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Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green

Mad Maudlin 19 Apr 01 - 03:09 AM
Maryrrf 19 Apr 01 - 09:37 AM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Apr 01 - 10:27 AM
Mad Maudlin 19 Apr 01 - 02:59 PM
Maryrrf 19 Apr 01 - 04:46 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 19 Apr 01 - 05:36 PM
Mad Maudlin 19 Apr 01 - 06:14 PM
Mad Maudlin 19 Apr 01 - 06:17 PM
Wolfgang 20 Apr 01 - 07:51 AM
Maryrrf 20 Apr 01 - 09:41 AM
Malcolm Douglas 20 Apr 01 - 09:46 AM
Mad Maudlin 20 Apr 01 - 12:19 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 20 Apr 01 - 11:07 PM
Susanne (skw) 22 Apr 01 - 06:59 PM
Malcolm Douglas 22 Apr 01 - 08:48 PM
Big Tim 23 Apr 01 - 06:10 AM
Malcolm Douglas 23 Apr 01 - 09:51 AM
Ella who is Sooze 03 Oct 01 - 05:49 AM
Pene Azul 04 Oct 01 - 05:04 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 04 Oct 01 - 05:38 AM
Ella who is Sooze 05 Oct 01 - 04:34 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 05 Oct 01 - 04:56 AM
IanC 05 Oct 01 - 06:23 AM
GUEST 24 Mar 04 - 03:11 PM
Stewie 24 Mar 04 - 05:35 PM
lamarca 24 Mar 04 - 06:02 PM
Peterr 20 Jul 04 - 11:28 AM
MartinRyan 20 Jul 04 - 02:23 PM
MartinRyan 20 Jul 04 - 02:29 PM
Peterr 21 Jul 04 - 07:19 AM
MartinRyan 29 Apr 09 - 03:20 PM
The Borchester Echo 29 Apr 09 - 03:39 PM
Jim Dixon 01 May 09 - 12:41 AM
GUEST,John Kirkpatrick 10 Aug 09 - 02:31 PM
GUEST,patrickdebee 17 Dec 09 - 11:54 AM
GUEST,patrickdebee 17 Dec 09 - 12:26 PM
GUEST,patrickdebee 18 Dec 09 - 10:12 AM
GUEST,patrickdebee 18 Dec 09 - 10:19 AM
Barry T 18 Dec 09 - 01:25 PM
Ptarmigan 29 Jun 11 - 02:50 AM
GUEST,J.Kennedy. County Antrim. 02 Nov 11 - 05:52 AM
Jim Martin 02 Nov 11 - 09:07 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: BONNY WOODHALL
From: Mad Maudlin
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 03:09 AM

BONNY WOODHALL

(trad.)

Down by yon green bushes near Calder's clear stream
Where me and my Annie so often have been
When the hours flew past us, right happy were we,
It was little she thought thst a soldier I'd be

But it's farewell to Annie and I must away
For the King he needs soldiers and I must obey.
But if providence proves kind, love, until I return
I will wed with dear Annie near Calder's clear burn

On the 14th of August our regiment was lost
And a ball from the enemy lines came across
It struck me in the temple, the blood trickled down
I reeled and I staggered and I fell to the ground.

"come here," says our captain, "come here with good speed
For I fear my dear sport, young Dinsmore, lies dead."
Two men with a stretcher did quickly prepare,
And they carried me away to a hospital there.

Cold water and brandy they poured out so free,
They turned me all over my wounds for to see.
But if I had my Annie to bind up my wounds
One kiss from her sweet lips would soon deaden the pain.

And it's when I am weary and think of my time
When I was a miner and worked in the mine
Oh, the tears they do trickle and down they do fall
like the roses that bloom around bonny Woodhall.

I'm typing this from memory, but I think it was recorded by Andy Irvine.

NG


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Maryrrf
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 09:37 AM

Recently it was recorded by Niamh Parsons - beautifully! Instead of "deaden the 'pain" she sings "deaden the 'stoon'. I don't have a clue what a 'stoon' is. I think Andy Irvine sings it that way too. I may change that word to 'pain' when I sing it - it makes more sense. Anybody know what 'stoon' means?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 10:27 AM

Presuming this to be a Scottish song, "stoon" or, for a better rhyme, the more common spelling "stound", is an ache or pain.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Mad Maudlin
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 02:59 PM

Hey, thanks for telling me, I always thought it was "pain" since I didn't know the word (English is not my native tongue). So I've learned something again - cool!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Maryrrf
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 04:46 PM

Thank you, Malcolm. Yes, it said in the liner notes that it is a Scottish song. I'm wondering what period it dates from. It's beautiful. I listened to it at Borders at the listening station for CD's and immediately bought it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 05:36 PM

It's in 'the Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection', V, #947, 1995, where the note is 'Cf. Ord, p. 310', but I don't have that yet.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Mad Maudlin
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 06:14 PM

Maryrrf: I don't really know when this song was written (yes, it's a real beauty!), but to me it feels as if it had been written in the Nspeoleonic era. That's really just a gut feeling, if any of you knows more, I'd like to know, too!

