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Alex Glasgow-info & songs

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SALLY WHEATLEY


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Close the Coalhouse Door (Alex Glasgow) (40)
Lyr Req: My Daddy Is a Left-Wing Intellectual (10)
Lyr Req: Keep Your Hand on Your Ha'penny (Glasgow) (22)
Lyr Req: Wallsend Butcher (Leonard Barras) (29)
Lyr Req: Keep Your Hand on Your Ha'penny (Glasgow) (7)
Obit: Alex Glasgow (1935-2001) (12)
Lyr Req: As Soon as This Pub Closes (Alex Glasgow) (33)
Req: Workers ABC / Socialist ABC (Alex Glasgow) (5)
Lyr Req: All in a Day (Alex Glasgow) (11)
Lyr Req: Ours! Ours! Ours! Ours! ...(Alex Glasgow) (9)


Shields Folk 13 May 01 - 06:15 PM
GUEST 14 May 01 - 06:18 AM
Wolfgang 14 May 01 - 06:29 AM
IanC 14 May 01 - 06:44 AM
GUEST 14 May 01 - 12:24 PM
AndyG 14 May 01 - 12:36 PM
bobby's girl 15 May 01 - 07:02 PM
Shields Folk 15 May 01 - 07:22 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 15 May 01 - 07:37 PM
Steve Parkes 16 May 01 - 04:02 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 16 May 01 - 05:14 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 16 May 01 - 08:23 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 16 May 01 - 08:54 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 16 May 01 - 08:59 AM
AndyG 16 May 01 - 10:20 AM
Joe Offer 19 Nov 01 - 06:55 PM
GUEST,DMcG 20 Nov 01 - 08:55 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 20 Nov 01 - 10:36 AM
GUEST,DMcG 21 Nov 01 - 08:18 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 27 Nov 01 - 04:47 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 27 Nov 01 - 05:30 AM
GUEST 04 Apr 03 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,jim 04 Apr 03 - 01:31 PM
John MacKenzie 04 Apr 03 - 02:11 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 04 Apr 03 - 05:13 PM
alanabit 05 Apr 03 - 02:46 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 05 Apr 03 - 10:44 AM
GUEST,bigJ 05 Apr 03 - 12:09 PM
Geoff the Duck 06 Apr 03 - 12:14 PM
BUTTERFLY 06 Apr 03 - 04:56 PM
GUEST,Loftus 07 Apr 03 - 04:46 PM
GUEST,belfast (sans cookie) 28 Feb 05 - 11:33 AM
Geoff the Duck 28 Feb 05 - 04:27 PM
GUEST,Claire Whiting 17 Sep 05 - 02:00 PM
GUEST,Geoff the Duck 18 Sep 05 - 01:32 PM
GUEST,Dan Glasgow 07 Feb 06 - 08:20 AM
GUEST,Jonathan Rhodes 10 Apr 06 - 04:51 PM
GUEST,Paul Lane 11 Apr 06 - 02:32 PM
GUEST,Paul Lane 11 Apr 06 - 05:17 PM
GUEST,Ruth Ling 23 Mar 08 - 10:54 PM
GUEST,GUEST,Stephen Tyley 10 Nov 08 - 06:55 PM
Big Al Whittle 10 Nov 08 - 10:21 PM
Mavis Enderby 03 Feb 09 - 07:17 AM
GUEST,Byker Lil 03 Dec 10 - 12:20 PM
GUEST,Byker Lil 03 Dec 10 - 12:23 PM
Treacle Bolly 03 Dec 10 - 03:03 PM
Leadfingers 03 Dec 10 - 07:18 PM
GUEST,Dan Glasgow 22 Aug 11 - 11:23 PM
GUEST,Jez Lowe 06 Jul 13 - 12:15 PM
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Subject: Alex Glasgow
From: Shields Folk
Date: 13 May 01 - 06:15 PM

As a lad in the 70's I remember the odd TV program we watched as part of History lessons at school. They were all full of depressing stuff about the twenties, the Jarrow Crusade and the like, and the programs always seemed to feature one song or another by Alex Glasgow. I remember one about Eldon Square, Newcastle, it was about the old Eldon Square lying in the coffin of the new development. Does anyone else remember it and if so what were the words?


