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Lyr Req: Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins)

reg 17 Dec 97 - 10:13 PM
17 Dec 97 - 10:56 PM
Will 17 Dec 97 - 11:40 PM
dani 18 Dec 97 - 10:08 AM
Jon W. 18 Dec 97 - 10:55 AM
Bert 18 Dec 97 - 11:29 AM
Old Timer 18 Dec 97 - 11:35 AM
Joe Offer 18 Dec 97 - 12:26 PM
Jon W. 18 Dec 97 - 02:06 PM
Earl 18 Dec 97 - 02:20 PM
Bert 18 Dec 97 - 03:06 PM
Jon W. 18 Dec 97 - 05:44 PM
Nonie Rider 18 Dec 97 - 06:08 PM
Bert 19 Dec 97 - 11:12 AM
Frank in the swamps 19 Dec 97 - 11:34 AM
Bill D 19 Dec 97 - 12:24 PM
dick greenhaus 19 Dec 97 - 03:38 PM
Earl 19 Dec 97 - 05:17 PM
Barry 19 Dec 97 - 08:34 PM
chet w 19 Dec 97 - 10:14 PM
Bill D 19 Dec 97 - 10:48 PM
dick greenhaus 20 Dec 97 - 11:15 AM
Earl 20 Dec 97 - 11:44 AM
Bill D 20 Dec 97 - 03:38 PM
Selene 20 Dec 97 - 05:05 PM
chet w 20 Dec 97 - 09:18 PM
Earl 21 Dec 97 - 04:41 PM
Bill D 21 Dec 97 - 06:36 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 21 Dec 97 - 07:12 PM
chet w 21 Dec 97 - 07:26 PM
Earl 22 Dec 97 - 08:28 AM
Joe Offer 22 Dec 97 - 03:37 PM
j. rude 23 Dec 97 - 09:37 PM
chet w 23 Dec 97 - 11:05 PM
GUEST,A Roan 08 Nov 01 - 05:05 PM
GUEST 30 Jan 12 - 11:45 AM
Jim Dixon 24 Aug 16 - 05:55 PM
leeneia 25 Aug 16 - 12:10 AM
Roger the Skiffler 25 Aug 16 - 03:55 AM
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Subject: Blue Suede Shoes
From: reg
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:13 PM

I would like to get the song "Blue Suede Shoes" Carl Perkins or Elvis thanks --reg


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From:
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:56 PM

right.....some nice traditional folk music :-) ...um...we don't usually deal with Elvis, etc. in here, although some nice soul may take pity on you.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Will
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 11:40 PM

Cowpie has it (no pity, no nice soul, just simple information)

http://www.roughstock.com/cowpie/cowpie-songs/p/presley_elvis/blue_suede_shoes.pro


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: dani
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 10:08 AM

Well, it may not be traditional stuff, but this is a song with great and solemn meaning for me. Reading the thread about instruments made me really think about the voice as an instrument, and this was the first song I ever performed on a stage... in elementary school... with gusto. Uh Uh honey lay off-a my shoes.....

And another thought occurs to me - Arlo Guthrie tells a terrific story (I think you can hear it on the Precious Friend album) about an Elvis song at a folk festival in Europe, and what folk music 'really' is.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Jon W.
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 10:55 AM

In fact early rock'n'roll was in my humble opinion very much a form of folk music. It wasn't sung in the British Isles 200 years ago, but it arose from the grassroots level, went against the mainstream commercial music business, was certainly no guarantee of financial success, and was looked down upon by most people including/especially people who were playing and singing pure (read sanctimonious) folk music. And it's roots were in blues. I suppose that, along with it's relatively recent origin, the main reason that we don't consider it to be folk music is because of the technology of it's dissemination (recordings) which, along with copyrights and royalties, tended to preserve the originators of the song (the guy's names were on the record labels). But I remember the days when rock'n'roll was still ridiculed, even in MAD Magazine, and you never heard it in TV or movie soundtracks (let alone commercials). It wasn't until the late '60's/early '70's that people discovered you could make money off of it. That's when it ceased to be folk music.