(Sorry if grammar is breaking down, it's far past midnight over here...;-)

Good night,

Mad Maudlin


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Mad Maudlin
Date: 19 Apr 01 - 06:17 PM

Awww...see what I mean? Now she can't even type anymore! It's Napoleonic, of course!


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Subject: Lyr Add: BONNY WOODHALL (from Andy Irvine)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 20 Apr 01 - 07:51 AM

Mad Maudlin,
first thanks for posting that beautiful song and congratulations to your memory. What you have posted is very close to what Andy Irvine sings (I have his songbook 'Aiming for the heart' which makes it easy to listen to what he sings in the two virtually identical versions I have on record: one with Paul Brady, one with Mick Hanly). Down below I'll post Andy Irvine's version with the few changes from your version in bold. I'm far from saying 'this is the correct version', I just post it for comparison.

Andy Irvine's note: 'This song is Scottish in origin and though I learned it from Sam Henry's collection [# 476] of songs from the North of Ireland, I have never heard it sung there.'

A different, more Scottish version is found in 'Bothy songs and ballads' (Ord?; I have a xerox; should I post it here, Bruce?). This version is closer to how Dick Gaughan sings it on the double LP 'Bonny Pit Laddie'. Al O' Donnell sings it too on his second album, but it is not an independent version for he got it from Gaughan.

The much discussed line is:
'...would staunch all the stoons' in 'Bonnie pit laddie' and
'...soothe all the stounds' in 'Bothy songs and ballads'.

Wolfgang

Andy Irvine's version follows:

BONNY WOODHALL

(trad.)

Down by yon green bushes near Calder's clear stream
Where me and my Annie so often have been
When the hours flew past us, right happy were we,
It was little she thought that a soldier I'd be

But it's farewell to Annie and I must away
For the King he needs soldiers and I must obey.
But if providence proves kind, love, until I return
I will wed with dear Annie near Calder's clear burn

On the 14th of August our regiment was lost
And a ball from the enemy our lines came across
It struck me in the temple and the blood trickled down
I reeled and I staggered and I fell to the ground.

"come here," says our captain, "come here with good speed
For I fear by this bullet, young Dinsmore, lies dead."
Two men with a stretcher did quickly prepare,
And they carried me away to a hospital there.

Cold water and brandy they poured out so free,
They turned me all over my wounds for to see.
But if I had my Annie to bind up my wounds
One kiss from her sweet lips would soon deaden the stoun.

And it's when I am weary and think on lang syne
When I was a miner and wrought in the mine
Oh, the tears they do trickle and down they do fall
like the roses that bloom around bonny Woodhall.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Maryrrf
Date: 20 Apr 01 - 09:41 AM

My gut feeling was also that it referred to the Napoleonic period. So we must be right!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 20 Apr 01 - 09:46 AM

Ord doesn't give a tune, but Henry and Susanne's Songbook site has staff notation and a midi:  Bonnie Woodhall.  Whether it was transcribed from Songs of the People or from Irvine's recording, I don't know.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Mad Maudlin
Date: 20 Apr 01 - 12:19 PM

Wolfgang,

Glad you liked the song. Song lyrics are the only thing I can remember well...but don't ask me for birthdays and important dates:-) It was interesting to read another version of this song as well.

Maryrrf: Of course we're right. Women always are aren't they? *BG* (just kidding) But it's amazing how two people can have the same impression of a song!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 20 Apr 01 - 11:07 PM

I'm beginning to suspect that the version in the Greig- Duncan collection wasn't a traditional version. There's no tune, date collected, place collected, or name of singer. Greig sometimes published old songs in the Buchan Observer articles that he hadn't collected, in order to stir his reader's memories to think about what they could remember. I suspect his copy was from a printed source he found some place.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 06:59 PM

Malcolm, Henry says he got the notes from Dick Gaughan's website. The arrangement and sequencing were done by Ron Clarke, who also collaborates on 'My Songbook'.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 08:48 PM

Thankyou, Susanne.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Big Tim
Date: 23 Apr 01 - 06:10 AM

WHERE is the song set? There are at least 6 river Calders in England and Scotland.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 23 Apr 01 - 09:51 AM

Probably North Lanarkshire, where there is a Woodhall House on the bank of the North Calder Water.