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST
Date: 14 May 01 - 06:18 AM

This name jolted me back a bit but what came into me head was "Close the Coal House Door Lads". Am I right in thinking this was by the same man?
KJ


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Wolfgang
Date: 14 May 01 - 06:29 AM

from a websearch: no help for you, Shields Folk, but here's a bit for you, KJ:

Close the coalhouse door : a stage play in three acts / by Alan Plater ; from stories by Sid Chaplin ; with songs by Alex Glasgow.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: IanC
Date: 14 May 01 - 06:44 AM

Hi

The song about Eldon Square ain't in "Close The Coalhouse Door". I went to the premiere of this at the University Theatre, Newcastle in ?1971 and, somewhere, I have the songbook. By the way, the night I went was the day Sunderland won the FA cup - so another reason for mourning along the Tyne!

Alex was used for loads of dour TV programmes about the "Industrial North" as you say, SF. Probably most of the songs were composed specifically for the programmes and are lost, but you could try looking through his web site here

Alex Glasgow

or e-mailing him.

Cheers!
Ian


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST
Date: 14 May 01 - 12:24 PM

Lord Shaftsbury? I'd swear it was Lord Robens (Chairman of the National Coal Board) in the tv version.

There was a book of the songs from tha show came out soon after. I had a copy, but it growed legs and walked ...

Steve


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: AndyG
Date: 14 May 01 - 12:36 PM

The Northern Drift was also the name of both the Radio and TV shows presented/performed/written ? by Henry Livings, Alex Glasgow and others.

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: bobby's girl
Date: 15 May 01 - 07:02 PM

I remember watching "Close the Coalhouse Door" at Leeds Playhouse when I was at university in the early 70's- a brilliant play. The best rendition of the tune itself is from the Wilsons - it's almost their theme song, and it makes the hair walk up the back of my head whenever I hear it. I have a vague memory that Alex Glasgow added the verse about the children in the coalhouse after Aberfan, and it wasn't in the original. Sorry to hear that he too has gone on (as they say in Dorset), Sam Sherry, Douglas Adams and Alex Glasgow - Definately not a good week.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Shields Folk
Date: 15 May 01 - 07:22 PM

Its bloody funny. I've never thought of the bloke since I was a kid, and the day I do the he goes and dies. Bugger me! Still no further on with the song about Eldon Square though but.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 15 May 01 - 07:37 PM

Shit, that's a blow, Gervase, coming right when the old memories have just been stirred up.

I'd go along with Robens for the stage play, Ian - still puzzling about the telly and the book (a copy of which I have somewhere, but I can't find the damn thing.)

Steve, Robens took a hammering in the Aberfan report (the report that added "bungling ineptitude" to our national idiom) but the NUM, NACODS and BACM all joined a vociferous campaign that persuaded the government to reject his tendered resignation. He resigned at the end of his second five-year term, aged 60, in 1971, in protest at the Heath government's decision to privatise profitable elements of the industry. (The term in those days was "hiving off.")


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 16 May 01 - 04:02 AM

Bad news about Alex.

Fionn, I heard that Robens wanted to go to Aberfan and meet the people to apologise personally, but he was persuaded that "it wouldn't be a good idea"; and of course, everyone took it as an insult and a sign that he was too ashamed or frightened to go. I think the image took a long time to fade.

Steve


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 16 May 01 - 05:14 AM

No obit yet but this from an old Guardian article may be of interest:

Angels with dirty faces It started as a celebration and ended as an elegy to a lost world. Playwright Alan Plater describes the bizarre life of Close the Coalhouse Door

Alan Plater Guardian

Wednesday July 12, 2000

A third of a century ago, a meeting was convened in the Newcastle front room of the late Sid Chaplin, Durham pitman turned short story writer and novelist. Those present were singer-songwriter Alex Glasgow, director Bill Hays and myself - all native north-easterners. Indeed, I once said to a Labour MP during a radio interview: "I was born in Jarrow - beat that for credentials."

Sid gave us some stories, Alex wrote the songs, Richard Fynes's 1873 classic The Miners of Northumberland and Durham gave us all the history we needed, and inherited prejudice did the rest. I assembled the bits into a show called Close the Coalhouse Door, which opened in April 1968 at the old Newcastle Playhouse (later demolished in the cause of "road improvements") to rave notices and sell-out business.

