Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesonny

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Origins: Admiral Benbow

DigiTrad:
ADMIRAL BENBOW
ADMIRAL BENBOW (2)


Related threads:
Folklore: Brave Benbow (29)
happy? - Aug 14 (Death of Benbow) (2)
Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (7)


Les from Hull 13 Sep 17 - 09:37 AM
Steve Gardham 11 Sep 17 - 11:15 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Sep 17 - 11:13 AM
r.padgett 10 Sep 17 - 03:09 AM
Nigel Parsons 09 Sep 17 - 06:47 PM
r.padgett 15 Jul 17 - 02:51 AM
GUEST,Guest: Dave Arthur 14 Jul 17 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,Don Wise 02 Dec 11 - 10:25 AM
MGM·Lion 02 Dec 11 - 12:19 AM
MGM·Lion 02 Dec 11 - 12:16 AM
Rumncoke 02 Oct 09 - 03:50 PM
Anglo 02 Oct 09 - 02:15 AM
GUEST,Fred Fnord 01 Oct 09 - 06:40 PM
Jim Dixon 07 May 09 - 08:35 AM
GUEST,Jim P 06 May 09 - 03:28 AM
NormanD 05 May 09 - 02:22 PM
NormanD 05 May 09 - 10:03 AM
Sailor Ron 05 May 09 - 06:54 AM
Artful Codger 05 May 09 - 05:56 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 29 Mar 08 - 05:51 PM
GUEST,Raymond Davies (raymonddavies1@comcast.net 03 Jun 05 - 03:50 PM
Fliss 13 Dec 04 - 02:48 AM
GUEST,Exbluebeller 12 Dec 04 - 02:11 PM
GUEST,Santa 19 Dec 03 - 04:53 AM
Roberto 19 Dec 03 - 02:40 AM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Dec 03 - 07:43 PM
GUEST,Joseph Miras 18 Dec 03 - 06:46 PM
GUEST,bpbenbow@hotmail.com 26 Nov 02 - 05:36 PM
GUEST,Claymore 11 Oct 02 - 12:12 PM
Troll 10 Oct 02 - 11:03 PM
GUEST 08 Oct 02 - 02:11 PM
GUEST 08 Oct 02 - 01:41 PM
Schantieman 08 Oct 02 - 11:43 AM
Schantieman 08 Oct 02 - 11:41 AM
sian, west wales 08 Oct 02 - 05:37 AM
Malcolm Douglas 07 Oct 02 - 11:07 AM
Schantieman 07 Oct 02 - 07:24 AM
GUEST,Jon 07 Oct 02 - 02:59 AM
Malcolm Douglas 07 Oct 02 - 02:01 AM
Joe Offer 06 Oct 02 - 10:16 PM
Joe Offer 06 Oct 02 - 09:59 PM
GUEST,Andy Barnes 06 Oct 02 - 07:54 PM
greg stephens 12 Jul 02 - 01:06 PM
Charley Noble 12 Jul 02 - 08:41 AM
greg stephens 12 Jul 02 - 06:09 AM
Wolfgang 12 Jul 02 - 06:04 AM
Charley Noble 11 Jul 02 - 08:50 PM
vectis 11 Jul 02 - 06:52 PM
The Walrus at work 11 Jul 02 - 08:56 AM
Charley Noble 10 Jul 02 - 08:02 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: Origins: Admiral Benbow
From: Les from Hull
Date: 13 Sep 17 - 09:37 AM

Just to clear up any confusion:

HIS Ruby was a 40gun fourth rate ship built in 1651 at Deptford. She was one of the ships in Benbow's squadron at the Action of August 1702.

Vice-Admiral John Benbow's popularity was often supposed to be because he was not of the traditional officer class of the Royal Navy. He had served as Master's Mate and in the Merchant Navy before his eventual commission in the Navy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Admiral Benbow
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 11 Sep 17 - 11:15 AM

The fact that both Jack Hall and Benbow both share the same form and tune which is somewhat older than the events (c1702) suggests to me that both were written just after the events and used the tune which still survives in traditional versions. A remarkable survival. We have no way of knowing when in the 18thc the other Benbow was written, although written in the 1st person it could be contemporary.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Admiral Benbow
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Sep 17 - 11:13 AM

Thanks for combining, Joe.
There are minor differences in the words, as noted above. Using till instead of 'til is probably down to personal preference. But the line (above) "The Ruby and Benbow fought the French" Is somewhat clearer than the one in DT which has "Then Ruby and Benbow fought the French". The latter would seem to make Ruby a person as listed with Benbow. If (as with Benbow) you take the captains name it would be "Then Walton and Benbow fought the French". The only thing that give a hint that we are talking about the name of a ship, rather than the name of the captain is that in Sharp's version it's "The Ruby".
The tunes in the two sources seem completely different.

Cheers
Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Admiral Benbow
From: r.padgett
Date: 10 Sep 17 - 03:09 AM

I have been singing above version for some years! It was a favourite for group singing too!

Tune was/is Captain Kidd

Ray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: Admiral Benbow (from Cecil J Sharp)
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Sep 17 - 06:47 PM

ADMIRAL BENBOW
Collected and arranged by Cecil J Sharp

Come all ye seamen bold, and draw near, and draw near.
Come all ye seamen bold, and draw near.
It's of an admiral's fame, O brave Benbow was his name
How he fought all on the main, you shall hear, you shall hear.
Brave Benbow he set sail, for to fight, for to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail, for to fight.
Brave Benbow he set sail, with a fine and pleasant gale
But his Captains they turned tail, In a fright, in a fright.

Says Kirby unto Wade, "we will run, we will run."
Says Kirby unto Wade, "we will run.
For I value no disgrace, nor the losing of my place,
But the enemy I won't face, nor his guns, nor his guns."
The Ruby and Benbow fought the French, fought the French,
The Ruby and Benbow fought the French.
They fought them up and down, till the blood came trickling down
'Til the blood came trickling down, where they lay, where they lay.

Brave Benbow lost his legs by chain shot, by chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs by chain shot.
Brave Benbow lost his legs, and all on his stumps he begs
Fight on, my English lads, 'tis our lot, 'tis our lot.
The surgeon dressed his wounds, cries Benbow, Cries Benbow,
The surgeon dressed his wounds, cries Benbow.
"Let a cradle now in haste on the quarterdeck be placed,
That the enemy I may face till I die, till I die.