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Subject: Origins of song: Bonnywood Green
From: Ella who is Sooze
Date: 03 Oct 01 - 05:49 AM

Hello, just wanted to know apart from the obvious... about the song, Bonnywood green.

Like, where it originates from, who wrote it, and whats the background...

It mentions both the Wars in Africa, and then the First World war, but what else?

I know the Irish soldier goes to war, and then regrets it, as he dies and never see's his true queen (his lover) again.

I have six verses for the song, are there any more?

Regards

Ella

Anything else... any info pleas


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Subject: RE: Origins of song: Bonnywood Green
From: Pene Azul
Date: 04 Oct 01 - 05:04 AM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Origins of song: Bonnywood Green
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 04 Oct 01 - 05:38 AM

Ella

not sure which song you mean. Can you post your version or provide a link?

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: BONNY WOOD GREEN
From: Ella who is Sooze
Date: 05 Oct 01 - 04:34 AM

Sure...it's...

Down among the green bushes in Bonny Wood Green
Where me and my true love were oft times were seen
As the years they rolled by, ahh, happy were we
'Twas little she thought that a soldier I'd be.

Early next morning as the lambs they did play
Way down by Kells Barracks I there made my way
And there I enlisted to fight for the queen
For a cause to uphold I left Bonny Wood Green

In Larne Harbour a troop ship lay waiting to sail
Whilst mothers were weeping and sisters grew pale
We were singing and dancing as the band they did play
Ahh was little we thought on our graves far away

Out on African soils there's both diamonds and gold
The scene of these troubles for wealth I am told
Where the thousands of men were forced to lay low
Defending their country whilst fighting the foe.

Away out in Flanders at the back of the line
We were talking of sweethearts we'd left far behind
When a young Irish soldier, said I've got a queen
And she works in John Ross' in Bonny Wood Green.

Early next morning whilst fighting the foe,
One shot from the enemy and he was laid low
He called to his comrades, it was a sad scene
Take this message to Nellie in Bonny Wood Green

If ever to Ireland you happen to stray
There's a neat little spot called Port Ballinatrae
Where the weavers and winders are inclined to be seen
They're weaving white linen in Bonny Wood Green.

That's they way I was taught it...

Thanks Pene for refreshing my message... does this shed any light to anyone?

Thanks

Ella


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Subject: RE: Origins of song: Bonnywood Green
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 05 Oct 01 - 04:56 AM

Thought that might be it alright! Lots of Scottish and Irish versions, under various names. Tune is "Down by the Green Bushes", usually. If Malcolm Douglas doesn't come up with his usual comprehensive answer, I'll dig up some details!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: IanC
Date: 05 Oct 01 - 06:23 AM

Could just as easily be the village of Woodhall, near Aysgarth in Yorkshire. The river Calder isn't exactly far from there, and there are also lots of (historic) mines, so it would fit the geography easily as well.

:-)
Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 03:11 PM

This song refers to the North Calder Water at Woodhall in Lanarkshire. That is beyond doubt, bonny, burn, stoun and of course Auld Lang Syne are all Scottish references.

There is a twenty foot high weir at this point on the river where a sluice draws water from the river to supply the Monkland canal and other Lowland canals.

Robert Murray
Lanrkshire
Scotland


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BALLAD SINGER (Archie Fisher)
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 05:35 PM

Yesterday, I was listening to Al O'Donnell's lovely rendition of this song - mentioned above by Wolfgang - when working on transferring my aged vinyl copy to disk. As a singer O'Donnell really was something special. I had forgotten that the sleeve of his first album had a lovely little poem by Archie Fisher:

THE BALLAD SINGER (To Al O'Donnell)
(Archie Fisher - 1968)

I watched a piper take the wind that blew around his hair
And with the supple leather
    lead the hard black wood and brittle reed
A dance into the air

I watched a boy that stood with men
A whistle at his tongue
Breathe the old and smokey air into his breast
    then with careful fingers
Make it young

I saw a chin rest on a fiddle
And watched the fingers dance
Letting the notes slip from the strings into the wind
    that takes all things
That music leaves to chance

I heard the singer read the wind
And listened to his song
That told of all the wind had known
    and when and where the wind had blown
And why he'd been so long


--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: lamarca
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 06:02 PM

This has been one of my favorite songs for many years. I learned it from Andy Irvine's recording with Paul Brady, and would sing it to myself when no-one was around. At a song circle one evening long ago, I gathered up my courage and sang Bonny Woodhall for the first time in front of other people. At the end of the song, everyone was hushed and appreciative...

then my husband piped up, whining "You never take me to My Annie..."