On the first night my agent, Peggy Ramsay, grabbed my arm after and said: "My God, darling, this is revolutionary." Later, when the London managements came hot on its trail, she said it was much too tough for the West End. She was right. Brian Rix, a former Bevin boy, bravely put the show on at the Fortune Theatre to more rave reviews - the critics voted it the best musical of the year - and sparse audiences, most of whom I subsequently met.

It was when the revivals began that the project got a little complicated. The form of the show is the golden wedding party of Thomas and Mary Milburn. The guests reminisce about the history of their village and Brockenback pit (a real name Sid provided), starting in the 1830s and finishing in the present. The style of the piece begins with documentary realism, then drifts through vaudeville into a kind of unspoken surrealism.

In the third act Lord Hailsham turns up and sings a song called My Little Cloth Cap, closely followed by Harold Wilson with the words: "Good evening, brothers, I've just popped in to explain the government's fuel policy."

The problem was defining the "now". Ted Heath arrived on the scene and was written into the show, as were the successful miners' strikes of 1972 and 1974. I wrote the amendments for the 1974 Leeds Playhouse revival by candlelight, during the blackouts resulting from Sailor Ted's three-day weeks. But the narrative logic meant that our central couple, Thomas and Mary (named after my grandparents) became older and older and the show got longer and longer.

Arguably, the most adventurous version was performed by a fringe company from Wales, as a three-hander. They presented it as a radio play, with the three performers gathered around a microphone in the centre of the stage.

The most explosive was a production in Musselburgh, a (then) mining community east of Edinburgh, during the 1984-5 strike. At the end, the local colliery band marched in and lined up behind the actors, banners flying, for Alex's final sardonic chorus: "It's only a story - a fanciful tale."

I took part in an onstage discussion after the show with NUM and community representatives. British Coal had promised a spokesperson - presumably one of Thatcher's lesser lackeys - but he didn't show up. It was a wise decision.

The show continues to be performed by amateur groups and schools - even once in a prison - wherever there's a mining tradition. A decade ago, when working at the Australian Film School in Sydney, I had a call from a campus in Newcastle, New South Wales, to say it was on their syllabus and would I come to talk to staff and students about it?

So far, so nostalgic. At this point, one of my lesser fantasies takes over. My desk has a visit from a royal personage who accepts the flowers and says: "One must have seen a great many changes while one has been writing one's plays." To which one says: "You bet, babe."

For a start, when we were casting the original show, it was difficult finding actors who would admit to being Geordies. Bolton-born Bryan Pringle qualified by having an Auntie Bella in Gateshead.

On the other hand, we were able to afford a bigger and better cast because the BBC threw some money (memory says it was £400) into the stage production in exchange for the television rights which, in those days, meant a single showing on The Wednesday Play. The tape was apparently wiped long ago.

T hirty years on, the Geordie accent is part of our national culture and, according to research, is universally trusted. Robson Green, Kevin Whateley, Jimmy Nail and Tim Healy are bankable lead actors in the eyes of television executives.

Consequently, casting the most recent revival at Newcastle's Live Theatre was easy, except in terms of economics. Most regional theatres have lived on the breadline since the 80s. The original production had a cast of 11, plus a five-band brass ensemble. The revival had a cast of eight brilliant and versatile performers who played their own instruments. Both productions had a brass band on special occasions. We didn't bother to ask whether anyone would be interested in a television version.

So much for luvvie talk. What about the subject - the pits, the pitmen and their communities? It's no state secret. Thatcher and her imported hitman, McGregor, set out to destroy them and succeeded. In the latest, and probably last, version of the play, there's a brief exchange among the characters about the 1984-5 strike.

"The best ever. Because it wasn't about money."

"But we lost, didn't we?"

"It's still too early to say."

The cute people in Whitehall who are doing their best to remove the politics from politics would love us to believe that there are no longer such things as the working class, union solidarity or folk memory. To be sure, something very profound happens to a region when there are more art galleries than shipyards on the Tyne, when mining is something that happens in heritage museums, when disused pits are turned into dry ski slopes.