X: 1
T: Admiral Benbow (Sharp)
M: 2/2
L: 1/4
Z: NP 09/09/2017
K: G
z3 D| GGAF| G2Bc| d2cB| (AcB)A| GGAF| (GD)EE| E3c| BABc| d2cB| AGFE| D2DD| GGGE| C2B,C| D2EF| G2zD| GGAF| G2Bc|d2cB| (AcB)A|GGAF| (GD)EE| D3c|BABc|d2cB| AGFE| D2DD| GGGE| C2B,C|D2EF|G3z|
w: Come all ye sea-men bold, and draw near, and draw near__ Come all ye sea-men bold,_ and draw near. It's of an ad-miral's fame, O brave Ben-bow was his name, How he fought all on the main, you shall hear, you shall hear. Brave Ben-bow he set sail, for to fight, for to fight__ Brave Ben-bow he set sail,_ for to fight. Brave Ben-bow he set sail, with a fine and plea-sant gale But his Cap-tains they turned tail, in a fright, in a fright.

From: A Selection of Collected Folk Songs arranged by Cecil J Sharp and R Vaughan Williams
Published by Novello & Co (Undated)
Added despite there already being a couple of versions in the DT. Slight variations in the words ('till' instead on ''til' hardly seems worth correcting) but "The Ruby and Benbow fought the French" seems clearer than "Then Ruby and Benbow fought the French", making it clearer that 'The Ruby' is a ship, not another captain.
Also the tune appears to be different, particularly as it spans two verses.
Mine not to decide what's worthy of inclusion. Just spend the time typing & see!
NP

Note from Joe Offer: the lyrics exactly match the first version we have in the Digital Tradition. I didn't check to see if the tunes match.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: r.padgett
Date: 15 Jul 17 - 02:51 AM

The story of course is a bit hit and miss and there are Wikis for the encounter and Benbow's life story

Frankly I would have agreed with Kirby and Wade and left the battle (and got hanged) to fight when the odds and conditions were better ~

The French captain seems to have some sway also ~ Benbow had chain shot round one leg! he did not die straight after the battle in Port Royal ~ the Oral tradition and making things fit the song took over it seems!

Ray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: GUEST,Guest: Dave Arthur
Date: 14 Jul 17 - 01:24 PM

As far as I know our 1969 Topic recording of Admiral Benbow (We sailed to Virginia and thence to Fayal) was the first recorded version of the song. Predating the Swan Arcade recording by about four years. June Tabor's Topic track on A Cut Above came out eleven years later in 1980. Louis Killen's was also considerably later. Of the several other recordings of the songs none, it seems pre-date 1969. Toni and I had been singing the song from about 1967 before recording it for Topic.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: GUEST,Don Wise
Date: 02 Dec 11 - 10:25 AM

"We sailed to Virginia and thence to Fayal...."

was also recorded by Dave & Toni Arthur,"The Lark in the Morning",Topic 12T190.
From the sleeve notes: 'the version sung here is from Chappell's "Old English Popular Music".....The tune is a variant of 'Love Will Find Out The Way', first published in 1651..........Chappell collected it from hop-pickers in the mid nineteenth century, and Lucy Broadwood found it in Sussex in 1898.

Glad to be of service!

Don


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 02 Dec 11 - 12:19 AM

Sorry ~ we have that one here. I meant that for the other thread ongoing, where I have now posted it.

~M~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 02 Dec 11 - 12:16 AM

There is also the other Admiral Benbow song: other that is than the two with the "Sam Hall, chimney-sweep"-type chorus which are in DT, which begins "We sailed from Virginia & thence to Fayal, Where we watered our shipping and the we weighed all"; not another version, but a different song about the same man (Roud 227). It is in the Copper Family songbook, it appears, according to one note on the Google index:
"Admiral Benbow Song
bravebenbow.tripod.com/id19.html
Printed in The Copper Family Songbook - A Living Tradition. ADMIRAL BENBOW (4). We sailed from Virginia and thence to Fayall Where we watered our ships ..."

~Michael~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: Rumncoke
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 03:50 PM

I believe that the Ruby was a sloop of war, a vessel smaller than a frigate, with lighter and/or fewer guns and built for speed rather than battling broadside to broadside.

The definition of sloop has certainly altered over the centuries, and the modern sloops are a design from the Caribbean islands.

Anne Croucher


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: Anglo
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 02:15 AM

Apologies for not going carefully through the while thread, where this might have been discussed, but I always wondered about the "brigantine sloop" as well, and when I did sing it, substituted "brig and a sloop." However, I have since discovered that "sloop" in RN terms was not descriptive of rigging, but of the vessel's naval function (as a support vessel, I believe, though I am not certain of the exact definition). So I went back to singing it the other way.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: GUEST,Fred Fnord
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 06:40 PM

> The first we came up with, was a brig and a sloop.

Ah hah! I always wondered about that 'brigantine sloop'. A brigantine is either a smallish boat with two masts, or a way of rigging a boat that has with two masts. A sloop only has one mast.

--fred


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE DEATH OF ADMIRAL BENBOW
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 May 09 - 08:35 AM

From Salopian Shreds and Patches, Vol. 8, 1888, page 249:

"The following song appears at page 275 of an old song book called "The Songster's Favourite Companion," A collection of new and much-esteemed songs, adapted for the Flute, Voice, and Violin. Glasgow: Printed for A. Macgoun, Music-seller, by Oliver and Co., Printers, Edinr. [1810.] Illustrated by Bewick, and having musical headings to the first verse of each song."


THE DEATH OF ADMIRAL BENBOW

O we sailed to Virginia, and thence to Fayal,
Where we water'd our shipping, and so then weigh'd all;
Full in view on the seas, boys, seven sail we did espy!
О we mann-ed our capstern and weigh'd spee-di-ly.

The first we came up with, was a brig and a sloop,
We ask'd if the other five were as big as they look'd;
But turning to windward, as near as we could lie,
We found they were French men of war cruising hard by.