I nearly killed him.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Peterr
Date: 20 Jul 04 - 11:28 AM

Just discovered Al O'Donnell from a vinyl lent me by Patrick Carroll (he of 'Dublin Lady' and 'Old Woman in Cotton'0. What a fine singer, and amazing guitarist


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: MartinRyan
Date: 20 Jul 04 - 02:23 PM

Aas fara as I know, Al has been singing again, occasionally, at the Howth Singers Circle, in Dublin, in recent times.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: MartinRyan
Date: 20 Jul 04 - 02:29 PM

Sorry about the aaaaaa's. Must be developing a twitch in my little finger!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: Peterr
Date: 21 Jul 04 - 07:19 AM

Thanks MartinRyan - Patrick will be very pleased to hear it


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall
From: MartinRyan
Date: 29 Apr 09 - 03:20 PM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Origins of song: Bonny Wood Green
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 29 Apr 09 - 03:39 PM

Jon Boden in his introduction to Bold Sir Rylas says that for this song you have to imagine a nice Green Wood with grass and a river and deer and stuff . . .

Like Wood Green Shopping City? said a wag on one occasion. That's it, said Mr Boden.

This concrete monstrosity is just down the road from me (you know the sort of thing, all those trash shops you find in any city centre around the world plus a McRubbish), topped by a horrendous housing estate fulfilling its function of keeping up the Hsringey crime levels.

So. is that the song you want? Wood Green ain't bonny . . . but then, neither were The Boys Of Bedlam.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BONNIE WOODHA'
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 May 09 - 12:41 AM

I copied this version from Folk-song in Buchan: and Folk-song of the North-east by Gavin Greig (Hatboro, Pa.: Folklore Associates, 1963).

However, I had to piece this together from several "snippets." I suspect something is missing, because there seems to be a strange shift in point of view in the last verse.


BONNIE WOODHA'

Down by yon green bushes near Calder's clear stream
Where I and my Annie sae often hae been,
When the hours they flew past us, right happy were we.
It was little she thought that a soldier I'd be.

Fare-ye-weel, Annie, for I maun away.
My country calls on me, so I must obey;
But if Heaven protects me until I return,
I will sport wi' ye, Annie, by sweet Calder's Burn.

Here's tae my auld father, his lips are now cauld.
Likewise my auld mither, for she's getting auld.
When I was a wee thing and played round her knee,
It was little she thought that a soldier I'd be.

On the twentieth of August, our regiment was lost,
And a shot from the enemy our lines came across.
It struck me on the forehead; the blood it rin down.
I reeled and I staggered and fell to the ground.

"Come here," cried the captain. "Come here with great speed.
I'm afraid by yon bullet young Dinsmore is dead."
They poured out the water and brandy so free,
And they turned me all over my wounds for to see.

If I had my Annie she'd bind up my wounds.
One word from her sweet mouth would soothe all the stounds.
Wi' God's will, I'll get better, and when I return,
I will sport wi' my Annie near sweet Calder's Burn.

Oft times when I'm wearied and think o' langsyne,
When I was a collier and wrought in the mine,
Oh, the tears they do trickle and doon they do fa',
Like the dew on the gowans at bonnie Woodha'.

Noo freens and relations, d'ye see what I've got
For gaun wi' the laddie that wears the red coat?
But I maun aff and dress noo, and mak' mysel' braw
To wed handsome young Dinsmore o' bonnie Woodha'.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: GUEST,John Kirkpatrick
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 02:31 PM

One version called Bonnie Woodgreen (note the spelling) is set in a townland near the village of Kells (no, not the famous one!) which located near the town of Ballymena in County Antrim, N. Ireland. The reference to "Kells Barracks" would refer to the practice of signing-up for the army at the local police station, while "Larne Harbour" was one of the main routes from the Province to the mainland of England.
There is no verse about Africa; other variations include:
"There's a neat little spot called Ballymacveigh" (again, this is in the Kells area)
"They're wearing white aprons in bonny Woodgreen"

The soldiers' girlfriend would seem to have worked in John Ross's linen factory near to Woodgreen: this factory still exists, although it is now a dyeworks rather than a linen mill.

