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Jeff Lester
Date: 27 Oct 09 - 11:08 AM

A fine version from the Watkins Family Hour. Sean Watkins (guitar) and Sara Watkins (fiddle) from Nickel Creek with Gemma Hayes singing, Benmont Tench on piano, and Michael Witcher on dobro.

http://www.archive.org/download/wfh2005-04-13..flac16/wfh2005-04-13.flac/wfh2005-04-13t14_vbr.mp3


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Desi
Date: 31 Aug 09 - 05:59 AM

The ong, On The Banks Of The Old Ponchartrain, was written by Hank Williams Snr & Ramona Vincent in 1947, and recorded by Hank, you can hear him sing it on YouTube. I don't know if it's meant to be a version of Lakes Of Ponchartrain, but I'd reckon certainly influenced by it while having a different tune, and being a darn good song in it's own right

Desi in England


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 16 Jun 04 - 12:01 AM

There are other tunes besides the commonly sung ne. Elen Stekert collect a rather cheerful one from Fuzzy Barhight, a New York Lumberjack, and recorded it for Folkways.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 15 Jun 04 - 02:33 AM

Right, Malcolm. I'd love to hear Blarney Roses played slower than it normally is played.
And to paraphrase Bobert, it would sound good in dadgum tuning too.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: johnfitz.com
Date: 14 Jun 04 - 11:58 PM

It's very pretty played in a dadgad tuning. I absolutely love this song!


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 14 Jun 04 - 11:13 PM

Yes, I think you're right; or, rather, Blarney Roses is set to a speeded-up form of Caroline of Edinburgh Town (see my earlier post(s) on the tune family).


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 14 Jun 04 - 11:01 PM

I also think the melody is a slowed-down version of Where The Blarney Roses Grow.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: ship*scat
Date: 14 Jun 04 - 07:01 PM

I'm surprised no one has taken up Dick's challenge to draw some connection between this timeless song and the Irish. So here goes.

Since the 1840's, New Orleans has had a strong Irish connection. The Irish were the preferred form of labor for the local "navigation" canals. Slave holders were reluctant to jeapordize their valuable human capital in the yellow fever-infested swamp that was New Orleans outside the levee. If an Irishman died you just stop feeding him.

Those that survived canal digging formed a community that to this day is called the Irish Channel. It even has its equisitely ornate church, St Alphonsus, preserved as an Irish cultural center.

The cultural and physical chasm between, say the Ozarks and the isolated seaport of New Orleans is wide and deep. There doesn't seem to be much of a family balad singing tradition in New Orleans proper. For the past few years I've been dealing with the apparent value system that holds it impolite to sing on chorus or to sing at all. (Boy do I hope to be proven wrong on this one!) The Irish with their tradition of family and community music are thus prime candidates for coughing up this balad - themes and all.

Don't discount the nautical connection. Stan Huggil considers New Orleans to be one of a few American "Sailor Towns" (Boston isn't on the list). New Orleans' sailor town was the Vieux Carre or French Quarter for most of the 19th and into the 20th century. The bucko sailor tradition had to have contained its full measure of Irish matelos. With the exception of the basic theme of Bourbon Street, this seamier (and more musical) side of the French Quarter has been pretty well surpressed in favor of the more genteel (and less balad-full) creole image.

Finally, I'll leave for all to speculate about the likely source of a song that praises the beauty and honor of a "creole girl". This is not your typical deep south or even rural American concept in the 19th century but it is certainly a common idea in sea shanties.

Any takers? Ship*scat


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 08:42 PM

who is the lady who sings the harmony so beautifully on the last verse with Christy?


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: akenaton
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 06:11 PM

C of S....Try a listen to Martin Simpsons Cajun version of "The Lakes"
Its very different from the Planxty and Paul Brady versions,but I like it best of all....Ake


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 04:55 PM

Maggie Holland - I remembered


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 02:21 PM

Child of the Sea, to get your question answered, since it is a general one, not specific to the song discussed here, it might be better to start a new thread, with a subject line something like "Irish cd recommendations?". You might also consider trying various searches on songs that you like from that cd, to see what other artists and albums are mentioned (as weelittledrummer just did).

Also, if you become a Mudcat member, you can be send messages directly to you via this site -- "PM" or Personal Message -- so that a personal note like this one doesn't have to take up other people's time.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 01:44 PM

The first time I heard was the lady from Hot Vultures who used to sing with Ian anderson when she had a solo act - sorry the names's gone - bugger this euthymol disease. then Christy of course nd theres a fine version on the cd Noel Murphy did a couple of years ago.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,ChildoftheSea
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 10:01 AM

Wow! I recently picked up a celtic CD (one of those variety ones for $10 at Wally World) only to discover that I loved it completely. This site has been so helpful in helping me gather lyrics, info, and history for the songs that I had to say thanks! I would also like if anyone has recommendations for more celtic artists that like to sing the old traditional Irish songs, and perhaps what some of the songs are. Thanks alot!