О we drew up our squadron in a very nice line,
And fought them courageous for four hours' time;
But the day being spent, boys, and night coming on,
We let them alone till the very next morn.

The very next morning, the engagement prov'd hot,
And brave Admiral Benbow receiv'd a chain-shot.
О when he was wounded, to his merry men he did say,
Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away.

О the guns they did rattle, and the bullets did fly,
While brave Admiral Benbow for help loud did cry;
Carry me down to the cockpit, there is ease for my smarts;
If my merry men should see me, 'twill sure break all their hearts.

The very next morning, at break of the day,
We hoisted our topsails, and so bore away;
We bore down to Port Royal, where the people flock'd much,
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Town Church.

Come all ye brave fellows, wheresoever you have been,
Let us drink a good health to our King and our queen,
Another good health, boys, to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance of brave Admiral Вenbow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: GUEST,Jim P
Date: 06 May 09 - 03:28 AM

In addition to the sources mentioned above, the Sons of the Buccaneer's CD of the same name, contains Benbow, sung (very well) by Jim Nelson in an up-beat manner. The SOB's were a local (SF Bay Area) group, and I wouldn't be surprised if they were not well known elsewhere, even though they deserved to be. I think they've disbanded, although the individual members continue to be active locally. Jim Nelson often shows up at the Starry Plow's Irish jam on Sunday nights. If anyone wants to hear his version (and its well worth hearing) I bet he'd be happy to comply.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: NormanD
Date: 05 May 09 - 02:22 PM

Sorry, some of the post has already been quoted (though not all of it, and it was 7 years ago).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: NormanD
Date: 05 May 09 - 10:03 AM

I recently came across the following piece in George Orwell's writings for Tribune magazine. Please excuse the length - the following quote is from Orwell himself! His end comment about the song's then unavailability still seems to apply - I couldn't find a version on YouTube, for example.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

"As I Please" Tribune, 29 December 1944

The English common people are not great lovers of military glory, and I have pointed out elsewhere that when a battle poem wins really wide popularity, it usually deals with a disaster and not a victory. But the other day, when I repeated this in some connexion, there came into my head the once popular song – it might be popular again if one of the gramophone companies would bother to record it – 'Admiral Benbow'. This rather jingoistic ballad seems to contradict my theory, but I believe it may have owed some of its popularity to the fact that it had a class-war angle which was understood at the time.

Admiral Benbow, when going into action against the French, was suddenly deserted by his subordinate captains and left to fight against heavy odds. As the ballad puts it:

Said Kirby unto Wade, 'We will run, we will run,'
Said Kirby unto Wade, 'We will run;
For I value no disgrace
Nor the losing of my place,
But the enemy I won't face,
Nor his guns, nor his guns.'

So Benbow was left to fight single-handed and, though victorious, he himself was killed. There is a gory but possibly authentic description of his death:

Brave Benbow lost his legs, by chain shot, by chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs, by chain shot;
Brave Benbow lost his legs
And all on his stumps he begs,
'Fight on, my English lads,
'tis our lot, 'tis our lot.'

The surgeon dressed his wounds, Benbow cries, Benbow cries,
The surgeon dressed his wounds, Benbow cries;
'Let a cradle now in haste
On the quarter-deck be placed,
That the enemy I may face Till I die, till I die.'

The point is that Benbow was an ordinary seaman who had risen from the ranks. He had started off as a cabin boy. And his captains are supposed to have fled from the action because they did not want to see so plebeian a commander win a victory. I wonder whether it was this tradition that made Benbow into a popular hero and caused his name to be commemorated not only in the ballad but on the signs of innumerable public houses?

I believe no recording of this song exists, but – as I discovered when I was broadcasting and wanted to use similar pieces as five-minute fill-ups – it is only one of a long list of old popular songs and folk songs which have not been recorded. Until recently, at any rate, I believe there was not even a record of 'Tom Bowling' or of 'Greensleeves', i.e. the words as well as the music. Others that I failed to get hold of were 'A cottage well thatched with straw', 'Green grow the rushes, O', 'Blow away the morning dew', and 'Come lasses and lads'. Other well-known songs are recorded in mutilated versions, and usually sung by professional singers with such a stale perfunctoriness that you seem to smell the whisky and cigarette smoke coming off the record. The collection of recorded carols is also very poor. You can't, I believe, get hold of 'Minstrels and maid', or 'Like silver lamps in a distant shrine', or 'Dives and Lazarus', or other old favourites. On the other hand, if you want a record of 'Roll out the barrel', 'Boomps-a-daisy', etc., you would find quite a number of different renderings to choose from.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 05 May 09 - 06:54 AM

The line '... brigantine sloop' does not make sence, as there is no such rig. I would suggest it should be "...a brig AND a sloop2.
Incidentally, the French Admiral De Grasse sent a message to Kingston offering to give evidence against Kirby, Wade & co at the courts martial. Ron


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow (from June Tabor)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 05 May 09 - 05:56 AM

There is a version in Frank Kidson and Martin Shaw's Songs of Britain (1913), with tune. The text on cursory examination seems very close to June Tabor's version. I don't know whether the tune is the same as Tabor, Killen or the Coppers use, not having heard any of them. A scan of the book is available at Google Books (pp. 60-61, PDF pp. 79-80).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: Admiral Benbow (from Bodleian)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 29 Mar 08 - 05:51 PM

Malcolm linked a copy in the Bodleian Library which essentially is the one by Tabor, but differs in details. Fayall is not mentioned as a destination.