Okay, Jon, take it easy big fella, get down offa that soapbox 'fore someone gets hurt.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bert
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 11:29 AM

Jon,
I agree with you that "Blue Suede Shoes" is Folk (Now)

But I thought that Rock started with Bill Hailey's "Rock Around the Clock". Which was a VERY COMMERCIAL rip off, in the Mid Fifties, of the Hank Williams song "Move it on Over" which was written in 1947.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Old Timer
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 11:35 AM

"No Name": We don't usually deal with Elvis here? Are you saying he never sang a folk song? It now matters WHO sang the song? My, My... I never.....

OT


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 12:26 PM

The Elvis song that Arlo Guthrie sang was "Can't Help Falling In Love with You." It's on the "More Together Again In Concert" album that Arlo did with Pete Seeger. I've been lobbying to get "Can't Help Falling" included in the new volume of the "Rise Up Singing" songbook, and I understand it's going to make it into the book. I was hoping my contribution to the book would be more purely "folk" than that, but I'm happy the song made the cut.
I'm still lobbying for "Star of County Down" and "Sonny's Dream."
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Jon W.
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 02:06 PM

I forgot to mention that rock'n'roll's other roots were country. Maybe "Rock Around The Clock" (which I still think is a great fun song) was the first big commercial hit that is now classified as rock'n'roll but Bill Haley didn't just wake up one morning playing the guitar and singing that way. I'm glad to hear about the Hank Williams song, I'll have to check it out sometime. But I prefer the term "folk process" to "rip-off." The physical process is the same but the intentions are a world apart.

Another rock and roll root is quartet singing from the African-American community in the '20s and '30s (or earlier?) I heard a song on the radio from that era that is virtually indistinguishable in style from the "do-wop" sound of the next generation, which was so important in the development of rock'n'roll. The same could be said about white bluegrass/gospel quartet singing, compared to say, surfer music.

I remain, Your humble and opinionated servant, Jon W.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Earl
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 02:20 PM

I wouldn't hesitate for a minute to call rockabilly a form of folk music. These were boys form Mississippi, Lousiana, and Tennessee playing the music they grew up with but combining it in new ways. Elvis' first single had a blues song on one side and a bluegrass song on the other. The fact that it grew into a commercial monster doesn't make the roots less authentic. It's certainly more authentic than most of the contemporary singer/songwriter crap using the name "folk."


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bert
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 03:06 PM

Jon,

I love opinionated people (especially me).

RE: ......But I prefer the term "folk process" to "rip-off."......
It's the "folk process" when I "borrow" a song and "rip-off." when someone else makes a commercial success without giving the original author a cut or even the credit.

Jon,

I agree with all that. especially the "singer/songwriter crap"

I'm a singer/songwriter myself but I don't try to pretend that anything that I write is "FOLK" 'cos it ain't. And I get really peeved when I go to a concert to hear folk music and get served up "s/s c"


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Jon W.
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 05:44 PM

Given your definition of rip-off, I agree. I always would want to give the original author his or her due. One of my personal definitions of "true" folk music is that no one knows who the original author really is. Unfortunately that rule breaks down pretty quick once we get past about 1850. So then you have to look at style, tradition, etc. Didn't we have a long thread on this about six months ago? And where's Elsie lately, anyway?


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Nonie Rider
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 06:08 PM

For me, "true" folk music tends to be stuff that was repeatedly passed by word of mouth, whatever its origins.

If you find a handed-down Appalachian ballad, complete with misheard but preserved burden and some odd interpolated phrasings, it's "folk" to me whether or not you can find its origin in a broadside somewhere.

After all, everything HAD an origin; somebody first created "Barbara Allen" whether or not we know who that somebody was. But with or without a creator's name, it's gone from hand to hand, and evolved and looped and sprawled. It's folk now.

I even feel the same way about kids' songs. I've only heard one set of lyrics to "On Top of Spaghetti," and therefore suspect it of not being truly "folk." But no matter what the origin of "Great Green Gobs of Greasy-Grimy Gopher Guts" may have been, it's evolved by word of mouth into hundreds of forms. Can you actually find anyone who didn't go to the same camp or school as you who learned the exact same lyrics? I can't.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bert
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 11:12 AM

Didn't Tom Glazer write "On Top of Spaghetti"?

He is one Great Folk Hero we don't hear enough of.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Frank in the swamps
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 11:34 AM

When I first came across the Mudcat, I thought it annoying that people would make requests such as the one that started this thread. It was about the time of "What is a folksong?" But after seeing some of the delicious conversations that spin off of the oddest questions, I'm much more open to what the Cats drag in. And just where is Elsie? I haven't seen her since that old thread mentioned above. Miss her,but it's good to see Shula back!