The industrial revolution is apparently over and our show, originally written as a hymn of praise to the miners, is now an elegy for a lost world. Memory becomes history and history becomes legend. But politicians should take note: legends endure and have a habit of making mischief in the debating chamber while the focus groups are taking a decaffienated coffee break.

The updated version of Close the Coalhouse Door is published by Bloodaxe Books at £7.95.

RtS


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Subject: Lyr Add: A WILD UTOPIAN DREAM (Alex Glasgow)^^
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 16 May 01 - 08:23 AM

Found this while trawling for an obit.Not in the DT as far as I can see.

A Wild Utopian Dream
(Alex Glasgow )

Last night I dreamed a dream, a wild Utopian dream
The air was fresh and clean, the streets were white as cream
The river flowed so crystal clear
The cheerful children all appeared
And full of pride they gaily cried, Our lungs are free from fear
Our lungs are free from fear

Last night I dreamed a dream, a wild Utopian dream
The grass was freshand green, there were no slums to be seen
The dole queues had gone away
The workers worked a four-hour day
The foundries rang, the mill-girls sang like nightingales in May
Like nightingales in May

Last night I dreamed a dream, a wild Utopian dream
This morning I awoke to clouds of dirty smoke
The sparrows coughed their morning song
The slums were back, the queues were long
The dust lies deep, the trees all weep, oh send me back to sleep
And give me back my dream



(as sung by Iain MacKintosh)

RtS


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 16 May 01 - 08:54 AM

Obit "coming soon" here: Click Here

RtS


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 16 May 01 - 08:59 AM

THis is an old bio but may serve in lieu of aan obit. the page in my last post is for messages of appreciation, rather than an obit. I'll stop now and get back to work!

http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:9209e1cdbac55722:www.q-net.net.au/~ghosts/alex_glasgow.htm++%22Alex+Glasgow%22&hl=en
Or Click here

RtS


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY LOVE AND I (Alex Glasgow)^^
From: AndyG
Date: 16 May 01 - 10:20 AM

By way of a remembrance,
here's the only Alex Glasgow song I sing;

MY LOVE AND I

My love and I, we chose to read, a book which had been well reviewed,
And since the critics had all agreed we thought it might be rather rude,
Primitive, Passionate, mid flowing meadow grass,
The countryside cavortings of the suburban middle class,
And true to expectations it didn't take the author long,
They were bedded in the buttercups at the bottom of page one.

but:
When we tried to emulate to recreate this happy state;

I got earwigs in my navel, she got spiders in her hair,
The thistles prickled constantly, the cows turned up to stare,
The sun went in behind a cloud, the rain began to fall,
And I got stung, and what a sting, where you shouldn't get stung at all. - Oh!

My love and I, we sought advice, from certain weekly magazines,
They all supplied, fantastic guides, which promised wild erotic dreams,
There was rubberised euphoria with complicated schemes,
For ultimate fulfillment with helmets whips and creams,
The details were amazing and the pictures made us gasp,
We felt that satisfaction now was well within our grasp.

but:
When we tried to emulate to recreate this happy state;

In the doorway to the bedroom well my Prussian helmet stuck,
I'd mis-heard the invitation what she really said was duck,
We tried a Kama Sutra trick and landed in a heap,
And frankly after half an hour we laughed ourselves to sleep.

My love and I, we saw a film, a masterpiece the papers said,
So sensative and deeply felt and not a single scene in bed. - Instead,
They chose the midnight hour on a silent moonlit beach,
The bodies and the cellos reached a fine ecstatic pitch,
The camera panned to the winking, glistening wavelets on the shore,
And left my love and me still sighing, crying out for more.

but:
When we tried to emulate to recreate this happy state;

Well the temperature at midnight was perhaps a trifle cool,
And the North Sea tide had failed to clear a nearby stagnant pool,
We might have been successful yet but the sand got in the way,
Perhaps it's not the kind of thing designed for Whitley Bay.