ADMIRAL BENBOW
(Printed for W. Armstrong, Liverpool, 1820-1824)

O we sail'd to Virginia, and thence to New York,
Where we water'd our shipping and so weigh'd for Cork,
Full in view on the seas, seven sail we did spy,
O we manned our capstern and weigh'd speedily.
2
The first two we came up with were brigantine sloops,
We ask'd were those five others as big as they look'd,
But turning to windward as near as we could lie,
We found them Frenchmen of war cruising hard by.
3
We took our leave of them, and made quick dispatch,
And we steer'd our course to the island of Vache,
But turning to windward, as near as we could lie,
On the fourteenth of August ten sail we did spy.
4
They hoisted their pendants, their colours they spread,
And they hoisted their bloody flag on main top-mast-head,
Then we hoisted the Jack flag at our mizen peak,
And soon formed the line, tho' our squadron was weak.
5
The very next morning, the engagement was hot,
When brave Admiral Benbow, receiv'd a chain shot,
O when he was wounded to his men he did say,
Take me up in your arms, boys, and bear me away.
6
O the guns they did rattle, and the bullets did fly,
While brave Admiral Benbow for help loud did cry,
Tp the cockpit convey me and soon ease my smart,
Should my brave fellows see me, 'twould soon break their heart.
7
And there Captain Kirby prov'd coward at last,
And with Wade play'd at bopeep behind the main mast,
O there did they stand and quiver and shake,
Lest those French dogs should conquer and their lives they
   should take.
8
The very next morning, at break of the day,
We hoisted our topsails and so bore away,
We bore to Port Royal where the people flock'd much,
To see Admiral Benbow brought to Kingston church.
9
Come all you brave fellows wherever you've been,
Let us drink a health to great George and his Queen,
And another good health to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance of Admiral Benbow.

Harding B28(261), 1820-1824, Printed for W. Armstrong, Bannastre Steeet (Liverpool).
Bodleian Library.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,Raymond Davies (raymonddavies1@comcast.net
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 03:50 PM

When I was in the Alpha class at Chichester High School for Boys (West Sussex) in 1941, our music teacher was a Mr Bimrose. We called him 'Bimbo' and I remember these words sung to the tune downloaded.

And Benbow lost his legs, in the fight, in the fight.
And Benbow lost his legs in the fight.
Benbow lost his legs (and then, possibly) "and they brought them home in kegs
They brought them (or him) home in kegs", in the fight, in the fight.

Pursuant to the custom of bringing back remains in rum (as they did Admiral Lord Nelson and described on the tour of the Victory in Portsmouth (my birthplace) the reference to the kegs is possible.

When singing the song, we naturally substituted 'Bimbo' for "Benbow" which is why I remember it so well. Thank you for the site.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Fliss
Date: 13 Dec 04 - 02:48 AM

I come from Shrewsbury and there is an Admiral Benbow pub in the town much beloved of bikers in the 70s.

Until recently the site of the house Benbow lived in as a lad on Coton Hill was occupied by a local car firm. The key that Benbow left on a tree, when he ran away to sea, is in a case by the showroom.

The town's modern (1960s monstrosity) market hall has a tower and clock which is named Benbow.

fliss


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,Exbluebeller
Date: 12 Dec 04 - 02:11 PM

In the 60's Mick Waterson was singing a version beginning "We sailed to Carthaginia (Cartagena?) and thence to Fayal, where we watered our ship me boys and then we sailed on" This makes better geographic sense than "Virginia" and surely predates the Tabor/Swan Arcade version.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,Santa
Date: 19 Dec 03 - 04:53 AM

Brave Admiral Benbow was also recorded by Strawhead on their first LP (Musket, Pike and Drum, 1977?), and sung by them ever since.

I don't know how this fits with the Swan Arcade story, if at all.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: ADMIRAL BENBOW
From: Roberto
Date: 19 Dec 03 - 02:40 AM

Two versions, four recordings. The first version, as recorded by Louis Killen and June Tabor; the second, as recorded by Bob Copper and Paul Clayton. Hope there are not mistakes in the transcriptions. Roberto

ADMIRAL BENBOW (I)


a) Brave Admiral Benbow
Louis Killen, Sailors, Ships & Chanteys, Vol.2, A Seaman's Garland, Knock Out KO04, 1997

Oh, we sailed to Virginia and thence to Fayall
Where we watered our ship in and then weighed all
Then in view on the seas, boys, seven sails we did espy
Oh, we mannéd our capstan and weighed speedily

The first we come up with was a brigantine sloop
And we asked if the others were as big as they looked
Then turning to windward as near as we could lie
We found there was ten men of war cruising there by

Oh, we drew up our squadron in a very nice line
And boldly we fought them for full four hours time
Then the day being spent, boys, and the night coming on
We left them alone till the very next morn

The very next morning the engagement proved hot
And brave Admiral Benbow received a chain shot
And when he was wounded to his men he did say:
Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away

Oh, the guns they did rattle and the bullets did fly
But Admiral Benbow for help would not cry:
Take me down to the cockpit, there is ease for my smarts
If my merry men see me, it would sure break their hearts

And there Captain Kirby proved a coward at last
And with Wade played at bopeep behind the main-mast
And there they did stand, boys, and shiver and shake
For fear that those French dogs their lives they should take

The very next morning at the break of the day
They hoisted their tops'ls and so bore away
We bore up for Port Royal, where the people flocked much
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church

Come all you brave fellows, wherever you be
And drink to the health of our King and our Queen
And another good health to the girls that we know
And a third in remembrance of brave Admiral Benbow

Oh, yes, drink up a health, boys, to the girls we do know
And a third for remembrance of brave Admiral Benbow



b) Admiral Benbow
June Tabor, A Cut Above, with Martin Simpson, Topic TSCD 410, 1989

We sailed from Virginia and thence to Fayall
Where we watered our ship and then we weighed all
Full in view on the seas, boys, seven sails we did espy,
We mannéd our capstans and weighed speedily.

Now the first we come up on was a brigantine sloop
And we asked if the others was as big as they looked
Ah, but turning to windward, as near as we could lie
We saw there were ten men of war cruising by.

We drew up our squadron in very nice line
And boldly we fought them for full four hours time
But the day being spent, boys, and the night a-coming on
We left them alone till the early next morn.

Now the very next morning the engagement proved hot
And brave Admiral Benbow received a chain shot
And as he was wounded to his merry men he did say,
"Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away!"

Oh, the guns they did rattle and the bullets did fly,
But brave Admiral Benbow for rout would not cry;
"Take me down to the cabin where there's ease for my smarts,
If my merry men see me, it would sure break their hearts."

Now, the very next morning by break of the day
They hoisted their topsails and so bore away;
We bore to Port Royal, where the people flocked much
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church.

Come all you brave fellows, wherever you've been,
Let us drink to the health of our King and our Queen,
And another good health to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance of great Admiral Benbow.