It's always amazing to see how some traditional songs were adapted to suit the local area where they were being performed


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: GUEST,patrickdebee
Date: 17 Dec 09 - 11:54 AM

And here is Sam Henry's 'Songs of the People' version.

I have transcribed it exactly as it appears on page 84 in the 1990 edition. The differences between this version and Andy Irvine's version ('Aiming For The Heart', 1988 edition) are highlighted in bold typeface.

Like so many of you who contributed to this thread, I learned this wonderful song from Andy's version and I am proud to have made the effort (over the years!) to play it note for note on my Gibson H1 mandola strung, in Andy's own way, with mandolin strings and tuned down to FCGC, in an attempt to get as close as possible to his own sound.

I also sing Andy's version of the lyrics, although I have made the following 'adjustments':

1. At 2:4, I sing a hybrid of both versions:

'I will wed with you, Annie, near Calder's clear burn.'

thus keeping the rhythm of the word group 'wed with' from Andy's version, but returning to the 'you' of Sam Henry's collected version, which enables me to emphasise 'you', thereby seeming to address Annie directly, as if still in her presence. When I sing it this way, it greatly heightens the poignancy of his longing (IMHO).

2. At 6:4, I use Sam Henry's collected version, but with 'Woodhall' at the end (in order to rhyme with the word 'fall' from the previous line in Andy's version):

Like the dew on the roses near bonny Woodhall.

thus preserving the original poetry of the dew as a metaphor for our hero's tears.

In any case, here is Sam Henry's collected version, as it appears on page 84:
----------------------------------------------------------------   
Bonny Woodha' [H476: 14 Jan 1933]

o: (m) "The Green Bushes"; g: "Sweet Calder Burn."
Source not given.
Key G.

Down by yon green bushes, near Calder's clear stream,
Where I and my Annie sae often have been,
When the hours that flew past us, right happy were we,
It was little she thought that a sailor I'd be.

I said to my Annie, 'I now must away,
My country calls on me and I must obey,
But if heaven protect me until I return,
I will wed you, my Annie, near Calder's clear burn.'

On the fourteenth of August our regiment was lost,
When a ball from the enemy my line came across,
It struck me on the forehead, the blood trickled down,
I reeled and I staggered and I fell to the ground.

'Come here,' said our captain, 'come here with good speed,'
For I fear by this bullet young Dinsmore lies dead.'
Two men with a stretcher did quickly prepare
And they carried me off to an hospital there.

Cold water and brandy they poured out so free,
And they turned me all over, my wounds for to see,
But if I had my Annie to bind up my wounds,
One kiss from her sweet lips would deaden the stoun.

It's when I am weary and think on lang syne,
When I was a miner and wrought in yon mine
The tears they do trickle and down they do fa'
Like the dew on the roses near bonny Woodha'.

5.4: stoun [stound] = pang, throb, pain. [m]
-------------------------------------------------------------------


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: GUEST,patrickdebee
Date: 17 Dec 09 - 12:26 PM

If anyone coming across my previous entry ends up wondering why the bold typeface is missing, which I promised to use in order to highlight the differences between Sam Henry's and Andy Irvine's versions...

Well; I *did* highlight the differences in the Word document I created while I was drafting the text to submit. I then copied the final text from my Word document into the 'Reply to Thread' box, only to find that the latter seems to convert the original font (Times New Roman) into what seems like 'Courrier' after I pasted my entry. Once I clicked on 'Submit Message', the resulting entry reverted back to the original 'Time New Roman' font, but without keeping the bold characters that were in the original...

I am sorry this happened but, since I don't know how to fix this, those of you who are really keen to work out the differences might have to print both versions and compare them word for word.

In any case, I apologise for misleading you with false promises... ;-)

Great love to all;
Patrick.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: GUEST,patrickdebee
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 10:12 AM

It's me again...

In my first entry above (17 Dec 09 @ 11:54AM), I primarily wanted to provide the lyrics for Sam Henryfs version, but I could have been a little more complete about playing the tune and in what key.

Although Sam Henryfs version indicates itfs in the key of G, Andy actually plays it in the key of E. On the Gibson H1 mandola strung with mandolin strings and tuned FCGC as mentioned above, this therefore requires capo3 or, alternatively, capo1 if playing on a enormalf mandolin tuned GDAD. So, the resulting eopenf tuning is AEBE.

Great love to all;
Patrick.