Words:Alex Glasgow
Tune: Alex Glasgow

AndyG


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SOCIALIST ABC(Alex Glasgow)^^
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Nov 01 - 06:55 PM

There was a request for an Alex Glasgow song in another thread, so maybe it's time to refresh this thread and paste in these lyrics instead of just having a link.
-Joe Offer-



THE SOCIALIST ABC
(Alex Glasgow)

When that I was and a little, tiny boy,
Me daddy said to me,
'The time has come, me bonny, bonny bairn,
To learn your ABC.'

Now Daddy was a lodge chairman
In the coalfields of the time
And his ABC was different
From the Enid Blighton kind.

He sang, 'A is for Alienation
That made me the man that I am, and

B's for the Boss who's a Bastard,
A Bourgeois who don't give a damn.

C is for Capitalism,
The bosses' reactionary creed, and

D's for Dictatorship, laddie,
But the best proletarian breed.

E is for Exploitation
That workers have suffered so long, and

F is for old Ludwig Feuerbach,
The first one to say it was wrong.

G is all Gerrymanderers,
Like Lord Muck and Sir Whatsisname, and

H is the Hell that they'll go to
When the workers have kindled the flame.

I's for Imperialism,
And America's kind is the worst, and

J is for sweet Jingoism,
That the Tories all think of the first.

K is for good old Kier Hardy,
Who fought out the working class fight, and

L is for Vladimir Lenin,
Who showed him the left was all right.

M is of course for Karl Marx,
The daddy and the mommy of them all, and

N is for Nationalisation -
Without it we'd tumble and fall.

O is for Overproduction,
That capitalist economy brings, and

P is for all Private Property,
The greatest of all of the sins.

Q's for the Quid pro quo,
That we'll deal out so well and so soon, when

R for Revolution is shouted and
The Red Flag becomes the top tune.

S is for Sad Stalinism
That gave us all such a bad name, and

T is for Trotsky, the hero,
Who had to take all of the blame.

U's for the Union of Workers -
The Union will stand to the end, and

V is for Vodka, yes, Vodka,
The vun drink that vont bring the bends.

W's for all Willing Workers,
And that's where the memory fades,

For X, Y, and Zed,' my dear daddy said,
'Will be written on the street barricades.'

Now that I'm not a little tiny boy,
Me daddy says to me,
'Please try to forget those thing that I said,
Especially the ABC.'

For daddy is no longer a union man,
And he's had to change his plea.
His alphabet is different now,
Since they made him a Labour MP.


lyrics copied from this page (click)


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,DMcG
Date: 20 Nov 01 - 08:55 AM

On the Lord Shaftsbury/Lord Robens controversy: On the LP 'Now and Then' it is Lord Londonderry, which fits in with the verse. I posted those lyrics to a thread a few weeks back.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 20 Nov 01 - 10:36 AM

Having just re-discovered my copy of the original script I can confirm it is Lord Londonderry, who was a major land and coal owner in the North East at the back end of the 1800s. (this is the script for the 1968 performance which according to the notes was at "The Flora Robson Playhouse" in Jesmond not the Peoples Theatre which is further along the same road. The cast included Bryan Pringle, John Woodvine and Colin Douglas. oh yes and in a minor role as one of the "Village Children" yours truly *modest blush*)


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,DMcG
Date: 21 Nov 01 - 08:18 AM

Does your script include any information about where I could obtain a copy?


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 27 Nov 01 - 04:47 AM

DMcG

Sorry to be so long getting back to you But I seem to have mislaid this website for several days! :D

Anyhow My copy was Published By Eyre Methuen and has the ISBN 0 413 29910 4 and cost me the princely sum of 75p (about $1.10) I have checked the Methuen website but it is not presntly listed and so may well be out of print. You could try writing to Samuel French Playscripts as they may have sets for performances?

Can't help beyond that. Sorry again AWM


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 27 Nov 01 - 05:30 AM

Yes, French's may be your best bet as the Methuen ed is out of print. There is this recent edition which may be different (cut 'n' pasted from Amazon UK):
Close the Coalhouse Door Alan Plater Our Price: £7.95 Availability: Usually dispatched within 2-3 days Hardcover - 104 pages new edition (29 June, 2000) Bloodaxe Books; ISBN: 1852244895
RtS


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Apr 03 - 01:24 PM

can anyone tell me what happened to the actor john nightingale who played tom seaton in when the boat comes in in the 70s.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,jim
Date: 04 Apr 03 - 01:31 PM

when the boat comes in. any info on actors, where are they now


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 04 Apr 03 - 02:11 PM

James Bolan & Susan Jamieson among others, I'll have to get ny thinking cap on.
Giok


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 04 Apr 03 - 05:13 PM

I'd forgotten John Nightingale completely, un-named guest, and I don't know the answer. Haven't seen in him anything for years. (I'm assuming he was the coalminer son, rather than the doctor(?) son.)