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 07:48 PM

It's a pity that they acknowledge no source. It's a modern translation into Gaelic, of course, and I do hope not calculated to deceive. Mind you, Any Old Iron is described in the DT as "Irish". Perhaps we can look forward to the "lost, ancient" Irish Gaelic text of that, too, before long.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 07:30 PM

May have been reported before, but a Gaelic Ponchartrain - "Bruach Loch Ponchartrain" at bruach L Ponchartrain
Note: Alligator not translated.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 09:06 AM

...the well-known Yorkshireman. One set of Ponchartrain appears in Sam Henry's Songs of the People; but that was noted from a singer who had learned it in America. Beside the modern Planxty/Brady connection, I'd guess that the main reason why people often think it's an Irish song is that it's often sung to the tune also used for Lily of the West; but the book is still open on whether that song started in Ireland or England, anyway. The tune was earlier used for Caroline of Edinburgh Town (under which name the tune was prescribed on broadside sets of Lily published in the USA) and would be either Irish or Scottish in origin; at the moment I'm inclined to the latter.

We do have quite a few Ponchartrain threads, in which much of the same information (including what I've just said) tends to get posted.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 04:01 AM

Christy, in his book, says he learned it from Mike Waterson.

Regards


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Bill Kennedy
Date: 28 Jan 03 - 10:06 AM

Paul Brady, mentioned above, says in his introduction to the song on his 'Missing Liberty Tapes' cd, 'Here's a song I learned from the singing of Christy Moore.' Paul did give it a wider popularity, however.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: alanabit
Date: 28 Jan 03 - 03:58 AM

What, has nobody yet mentioned Mudcat's own Jed Marum's lovely version on "Soul of a Wanderer"? Here's another great version to cheer the hearts of old folkies.


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Subject: ADD: The Banks of the Similkameen
From: Jon Bartlett
Date: 28 Jan 03 - 03:41 AM

Could have sworn I sent this in years ago. It's from the Phil Thomas collection and in his Songs of the Pacific Northwest. The places are along the US/Canada border in the Okanagan/Okanogan country.

The Banks of the Similkameen

It was one Sunday morning I bid Grand Forks adieu
To beat my way to Oroville, a place that once I knew
Over ties and railway crossings I beat my weary way
Until I met a maiden at the close of one hot day.

Well, good eve, good eve, fair maiden, my money does me no good
If it hadn't a been for the coyotes, I'd a stayed out in the woods.
You're welcome, welcome stranger, although our home is plain
We never have turned a stranger out on the banks of the Similkameen.

She took me to her mother's house and treated me quite well
Her hair in dark brown ringlets about her shoulders fell
I tried to paint her beauty but true it was in vain
For perfect was the Orovoille girl on the banks of the Similkameen.

I asked her to marry me, she said it ne'er could be
She said she had a lover and he lived in BC
She said she had a lover and true she would remain
Until her came to claim her on the banks of the Similkameen.

So adieu, adieu, fair maiden, I never shall see no more
I'll never forget your kindness nor the cottage by the shore
Adieu, adieu, fair maiden, we'll drink to the flowing stream
We'll drink a health to the Oroville girl on the banks of the Similkameen.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Gwonya
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 11:19 PM

Peter Case plays and sings this song very well.
Catch him whenever you can.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 08:25 PM

From booklet (p. 37) to The Complete Hank Williams [10-CD edition] (Mercury, 1998):

"Fly Trouble" was released alongside one of Hank's most affecting ballads, "On the Banks of the Old Pontchartrain." Hank was weak at writing narrative verse, but he had acquired a poem from a woman in Louisiana, Kathleen Ramona Vincent, and set it to a very traditional-sounding melody. The result harked back to the origins of country music and was quite unlike anything else he ever commercially recorded. Rose's slick novelty ["Fly Trouble"] and the folk ballad were released together and became Hank's worst-selling single. In years to come, when someone would remark how well one of his records was selling, he would say, "Sure, am glad it ain't another damn 'Pontchartrain'.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Amos
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 07:57 PM

Thanks for the reminder, Masato!! I knew it was somewhere in that period. What woudl we do without you!