[I can see that my 'flats' are being converted to Courrier 'squares' in the 'Reply to Thread' data entry box! Hope they will show up correctly after I clicked the 'Submit Message' button!]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: GUEST,patrickdebee
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 10:19 AM

[Darn it! Here is that paragraph again, with the musical notation for 'flat' replaced by the word 'flat'!!!]

Although Sam Henry's version indicates it's in the key of G, Andy actually plays it in the key of Eflat. On the Gibson H1 mandola strung with mandolin strings and tuned FCGC as mentioned above, this therefore requires capo3 or, alternatively, capo1 if playing on a 'normal' mandolin tuned GDAD. So, the resulting 'open' tuning is Aflat/Eflat/Bflat/Eflat.

Great love to all;
Patrick.

[I apologise for messing up this thread with font-related corrections, but why isn't this facility working in WYSIWYG mode???]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: Barry T
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 01:25 PM

John Kirkpatrick: Thanks for the background info on the Antrim iteration of the song, in this case titled 'Bonny Woodgreen'. I sequenced this version based on that sung by Joe Millar of 'The Irish Rovers'.

Bonnie Woodgreen

Thanks, too, for identifying/clarifying the reference to Ballymacveigh, which I misinterpreted while transcribing from the recording.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: Ptarmigan
Date: 29 Jun 11 - 02:50 AM

To whom it may concern:

North Calder Water, Lanarkshire

Woodhall House:
Woodhall House was built, or possibly rebuilt, by Daniel Campbell of Shawfield sometime between 1711 and 1727.
The house was demolished sometime after 1924, and the pavilions more recently.
Woodhall House

.... & just out of interest ;-)

Woodhall, Kilrea on the Antrim/Derry border.
The Centre is situated on the outskirts of Kilrea on the County Borders of Antrim and Londonderry.
( N.B. A few miles south of Coleraine )
Built in 1904 as a private residence,
Woodhall, Kilrea, Derry


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Subject: Lyr Add: BONNY WOOD GREEN
From: GUEST,J.Kennedy. County Antrim.
Date: 02 Nov 11 - 05:52 AM

Wood Green is an area in County Antrim. In the version that I have been using for about 50 years it is very much a version of the song based on that geographical area. (Most people here know of Wood Green only because it is a railway line that runs near the international airport at Aldergrove) It is synonymous with the origin of another well known traditional song called 'Kellswater' referring to the little river that runs through the beautiful village of Kells, then into the River Braid and eventually into the River Bann and to the sea. By a strange co-incidence as a young student I had a vacation job which took me frequently to John Rosses to collect linen yarn for the factory in which I worked.

Here are the words I use when performing the song.

Down among the green bushes in bonny Wood Green
Where me and my true love we oft times were seen
Ah, the years they rolled by and so happy were we
For twas little she knew that a soldier I'd be

It was early one morning and the lambs they did play
I went to Kells barracks and then made my way
To enlist as a soldier and to fight for the King
To uphold a good cause I left bonny Wood Green

Oh, bonny Wood Green, bonny Wood Green
To uphold a good cause I left bonny Wood Green

And soon we were ordered away o'er the foam
For soldiers were needed for to fight for their home
I kissed my love Nell, she appeared like the Queen
And softly she whispered, "Remember Wood Green"

Remember Wood Green, remember Wood Green
And softly she whispered, "Remember Wood Green"

It was way out in Flanders at the back of the line
We were talking of sweethearts that we'd left behind
Said one Irish soldier, "Well, I've got a queen"
And she works in John Rosses in bonny Wood Green

In bonny Wood Green, in bonny Wood Green
And she works in John Rosses in bonny Wood Green

It was early next morning when the sun was still low
And the bullets were flying and he was laid low
He turned to his mates in a terrible scene
He said, "Kiss my love Nell and remember Wood Green"

Oh, remember Wood Green, remember Wood Green
Oh, kiss my love Nell and remember Wood Green

So if ever to Ulster you happen to stray
There's a neat litte factory near Ballynafeigh
Where the weavers and the winders are faint to be seen
For they all wear white aprons round bonny Wood Green

Round bonny Wood Green, round bonny Wood Green
For they all wear white aprons round bonny Wood Green


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bonny Woodhall/Bonny Wood Green
From: Jim Martin
Date: 02 Nov 11 - 09:07 AM

There's a very brief clip here of Davy Hammond singing his version (at the end of the clip):

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/northern_ireland/7582478.stm


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Mudcat time: 16 September 11:31 PM EDT

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