ADMIRAL BENBOW (II)


a) Admiral Benbow
Bob Copper, Copperfulofsongs, Folktrax FTX-238, recorded 1963-1983, edited by Peter Kennedy and first published on Folktrax cassettes 1983

Come all you seamen bold, landed here, landed here
It is of an Admiral brave called Benbow by his name
How he ploughed the raging main
You shall hear, you shall hear

Last Tuesday morning last, Benbow sailed, Benbow sailed
What a sweet and pleasant gale when Benbow he set sail
And the enemy they turned tail
In a fright, in a fright

Great Reuben and Benbow fought the French, fought the French
See the boats go up and down and the bullets whizzing round
And the enemy they knocked down
There they lay, there they lay

Oh, Benbow lost his legs, by chain-shot, by chain-shot
Down on his stumps did fall and so loud for mercy called.
Oh, fight on my British tars
It is my lot, it is my lot.

When the doctor dressed his wounds Benbow cried, Benbow cried
Oh, pray pick me up in haste to the quarter deck my place
That the enemy I might face
Until I die, until I die.

Last Tuesday morning last, Benbow died, Benbow died
What a shocking sight to see when they carried him away
Oh, they carried him to Se'm's'on church
There he lays, there he lays.



b) Admiral Benbow
Paul Clayton, & Sailing Songs, Tradition TCD 1064 (original LP release: Whaling & Sailing Songs from the days of Moby Dick, Tradition Records TLP 1005, 1956)

'T was of an Admiral
Called Benbow by his name
He fought on the raging main
You must know
Oh, the ship rocks up and down
And the shots are flying round
The enemy tumbling down
There they lay, there they lay

The ship rocks up and down
And the shots are flying round
The enemy tumbling down
There they lay, there they lay

'T was Reuben and Benbow
Fought the French, fought the French
'T was Reuben and Benbow
Fought the French, fought the French
Down on his old stump he fell
And so loudly he did call
Fight you on, my English lads
'Tis my lot, 'tis my lot

Down on his old stump he fell
And so loudly he did call
Fight you on, my English lads
'Tis my lot, 'tis my lot

When the doctor dressed his wounds
Benbow cried, Benbow cried
When the doctor dressed his wounds
Benbow cried,
Let a bed be fetched in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed
That the enemy I might face
'Til I die, 'til I die

Let a bed be fetched in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed,
That the enemy I might face
'Til I die, 'til I die

On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died, Benbow died
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died
What a shocking sight to see
When Benbow was carried away
He was carried to Kingston church
There he lay, there he lay

What a shocking sight to see
When Benbow was carried away
He was carried to Kingston church
There he lay, there he lay

    Note from Joe Offer: If at all possible, please put only one song in a message. It makes indexing a lot easier. Thanks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Dec 03 - 07:43 PM

Admiral Benbow was a national hero, and plenty of real pubs were named after him as well as fictional ones. I don't find that surprising at all. Stevenson published Treasure Island in 1883, some 180 years after Benbow's death. The songs are at the very least a century older than the novel. There is plenty of information earlier in this thread; though, as is inevitably the way with combined threads, that information may not appear in the most helpful order.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,Joseph Miras
Date: 18 Dec 03 - 06:46 PM

It surprises me that the name of the ballad
is the same name RLS gave to the inn at the
very start of Treasure Island. Was the ballad
written before the novel, was it the other way
round? I should know that since I am a devoted
reader of the great Scot.

Greetings


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,bpbenbow@hotmail.com
Date: 26 Nov 02 - 05:36 PM

Caryl Brahms and Ned Sherrin published a book version of their TV play titled Benbow was his Name in 1967, Hutchinson & Co publishers, London. I have written a more accurate biography titled Brave Benbow which is available by contacting me at bpbenbow@hotmail.com.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 11 Oct 02 - 12:12 PM

My maternal grandmother was an English woman from Cornwall, whose maiden name was Benbow (direct from the Admiral), and married a Scotsman named Glasson, coming to America in the early 1900s in time to get wiped out, though not killed, by the San Fransico Earthquake. She was one of the last to carry that name until marriage.

My mothers middle name was Benbow, a fact that is frequently used by credit card companies to verify my records. Yet with only slight reference to the past, I knew nothing about the man. Thank you all for contributing to this thread


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Troll
Date: 10 Oct 02 - 11:03 PM

Here at Disney Sea in Tokyo, one of the piped-in tunes on the "Cape Cod Waterfront" is the Swan Arcade/June Tabor version of "Admiral Benbow".
It is likely that Tabor learned the song from Dave and Heather Brady of Swan Arcade as they live fairly close to each other in Northern England. Swan Arcade recorded the song in the last 60's or early 70's I believe.

troll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Oct 02 - 02:11 PM

I think I must have misscopied the tune above, and that C in the 2nd measure should be sharp. It's still a very uncommon mode.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Tune Add: ADMIRAL BENBOW [WE SAILED TO VIRGINIA]
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Oct 02 - 01:41 PM

Correcting my error above-


Wm. Chappell in PMOT give a 3/4 time major mode tune for the "We
sailed for Virginia" one, but I don't know where he got it.
The song and tune were given in 'The Vocal Enchantress', 1783,
with the tune as follows:



X:1

T:ADMIRAL BENBOW [WE SAILED TO VIRGINIA]

S:Vocal Enchantress, 1783

Q:1/4=120

L:1/4

M:C|

K:Ddor

A/|dd(^c/d/) (e/c/)|A2FA|c2Ae|g3(f/e/)|f(e/d/) (^c/d/) e/c/|\

A2FA|d3||(d/e/)|ffaa|g2(fe)|g (e/d/) (g/f/) (e/d/)|\

{d/}^c2zG|Adeg|f2 (f/d/) (d/^c/)|d2A^c|d3"Chorus"G|\

Adfg|f2 (f/e/) (d/^c/)|d2A^c|d3|]




Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Schantieman
Date: 08 Oct 02 - 11:43 AM

Ah - sorry - the clicky doesn't quite make it. I think Malcolm Douglas's one above has it right! Thanks Malcom.