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 12:24 PM

I almost didn't even look at this thread, given MY personal type of opinionated soapboxing..*grin*..

"In fact early rock'n'roll was in my humble opinion very much a form of folk music" .....and

"I wouldn't hesitate for a minute to call rockabilly a form of folk music"

yep...and Taco Belle and McDonalds are a 'form' of food...but I avoid them as much as possible...It is certainly possible to demonstrate all sorts of links between various older music styles and some later styles...even Elvis and Rock...I simply wish that THIS site would not try to do justice to all of them. There SO few places one can go to get away from rockabilly, Elvis,bluegrass,singer-songwriter navel-gazing, etc. (I think I said much of this during the earlier discussions, but once more...I personally do not care much for what the music I like has metamorphosed into, and I really get frustrated when I hear arguments that 'it is all just music' or 'you can't define folk music') Sure I can!! I just have no power to make YOU agree with me! The lines are not clear & distinct, but if words are to mean anything, we can distinguish between what the Copper family sings and what Elvis sang...and MY 'humble' *grin* opinion is that we need to have at least ONE "Elvis Free Zone" to hide out in..doesn't mean that Elvis is good or bad, just that he should not automatically be part of every musical collection just because he was so pervasive for awhile.

(hey...I am filling in for Elsie pretty good, huh?) (I really AM smiling as I rant...but I really am serious, too..)


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 03:38 PM

Arguing about whether a piece of music id folk or not is like debating whether an elephant is an animal, a vertebrate, a mammal or an herbivore.

Folk, in most of its definitions, has absolutely nothing to do with good or bad. (write this on your banjo head 100 times)


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Earl
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 05:17 PM

Not to waste too much time pissing into the wind, Bill, but I'd like to know exactly where you would draw the line. The invention of the eletric guitar? the radio? the phonograph? the copyright laws? the colonization of America? the emergence from the cave?


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Barry
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 08:34 PM

Finding out where to draw the line on folk may be anywhere in the gray between black & white but if you're trying to tell me Elvis could be living there, then I think the Big Bopper's been spotted busking in the subways singing Some Enchanted Evening, or some kind of folk song like it. Barry


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: chet w
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 10:14 PM

Hey bill d. do you do baptisms?

Chet W.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Dec 97 - 10:48 PM

Earl...one does not 'exactly' draw the line...it simply cannot be done...my solution is to 'approach' a working definition and tolerate the borderline examples. No--that does not mean that anyone can mean anything they want. We might agree that "The False Knight On the Road " and "The Blue Tail Fly" are traditional folk music, while an operatic aria or a Heavy Metal song are not. The task then, is to figure out what is different...We DO have many categories of music out there. If someone says "sing me a country-western song" you know not to sing 'Frankie & Johnnie'. The country-western crowd would soon set you straight. But 'folk' is such a convenient word...it seems to be almost infinitly expandable and saves people the trouble of thinking of new catagories. But then you have all these offshoots and variations from musicians who intentionally set out to be 'different', that soon the word means nothing......and thus what Dick Greenhaus said becomes true...you simply cant discuss it if everyone can call anything they want to 'folk'.

I have sort of gotten away from 'folk' and use 'traditional' to describe what I prefer to listen to most of the time(as in the name of the Database)...but then you get "oh, it was MY tradition", or "we all used to sing it...it MUST be traditional".

Then you get those who say..."see...you can't define it, or make someone adhere to definition 'x', so lets just not worry about it and not make a fuss when someone asks for Elvis." So...why does the sign on the door say."A Magazine devoted to Blues and Folk Music"? It must mean SOMETHING!!I have been promising/threatening for months to write up in detail my approach and list of definitions by which one might be able to make some decisions...but it is not short or simple....you, Earl, alluded to two criteria....age, and mode of transmission...(phonograph...etc..) there are many more. I will once again TRY to get some of my ideas down on 'cyberpaper' and offer it up for dissection. .... (I hear those knowing clucks & whispers.."silly waste of time..")

*shrug*...you asked....It would be easier to just say "I aint never heard a horse sing", huh? Stay tuned...(a boy NEEDS a hobby)

(there was another loooonnnggg discussion like this many months back..you could search on my name, or on 'folk music' etc...if you really want to torture yourself..)