I can help with guest Jim's query a little bit. Jack Ford, the wheeler-dealer, union rep and ultimately bootlegger, was indeed played by James Bolam. Bolam's wife Susan Jamison (note spelling) played Jessie Seaton. The put-upon matriarch of the Seaton family was played by Jean Heywood. Can't remember the character's first name.(Anyone know if she was Pat Heywood's sister?) Her husband was played by James Garbutt.

Folkies will be interested to note that the singer Isla St Clair (sp?) appeared in at least one series, maybe the last, as an aristocratic type. The only other actor I can remember being in it was Malcolm Terris, whose character was called Matt Headley. When we lived in Hamstead, Terris lived nearby and was often in the shops - I didn't know his name then, and still thought of him as Matt Headley, 20 years after the series! He was regularly in work and appearing on (UK) tv screens until the mid-90s, playing a chief constable among other parts. But again, not for a while now, I think.

Thread creep: Jean Heywood was later in a one-off BBC play about a school trip, along with Alun Armstrong and Elizabeth Estensen. Can anyone remember any more about that production?


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: alanabit
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 02:46 AM

Was it by any chance Willy Russell's "Our Day Out"? It may be worth a Google search for you...


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 10:44 AM

Thanks alanabit, that was it. I'll follow it up.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,bigJ
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 12:09 PM

'Our Day Out' for which Nic Jones played 'Teddy Bear's Picnic' as the theme.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 12:14 PM

GUEST - try a quick search on the Internet Movie Database www.imdb.com
John Nightingale seems to still be working as an actor with occasional film or TV credits.
Quack


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: BUTTERFLY
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 04:56 PM

"Bella" was the name of the character played by Jean Heywood. I often wonder whether the resemblance of Susan Jameson to the actress Louise Jameson (who played one of Dr. Who's assistants, and also the girlfriend of Jim Bergerac in the TV detective series) was a coincidence or due to familial relationship. I also often wondered what became of that fine actress who played a rather posh lady who became friends with Jack Ford (played by James Bolam; I think she was called Lois Baxter), until she definitely turned up on a TV program recently (whose name I cannot remember). I have also not noticed the actor (Edward Wilson) who played Billy Seaton, since the time of WTBCI (which I think ran from the mid-1970s), though I think I have seen Malcom Terris on TV once or twice since. In fact only James Bolam (who I last saw playing the TV part of the mass murderer of elderly ladies, Dr. Harold Shipman and more recently in a TV detective series whose name escapes me) seems to have appeared on TV regularly since, and he was of course a well established actor prior to this, though associated mainly with comedy, eg "The Likely Lads" and "Only When I Laugh". As they say if you do comedy you can do any acting (that is almost the only think I learned from a very brief spell in amateur dramatics, apart from the fact that I would never be an actor) perhaps it is surprising that Rodney Bewes, James Bolam's acting partner in the Likely Lads, didn't appear in "When the Boat Comes In".

Sorry about the long sentences - I must be subconsciously trying to emulate Bernard Levin. Sorry also to Mudcatters outside the UK as probably they will have heard of few if any of the characters mentioned here (except probably Harold Shipman, Britain's answer to Charles Manson/Jeffrey Dahmer, etc (actually he probably killed very many more).