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Schantieman
Date: 08 Oct 02 - 11:41 AM

Just found the Bodleian Library broadside here but I'm not sure if it's the one I had originally!

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: sian, west wales
Date: 08 Oct 02 - 05:37 AM

I was recently trying to find information on the Welsh tune, Mentra Gwen, for a friend - a bit complicated as Mentra Gwen is today known as one specific folk song but the tune was widely used in previous centuries for a variety of texts. Anyway, it's the same metre as Admiral Benbow (the "Come All Ye" above) and the 'digging' took me through "Ye Jacobites by Name", "The Loyall Subject's Joy", "Sam Hall", "Jack Hall", as well as "Admiral B.". "The Loyall Subject's Joy" I found here (will this "Make a link" thing work?) and it led me to "Sound a Charge" which I found at JC's ABC Tune Finder (B438, B439)

As it happens, the search also came up with "What Wondrous Love is This" (found in Southern Harmony), but although the metre is right, the tune probably isn't related, according to my friend.

Wandering a bit from Benbow perhaps, but it might be useful to someone...

sian



Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 07 Oct 02 - 11:07 AM

There are two examples there of the "Virginia" song. See my earlier link to the Armstrong of Liverpool edition, and another, which I didn't spot first time round:

On admiral Bembo's death in the West-Indies Printed between 1790 and 1840 by J. Jennings, No. 13, Water-lane, Fleet- street, London (better of two copies).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Schantieman
Date: 07 Oct 02 - 07:24 AM

Tundra (Doug & Sue Hudson) did a version (I think the Coppers') on their 'Songs from Greenwich' LP.

John Benbow was indeed a Shrewsbury tanner's son. His grandfather, had been an admiral, on the losing side in the Civil War. After the Restoration, his grandson had to start from the bottom again.

There's a version in the Bodleian ballad library - I'll try and find it and post a link.

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 07 Oct 02 - 02:59 AM

Just as a point of interest, James 'Brasser' Copper who was born in 1845, used to sing 'Benbow' to his very young and impressionable grandson Bob (born 1915 and still going strong) as a lullaby! As Bob has recalled "that made me so scared, with images of the poor unfortunate admiral slipping around the deck on his bloody stumps - I was afraid to blow the candle out".

Interestingly and contrary to popular received wisdom regarding child rearing, this failed to prevent Bob from deveolping into a perfectly normal and well balanced adult. Save, that is from a morbid fear of double amputee naval officers so commonly seen around theses parts.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 07 Oct 02 - 02:01 AM

The text in the Penguin Book of Ballads is taken from Haliwell, Early Naval Ballads, 1841. It includes a form of the "Ruby and Noah's Ark" verse quoted earlier. According to Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time, 1859) Halliwell got the text from a broadside published by Fowler of Salisbury (late 18th century). Chappell himself prints another -similar- text, with tune, both from an unidentified broadside of "the first half" of the 18th century.

He also quotes the other Benbow song mentioned earlier (we need to be clear that these are two completely different songs: Roud numbers 227 and 3141 respectively). Another set of that (text from another Fowler broadside, tune from The Vocal Enchantress, 1783) appears in Roy Palmer's Boxing the Compass (formerly The Oxford Book of Sea Songs), 2001; this is close to the text quoted at the beginning of the first part of this thread, and to the broadside I indicated earlier, though with an additional verse. The Levy set, also, differs in a few particulars only.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Oct 02 - 10:16 PM

I double-checked the first version we have , and it almost perfectly matches the text in Sharp's One Hundred English Folksongs (Dover Reprint). (Sharp-100E in the Ballad Index)

The Traditional Ballad Index says there's another version in PBB, Penguin Book of Ballads - I don't have that book.

The other book cited is Chappell/Wooldridge - William Chappell, Old English Popular Music. Revised by H. Ellis Wooldridge (1893).

Don't have that one, either.

The UTK Song Index at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville has no listing for this song. No record at the American Memory Collection of the Library of Congress.

There is sheet music for the "we sailed to Virginia" version at the Levy Sheet Music Site, but I don't have time to transcribe it this week - anybody? We need a tune, too.

-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ZDTStudy: Admiral Benbow
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Oct 02 - 09:59 PM

Hi, Andy - I added crosslinks above to our previous thread, and the two versions we have in the Digital Tradition. Here is the entry from the Traditional Ballad Index. I guess we'll make this thread into a DTStudy and post and correct the Digital Tradition lyrics, too. The "we landed in Virginia" lyrics are in the other thread and I think I'll this thread with that one.
-Joe Offer-

Admiral Benbow (I)

DESCRIPTION: Despite being badly outnumbered, Benbow prepares for battle (against the French), but captains Kirkby and Wade flee the contest. In the fight that follows, Benbow loses his legs, but orders his face to be turned toward the fight even as he dies
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1841
KEYWORDS: battle sea death abandonment
HISTORICAL REFERENCES:
1702 - Death of Admiral John Benbow in battle in the West Indies
FOUND IN: Britain(England(South))
REFERENCES (7 citations):
CopperSeason, pp. 266-267, "Admiral Benbow" (1 text, 1 tune)
PBB 76, "The Death of Admiral Benbow" (1 text)
Sharp-100E 87, "Admiral Benbow" (1 text, 1 tune)
Chappell/Wooldridge II, pp. 92-93, "Admiral Benbow" (1 text, 1 tune)
DT, ADBENBOW* ADBENBW2
ADDITIONAL: Bertrand Bronson, "Samuel Hall's Family Tree,'" article published in the _California Folklore Quarterly_ (1942); also published in Bertrand Harris Bronson, _The Ballad as Song_ (essays on ballads), University of California Press, 1969, pp. 18-36; republished on pp. 30-47 of Norm Cohen, editor, _All This for a Song_, Southern Folklife Collection, 2009. The article discusses "Sam Hall," "Captain Kidd,,""Admiral Benbow," and related songs, with all or part of 16 texts and 9 tunes
C. H. Firth, _Publications of the Navy Records Society_ , 1907 (available on Google Books), p. 149, "The Death of Admiral Benbow" (1 text)