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 20 Dec 97 - 11:15 AM

Horses (or should I say Equine-Americans) need hobbies,too.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Earl
Date: 20 Dec 97 - 11:44 AM

I'm not among those who believe that anything not sung by a horse is a folk song. Elvis in Vegas is not folk. I think that now, with the dominance of mass media it is impossible for a legitimate folk tradition to thrive (as opposed to people like us singing folk songs from the past.) However, as late as the fifties there were grassroots regional styles developing in America, like rockabilly and Chicago blues which would fit any objective definition of folk music. The fact that they later became extremely popular is irrelevant. Two hundred years ago it would have been absurd to say a song was too popular to be folk. If rockabilly had not become popular it would have the same status today as other regional folk styles like Cajun and TexMex.

I do realize that there is no one definition of folk music. In a sense, we all know what we're talking about when we say "folk", it just breaks down at the edges. Mudcat would not be the first place I would look for information on rockabilly. It's hard to imagine, though, a definition of folk that would include, say, the Carter Family but exclude Carl Perkins.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bill D
Date: 20 Dec 97 - 03:38 PM

Dick...."A Horse Named Bill" , perhaps??..*wink*

Earl...oh, I could define it to exclude Carl Perkins...heck... with a little effort, I could exclude Pete Seeger...(But not all of Carl's or Pete's SONGS)...so many ways to approach it, which is why I don't approach it in a "this is IN" but "this is OUT" manner. I What I use personally is a form of asking--- does 'this' song done 'this' way, by 'this' person, with 'these' instruments, in 'this' version,etc., etc. seem to fit certain criteria.

I know...it all still sound muddy and awkward left partially explained....more later...


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Subject: On top of spaghetti, in reply to:
From: Selene
Date: 20 Dec 97 - 05:05 PM

Well, I know of at least two versions of On top of spaghetti, English (of course) and ..... Dutch. (that's probably why my spelling of spaghetti is wrong, its foreign)

Not that this is important, but I just thought I'd mention it.

Een bord met spaghetti, en daar boven op

etc

Selene


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: chet w
Date: 20 Dec 97 - 09:18 PM

I guess the question is, why do we need a definition? Trained, untrained, oral, written, rural, urban, acoustic, electric etc etc etc. It again becomes a political thing. If Saint Pete (Seeger), whom I admire greatly, did a song with exactly the same content as Blue Suede Shoes, we'd all trip over our Birkenstocks trying to rush to learn it. Definitions can be helpful, but they can also be meaningless, or even harmful. For example, there was a time when blues was undisputedly "folk" or even "country" music. Maybe if we still saw it that way there would be one less barrier to ethnic unity. Definitions are at their best when they serve as a rough guide, like Yahoo! At their worst they serve to exclude other people.

Chet W.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Earl
Date: 21 Dec 97 - 04:41 PM

Bill, Your situational approach sound pretty good but I'll bet it starts as many arguments as it settles. As for Blue Suede Shoes, I don't really think it's folk but I still contende that rockabilly is a folk genre (when played by country boys in 1954 :)

Chet, Your observation about blues being classified as folk or country reminds me of a record store I used to frequent in the 60's. Blues was considered folk so anything even remotely related to blues ended up in the folk bin. When "folk-rock" came along, anybody remotely related to that ended up in the folk bin unless they had a top forty hit. Cream, Hendrix, Zappa, The Fugs, Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead, were all considered folk.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Bill D
Date: 21 Dec 97 - 06:36 PM

Earl...and that is EXACTLY why I continue to stand on my soapbox...I too have tried to find music I liked in record stores which had no idea about 'useable' catagories! And I have gone to 'folk music' open mike nights at clubs, only to discover that it was 97% singer-songwriters trying to get attention. I need some way, somehow, to look at a label, sign, etc., and have SOME idea what is inside.

Chet..as much as I admire St. Pete, I certainly would NOT rush to learn Blue Suede Shoes from him...he has done MANY songs which I do not care to learn or listen to. And he has done songs which I would not consider folk/traditional , but which I DO like. He just sings songs and pays very little attention to trying to define or label them...which is fine, but he is St. Pete! And if he were to come near me and give a concert, I would go to it happily and shrug if everything he did was not 'exactly' folk. It would be fun anyway.......But if I am in a certain mood and indulging myself in a 'trad' day at my shelf of records, there are other things I would play.