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Loftus
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 04:46 PM

The song about the Jarrow Crusade of 1936 when 200 men marched to London was 'Gannin doon Geordie, gannin doon to the toon where the power lies'


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Subject: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,belfast (sans cookie)
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 11:33 AM

A commercial on TV today, advertising fish, had a snatch of Alex Glasgow singing "Dance to tha' daddy". The same singing that was used to introduce the serial drama on BBC TV"When The Boat Comes In." Then I noticed a drama, an autobiographical piece by Alan Plater, on today's BBC radio4 in which Alex Glasgow is a character. A little coincidence. If you're not acquainted with his work here's a obituary of him by Alan Plater.
Alex Glasgow:obit
If anybody else wants to provide a link to the programme, it's on this evening at 7.45.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 04:27 PM

The link appears to be THIS. The programes will be online for a week and then gone.
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Claire Whiting
Date: 17 Sep 05 - 02:00 PM

Can anyone help me I'm a teacher who's trying to find the lyrics to the Jarrow March song 'Gannin doon Geordie gannin doon to the land where tne power lies,' I'm writing a class assembly for children aged 10 and have spent far too long trying to research this.
Thanks


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Geoff the Duck
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 01:32 PM

GUEST,Claire Whiting

Just a piece of advice - yopu will probably get a better result for your query if you start a new thread with a specific title - Lyr Req:Gannin doon Geordie... - or something similar.

The query is likely to be lost within this very old thread.
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Dan Glasgow
Date: 07 Feb 06 - 08:20 AM

G'day,
very interesting to read your discussions people,brings tears to the eyes. . .the old man felt very depressed as his illness progressed as he felt he had "failed to make a difference" in his quest to change the world.He certainly made an impression on all of you and I'm sure that somewhere in his wild utopian socialist heaven he is very happy that you are still enjoying his work!!

Regards Dan


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Jonathan Rhodes
Date: 10 Apr 06 - 04:51 PM

As a teenage schoolboy in the North East, just mastering folk guitar, I spent hours perfecting the little catch that characterises the accompaniment of 'Close the Coalhouse Door' and I got into terrible trouble at my private school by performing, unannounced and un-rehearsed (at least in the hearing of the teacher in charge) 'The Socialist ABC' at a school end of term in-house concert!

Joy of Joys, I saw Alex and Henry Livings performing 'Northern Drift' at our local state school. My teachers were, by then, convinced that I was the local 'Red Under the Bed'!

Alex Glasgow`was a major influence on me both as a writer and, later, as a theatre director and actor. 'Close the Coalhouse Door' and 'The Day of the Sardine' are classics in their own right and 'The Tyne slides By' is nothing short of genius.

Alex Glasgow is sadly missed.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Paul Lane
Date: 11 Apr 06 - 02:32 PM

As a comparatively newcomer to the 'Folk Scene' I first heard of the great Alex Glasgow in the late 90's when I enquired of the BBC who the folk singer backing a partiucular programme was. They replied it was probably Alex. and after some searching around I found his address in Australia. I of course wrote to him there , but he was not able to help me with my immediarte enquiry, but he told me that he was returning to the UK to publicise his new CD. In due course he rang me at home and cordially invited my wife and I and our son and his wife to meet him at a little theatre on the Tyne riverside near enough. We duly arrived there, shook his hand and had some conversation with him, before he settled down with his many friends. We had a lovely meal in the interval and my only dissapointment was, that he himself did not sing, but a very accomplished vocalist performed his songs. The only recording I have of his voice, is on the 2 CD's I proudly own. I continued to write to him in Australia, till Paddy replied to say his health was very bad. I count it a great pleasuire to have met and talked to him, something that will stay with me for the rest of my life.
Paul Lane


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Paul Lane
Date: 11 Apr 06 - 05:17 PM

Further to my last entry, I think that the song, words and tune that I was, and still am looking for, were probably the following.
'Gannin doon Geordie, gannin doon to the toon where the power lies' As I remeber from the history programmes relating to the Jarrow Marchers.
If anyone can tell me where I could find the tune and words, I would be very grateful. As my grand-daughters live just north of the Tyne, one of Alex's songs that is a particular favourite of mine is "Waters of Tyne"
Thank you.
Paul.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Ruth Ling
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 10:54 PM

Re: what happened to John Nightingale? I knew him 34 years ago, when he was in Bill Hays' production of Close The Coalhouse Door at Leeds Playhouse, where I worked. Sadly, I heard some 30 years ago or so that John had died. Very young. A tragedy. He was a really lovely man as well as a great actor.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,GUEST,Stephen Tyley
Date: 10 Nov 08 - 06:55 PM

Alex Glasgow and Tom Paxton - two great folk singers from either side of the Atlantic, Tom mildly left of centre, Alex definitely an outside left! Was it co-incidence that both wrote amusing songs entitled 'My Dad's Bigger Than Your Dad'? Alex Glasgow's song is included in his 'Now and Then' album, while Tom Paxton's, focusing more on the child than the Dad, was one of his many children's songs. I think the Paxton song was the earlier by about 5 years - did the two men ever meet, and was there a collaboration?