Roud #227
NOTES: The story outlined here is true in its general details. John Benbow (1653-1702), commanding the British in the West Indies, and was mortally wounded in battle with the French after two of his captains deserted him (the two were later tried and executed for cowardice). The battle took place off Cartagena (the one in Columbia, not the one in Spain; Mahan, p. 207). Benbow became a naval hero, and several later battleships were named for him.
One version of the story is briefly told in Herman, pp. 245-246. Herman argues that Benbow was wrong and his captains right: The British squadron of six ships was not strong enough to fight the French. But Benbow (who lost only his right leg, not both) lived long enough to order the court martial of the rebellious officers. The leader, Richard Kirkby of the Defiant, was executed, as was one of the other captains. This firmly established the principle of obedience to orders no matter how stupid.
Not everyone agrees with Herman's interpretation. Woodman devotes pp. 48-58 to Benbow and his subordinates, and draws a very different picture. Benbow was a very unusual admiral, in that he was a "tarpaulin" officer -- that is, one drawn from the ranks of the sailors, rather than a noble who went straight into the officer class (Woodman, p. 48). He didn't even come up through the naval ranks; he had gone to sea as a merchant sailor, and risen to captain, and then been offered a naval command by James II because he had done an impressive job of beating off a pirate attack (Brumwell/Speck, p. 48).
That background as a merchant sailor and a privateer as well as in the navy, and seems to have developed a very high opinion of his own judgment as a result (Woodman, p. 49). Woodman, p. 49, says that the French fleet under Ducasse had a fleet with a total of 258; Benbow's force he lists as having 456 guns. If true, then Benbow's decision to attack was reasonable.
Bruce/Cogar, p. 40, sum up Benbow's career as follows: "Although Benbow came to be regarded as a hero in popular legend, there remains a doubt about his place in British naval history and whether his high reputation was well deserved."
Clark, p. 317, summarizes the whole incident as follows: "Vice-Admiral John Benbow, with seven English ships, had a good opportunity of attacking a weaker French squadron which remained to operate against English and Dutch commerce. Unfortunately four of his captain failed to join the fight, and it was a failure. Benbow was mortally wounded. Two of the captains were court martialed and shot. There is a still popuar folk-song about this dramatic but unimportant event."
Brumwell/Speck, pp. 48-49, also considers Benbow's squadron superior to the French, and speculates that his officers refused orders because they considered him their social inferior.
Stokesbury, p. 108, also declares the French squadron "weak." He makes the interesting note that Benbow's story did not immediately inspire firm obedience by future captains; in 1708. Admiral Wager could not make his captains fight at Porto Bello.
Most texts of this fit the tune of "Captain Kidd" (and the only one I've seen which doesn't appears to have been fiddled with), though the tune in Chappell isn't quite the standard "Captain Kidd." It is also said to be used for "A Virgin Most Pure." We might note that Kidd went to the scaffold at the time Benbow was fighting his fight with the French.
This is not the only song about Benbow; Firth (who calls this one "The Death of Admiral Benbow") prints another, "Admiral Benbow," on p. 148. That is said to date from at least 1784, though it appears less popular than this (which seems to have first been printed in Halliwell's Early Naval Ballads).
Benbow's reputation as a stickler seems to have been richly deserved; in addition to his conduct in the battle that caused his death, he was tough on people who showed up in the West Indies without leave -- even if they were subjects of the British crown! When the Scottish Darien expedition resulted in disaster, a shipful of colonists fled to the Indies -- and were refused help by Benbow (Thomson, p. 88). - RBW
Bibliography
  • Bruce/Cogar: Anthony Bruce and William Cogar, An Encyclopedia of Naval History, 1998 (I use the 1999 Checkmark edition)
  • Brumwell/Speck: Stephen Brumwell and W. A. Speck, Cassell's Companion to Eighteenth-Century Britain, Cassell & Co., 2001
  • Clark: G. N. Clark, The Later Stuarts 1660-1714, corrected edition, Oxford, 1944
  • Herman: Arthur Herman, To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World, 2004 (I use the 2005 Harper Perennial edition)
  • Mahan: Alfred Thayer Mahan, The Influence of Sea Power Upon History 1660-1783, 1890 (mine is a reprint edition, but -- astonishingly -- it does not say who is the modern publisher!)
  • Stokesbury: James L. Stokesbury, Navy & Empire, Morrow, 1983
  • Thomson: Oliver Thomson, The Great Feud: The Campbells & The Macdonalds, Sutton Publishing, 2000
  • Woodman: Richard Woodman, A Brief History of Mutiny, Carroll & Graf, 2005.
Last updated in version 4.0
File: PBB076

Admiral Benbow (II)

DESCRIPTION: "Oh, we sail'd to Virginia, And from thence to Fial." The fleet sees seven sails. They draw up in line and fight for four hours. Admiral Benbow is wounded by a chain shot and is carried below but says to keep fighting. He is remembered after his death
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1891 (Ashton-Sailor)
KEYWORDS: battle sea death
HISTORICAL REFERENCES:
1702 - Death of Admiral John Benbow in battle in the West Indies
FOUND IN:
REFERENCES (1 citation):
Ashton-Sailor, #19 insert, "Admiral Benbow" (1 text)
Roud #3141
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Harding B 28(261), "Admiral Benbow," W. Armstrong (Liverpool) 1820-1824
NOTES: For background on John Benbow, see the notes to "Admiral Benbow (I)" - RBW
Last updated in version 3.2
File: AshS019i

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2017 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.



ADMIRAL BENBOW (DT Lyrics)

Come all ye seamen bold, and draw near
And draw near
Come all ye seamen bold, and draw near
It is of an admiral's fame
O brave Benbow was his name
How he fought all on the main
You shall hear, you shall hear.

Brave Benbow he set sail, for to fight
For to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail, for to fight.
Brave Benbow he set sail,
With a fine and pleasant gale
But his captains they turn'd tail
In a fright, in a fright.

Says Kirby unto Wade, "We will run,
We will run."
Says Kirby unto Wade, "We will run.
For I value no disgrace
Or the losing of my place
But the enemy I won't face
Nor his guns, nor his guns."

Then Ruby and Benbow fought the French
Fought the French,
Then Ruby and Benbow fought the French.
They fought them up and down
'Til the blood came trickling down
'Til the blood came trickling down
Where they lay, where they lay.