A


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 07:18 PM

GUEST,Q, I noticed the missing verses. But they were also written by Hank Williams ans Ramona Vincent, and are contained in Hank Williams Country Music Folio (Acuff-Rose) [songbook], and in Don Cusic's Hank Williams: The Complete Lyrics (St. Martin's Press, 1993).


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 06:49 PM

Masato, could well be by Hank Williams Sr. and Ramona Vincent (possibly in 1947-1948).
The version sung by Mrs. Apple has two verses missing in the lyrics posted on the Williams site. The ones starting "I ventured a smile," and "As time drifted by..."

Authors and guitar chords at Banks of Old
(in case my link is bad- http://www.thetabworld.com/H...onchartrain_guitar_chord_27593/showtab.jsp


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 06:46 PM

'On The Banks Of The Old Pontchartrain' - Hank Williams [Real Audio] from The Record Lady's All-Time Country Favorites (Real Country Archives Page 8).

Written by Hank Williams & Ramona Vincent, copyrighted 1948.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 06:06 PM

"On the Banks of the Old Ponchartrain" is a Hank Williams, Sr. song.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: mooman
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 05:13 PM

The Be Good Tanyas' is actually now my favourite version of this particular song, which is somewhat special to me as the Planxty version was our favourite during our courting period.

moo


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: TIA
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 04:25 PM

Really nice very recent version (albeit with mumbled vocals) by the Be Good Tonyas on the album Blue Horse (I think).


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 04:15 PM

There are a number of variants, none dated except for recording dates. "The Ponsaw Train," in Randolph, Ozark Folksongs, No. 882, was "learned about 1898," and collected in Missouri in 1922. Randolph says "The Lakes of Ponchartrain" was "reported from the Middle West by Tolman and Eddy (JAFL, 35, 1922) and by Pound (American Ballads and Songs, 1922)." The title "Creole Girl" appeared in "Folklore from Iowa," by Stout, 1936.
The western version "On the Lake of the Poncho Plains" (in a thread somewhere) was first recorded by Margaret Larkin in "The Singing Cowboy," 1931, and probably is 20th century.
Everyone seems to agree on a 19th century origin for the song, but the chronology is uncertain.
Some authors relate this song to "Lily of the West," but that may be coincidental.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 03:44 PM

Loqui, from the excellent Wolf Collection of Ozark folk songs. Wolf Collection
It adds much to the Max Hunter Collection.


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Amos
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 03:39 PM

"On the Banks...." is a very different song, and was coined in the mid 1900's if I recall correctly, or later, while the earlier "Lakes of Pontchartrain" dates from almost a century earlier. I could well be wrong about the earlier one, it is just a guess. But they really aren't cognates except that some fairly modern S/SW decided to write soemthing using a similar concept.

A


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 03:38 PM

Other threads: 21105, 46071.
Ponchartrain
Ponchartrain


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Loqui
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 03:38 PM

Where did this come from I'm listening to the Deanta version right now


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: MartinRyan
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 03:38 PM

Interesting version alright.

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add:
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 27 Jan 03 - 03:34 PM

There are four versions of Lakes of Ponchartrain in the DT and another above, but this one doesn't mention alligators and has other differences.

Lyr. Add: ON THE BANKS OF THE OLD PONCHARTRAIN

I traveled from Texas to low Louisian',
Through valleys, o'er mountains and plain.
Both footsore and weary, I rested a while
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

The fairest young maiden that I ever saw
Passed by as it started to rain.
We both found shelter beneath the same tree
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

I ventured a smile, but she thought I was bold.
I hastened to try and explain,
But somehow I knew I would linger a while
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

We hid from the shower an hour or so.
She asked me how long I'd remain.
I told her I'd spend the rest of my life
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

As time drifted by, we fell deeper in love,
A love that could just bring her pain.
I knew that one day I would leave her alone
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

I just couldn't tell her that I ran away
From jail on an old Texas plain.
I prayed in my heart I would never be found
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

Then one day a man put his hand on my arm
And said I must go west again.
I left her alone without saying goodbye,
On the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

Tonight as I sit here alone in my cell,
I know that she's waiting in vain.
I'm hoping and praying someday to return
To the banks of the Old Ponchartrain.

Sung by Mrs. W. B. Apple, recorded 1962, learned from Lolly Linebarger. Wolf Folklore Collection (Lyon College, Batesville, AR): Ponchartrain

Another version is in the collection, titled "Creole Girl," recorded 1958. Creole Girl


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Subject: RE: The Lakes of Ponchartrain
From: Jon Whitney
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 07:25 PM

Planxty does this song on their "Cold Blow and the Rainy Night" CD. The liner notes indicate it may be from a British source dating to the war of 1812, when the British fought the Americans in New Orleans, among other places.


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