If any other Paxton admirers read this, you may be interested to know that he will be doing another British tour this winter, including the Sage, Gateshead, which overlooks the River Tyne. Surely Alex,who wrote 'Any Minute Now', would be relieved to know that the once-coaly Tyne is finally a salmon river!


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 10 Nov 08 - 10:21 PM

I only really came across Alex glasgow as a member of a radio program on the Third program called The Northern drift. I was an exiled 17 year old Northerner at the time living in a Devon village with my parents.

Alex sang a song called 'My daddy is a Left wing Intellectual'. It was so urbane. So totally urban as well. really heady - working class people who weren't victims, they were like the wonderful characters that David Mercer and Dennis Potter were writing about on the TV - intelligent and substantial in their intellect.

Down at the local folk club. It was all shite - really. All these middle class lecturers from Exeter University were singing songs like they were merry ploughboys - or some such.

All these traddy gits still give me a load of shit and pain on mudcat. I owe it to people like Alex that I know better. You don't have to abandon your intelligence and sophistication when you become a folksinger.


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Subject: Lyr Add: TURNING THE CLOCK BACK (Alex Glasgow)
From: Mavis Enderby
Date: 03 Feb 09 - 07:17 AM

TURNING THE CLOCK BACK
(Alex Glasgow)

My granny tells me that she's seen it all before
And at 94 she's seen a thing or two
She's seen the stockbrokers all sighing
And the speculators crying
And the millionaires relying on a war to pull them through

And they're turning the clock back I can hear me granny say
Yes they're turning the clock back and the working man will pay

My Gran remembers the way it used to be
with Baldwin and MacDonald in the chair
She fetched the soup from down the kitchen
Heard the speeches
Saw men marching
Read how Churchill brought the troops in
Which the papers said was fair

And they're turning the clock back I can hear me granny say
Yes they're turning the clock back and the working man will pay

My granny tells me that they're at it once again
The nobs can't get their profit quite as high
And Tom and Dick and Harry
Have forgotten that they carry
On their shoulders all the parasites
That sucked their bodies dry

And they're turning the clock back I can hear me granny say
They may call it social contract but the working man will pay

My granny tells me that it's getting very late
And we've got our silly heads stuck in the sand
She says she has a nasty feeling
We may very soon be reeling
From the evil dealing jackboots
As the Blackshirts haunt the land

And they're turning the clock back I can hear me granny say
Yes they're turning the clock back and the working man will pay

BC


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Byker Lil
Date: 03 Dec 10 - 12:20 PM

Dear John Nightingale died in 1980 of a heart attack. A great loss.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Byker Lil
Date: 03 Dec 10 - 12:23 PM

I've also been trying to find the song about Eldon Square. It went:

Weep Geordie weep for the murder of your city
They are tearing ip its stones
Like a cat at a chicken's bones
And they're building concrete tombs.

can't find any other reference to it.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Treacle Bolly
Date: 03 Dec 10 - 03:03 PM

Thge only song of Alex's that comes to mind in relation to town planning is "Mary Baker City Mix". Maybe the verse above was a sort of coda for it ?


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: Leadfingers
Date: 03 Dec 10 - 07:18 PM

Back in the Good Old Days a friend of mine (From Co Durham) was somewhat upset to find Alex Glasgow albums in the 'Scottish' section of a certain well known Record supplier at a Festival !


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Dan Glasgow
Date: 22 Aug 11 - 11:23 PM

Don't think he met Tom Paxton, but he certainly listened to his LP's Steven.


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Subject: RE: Alex Glasgow
From: GUEST,Jez Lowe
Date: 06 Jul 13 - 12:15 PM

Trying to get in contact with you Dan. jez@jezlowe.com


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