Brave Benbow lost his legs by chain shot
By chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs by chain shot.
Brave Benbow lost his legs
And all on his stumps he begs
Fight on, my English lads
'Tis our lot, 'tis our lot.

The surgeon dress'd his wounds, cries Benbow
Cries Benbow,
The surgeon dress'd his wounds, cries Benbow.
"Let a cradle now in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed,
That the enemy I may face
'Til I die, 'til I die.

From English Folk Songs, Sharp
@navy @battle @English
filename[ ADBENBOW
TUNE FILE: ADBENBOW
CLICK TO PLAY
TUNE FILE: ADBENBOW.2
CLICK TO PLAY
RG



PLEASE NOTE: Because of the volunteer nature of The Digital Tradition, it is difficult to ensure proper attribution and copyright information for every song included. Please assume that any song which lists a composer is copyrighted ©. You MUST aquire proper license before using these songs for ANY commercial purpose. If you have any additional information or corrections to the credit or copyright information included, please e-mail those additions or corrections to us (along with the song title as indexed) so that we can update the database as soon as possible. Thank You.

ADMIRAL BENBOW (2) (DT Lyrics)

Come all you seamen bold, landed here, landed here,
It is of an Admiral brave called Benbow by his name,
How he ploughed the raging main
You shall hear, you shall hear.

Last Tuesday morning last, Benbow sailed, Benbow sailed,
What a sweet and pleasant gale when Benbow he set sail
And the enemy they turned tail
In a fright, in a fright.

Great Reuben and Benbow fought the French, fought the French,
See the boats go up and down and the bullets whizzing round
And the enemy they knocked down,
There they lie, there they lie.

Oh, Benbow lost his legs, by chain-slot, by chain-shot,
Down on his stumps did fall and so loud for mercy called,
Oh, fight on my British tars,
It is my lot, it is my lot.

When the doctor dressed the wounds Benbow cried,
Benbow cried,
Oh, pray pick me up in haste to the quarter deck my place
That the enemy I might face
Until I die, until I die.

Last Tuesday morning last, Benbow died, Benbow died,
What a shocking sight to see when they carried him away
They carried him to Se'm's'on church
There he lays, there he lays.

Printed in The Copper Family Songbook - A Living Tradition
Recorded by The Copper Family on Song For Every Season
@sailor @battle @death
filename[ ADBENBW2
TUNE FILE: ADBENBW2
CLICK TO PLAY
SOF


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Tech: Admiral Benbow
From: GUEST,Andy Barnes
Date: 06 Oct 02 - 07:54 PM

At last I have found some time to have a go at a pet project I thought about some time ago. Out of all great sea going characters I believe Benbow is on of the most fascinating.

So what I'd like to do is collate as many songs ( and versions of )that folk are aware of.....

The two most frequently sung that I have to date are

Admiral Benbow 1

We sailed to Virgina etc

Admiral Benbow 2

My name it is Benbow etc

I will ultimately put everything together and make available to all so if you can help please, to save filling the thread, contact me at
atbarnes@netcomuk.co.uk

Many thanks

Andy
Messages from multiple threads combined. This message and messages below are from a new thread.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: greg stephens
Date: 12 Jul 02 - 01:06 PM

Charley,if youre having a glass IN the Admiral, watch out for the Black Spot.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Charley Noble
Date: 12 Jul 02 - 08:41 AM

Well, let's raise a glass to the Admiral, and all those who have so handily tidied up this thread!

Charley Noble, safe in the harbor


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: greg stephens
Date: 12 Jul 02 - 06:09 AM

Well I sort of imagined Benbow was on Ruby.By the by, anybody notice my Ned Sherrin play question? I cant have been the only person who saw it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Wolfgang
Date: 12 Jul 02 - 06:04 AM

The ship was the Breda according to this note (from Abby Sale).

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Charley Noble
Date: 11 Jul 02 - 08:50 PM

Walrus-

Thanks! That's more than I could find in my searches but does tally with what was rattling around in my brain back-up files. So it appears that Capt. Walton of the Ruby provided good faith support.

Any clue what Benbow's ship was named?

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: vectis
Date: 11 Jul 02 - 06:52 PM

The Coppers sing this as the last verse, wrongly burying Benbow at Selmeston in Sussex for a good reason.

Last Tuesday morning last, Benbow died, Benbow died,
What a shocking sight to see when they carried him away
They carried him to Se'm's'on church
There he lays, there he lays.

One of the Coppers (Grandad I think) went to Kingston village (in East Sussex) and looked everywhere for the grave of Benbow. When he couldn't find it he thought he must be buried further away so chose the name of a village more than a days walk from Kingston.
He had so little schooling that he didn't realise that the song referred to Kingston Jamaica.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: The Walrus at work
Date: 11 Jul 02 - 08:56 AM

Charley,

I've just found this (via Google)
"...Admiral John Benbow died in 1702. He was the son of a tanner in Shropshire who became admiral. During a battle with the French in the West Indes, all but one of his captains (including Wade and Kirkby) refused to pursue the French as ordered. Captain Walton of the Ruby pursued with Benbow until the Ruby was disabled. Benbow was wounded and his captains persuaded him to give up the chase. However, when they returned to Jamaica he had two of the captains court-martialed (another died before the trial) and shot. Two were suspended. Benbow later died of his wounds..."

Walrus


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Admiral Benbow lyrics
From: Charley Noble
Date: 10 Jul 02 - 08:02 PM

Walrus-

There's another version of "Admiral Benbow" to the tune of "Captain Kidd" which according to Captain W. B. Whall has a verse which runs:

'Twas the Ruby and Noah's Ark* fought the French, fought the French,
'Twas the Ruby and Noah's Ark* fought the French,
For there was ten in all,
Poor souls, they fought them all;
They valued them not at all, nor their noise, nor their noise,
They valued them not at all, nor their noise.

* Whall's notes that "Noah's Ark is probably a nickname for one of the oldest and out-of-date ships in the fleet, perhaps the Bredagh, which was one of Charles II's fleet."

I'm still looking for other references to the other supporting ship.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 25 September 12:15 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.