My point is, if we had a usable defintion, EVERYONE would be better off...you or I ...or anyone else could still listen to anything they durned well pleased, in any combination, and AVOID things they DONT want to hear. There are WEB sites that specialize in Celtic...and Bluegrass... but there are songs from each that should be included in a 'trad' site like this, and songs that should NOT. ( I know...that is not ultimately my decision to make...all I can do is lobby). As it turns out, Dick Greenhaus puts MOSTLY folk/trad into the Database, and one way of approaching the 'what is 'folk/trad' would be to make a list extracting the common characteristics of the songs found there. In the discussion forum, anyone can post anything they like, whether they have paid any attention to those characteristics or not...and I do not beat my head on the wall trying to stop them.(It would be VERY sore by now if I did...*grin*). But occasionally , I like to stir things up a bit and at least keep people thinking about the issue.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 21 Dec 97 - 07:12 PM

I think there might be a back formation going on with the term "folk". One of the original interests in studying folk music was for the first-hand history and sociology they contained. The protest songs written in more modern times contain this same kind of history and have become recognized as folk songs.

Most of our music, be it classical or popular, derives from folk music of some kind. It almost seems like, when you produce a piece of music, you can decide yourself if it is folk or not.

If one wants to get technical, nothing Bob Dillan wrote, and little that Joan Biaz sang was music of th folk. Neither are most of the Leadbelly songs that have been remastered. They were all recorded and/or written by the artists to entertain an unknown mass market, consisting of people with nothing in common but the fact that the music apeals to them (and perhaps that they are willing to buy it). But if a folk station were to materialize that didn't play these things, boy would I complain!

By the way, I don't think many would consider Johnnie Ray songs to be "folk"; but a guy named Mickey Katz made Yiddish paradoxes of some of his songs in the '50s. I can't put my finger on it, but I somehow consider his stuff to be closer to folk music. Perhaps because it was done by a member of a subset of American culture to entertain other members of the subset. Like the blues sung by the blacks in the '20-30s, it was written to be appreciated by those who understood the argot and shared common experiences. It also made use of the musical styles of the subset (eg interspersed froelichs.)

Murray


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: chet w
Date: 21 Dec 97 - 07:26 PM

Fine discussion. All definitions break down. Woody Guthrie was a singer-songwriter. There was once a fine music festival in NC called Fiddler's Grove. It was set up as a contest, so that all the musicians on stage were competing for something (I think it was a plaque or such as that). If anybody got on stage with something as exotic as a mandola or a pennywhistle, their chances of placing, much less winning, dropped to zero. If there was any appreciable difference between what you played and the way Gid Tanner or Charlie Poole did it, it just didn't fit the management's idea of traditional. The wierd thing is that, in their time, Tanner and Poole were very innovative, incorporating all sorts of influences into their music. (Listen to Charlie Poole and his NC Ramblers records from the 20's/30's. There's just as much jazz as there is Appalachian Scotch/Irish in their music.) I agree that we should all have a place to go where they feel comfortable. The problem and ugliness comes in when you have to decide who not to let in.

Dedicated to open-mindedness, Chet W.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Earl
Date: 22 Dec 97 - 08:28 AM

I think the forum discussions here pretty much reflect what's in the DT database: a spectrum that runs from esoteric traditional to questionable pop. It's not pure but it's fun.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Dec 97 - 03:37 PM

We had this discussion way back in the early months of this forum, but there was a different tone - there was a lot of intolerance toward those of us who aren't quite as "pure" in our definition of folk music. I like the tone of this discussion a lot better. I like the humor, friendliness, and mutual respect that the entire forum has had for most of the last year. We've had very few flames since last winter, and that has been wonderful.
I guess my preference is for songs that people, especially groups of people, can sing over and over again. Although I've never been much of an Elvis fan, I'll admit that a good number of his songs fall into that category. Some of them have endured for 40 years now, and that's a good way along the route to achieving "traditional" status. On the other hand, there are a lot of "folk" singer-songwriter songs that NOBODY remembers, and few people other than the songwriter will sing those songs a year after they were recorded. I'd rather not listen to that ephemeral sort of music, but that's my taste.
Whatever the case, I'm sure glad that the flaming has been gone from this forum for so long. I think we're all here to enjoy ourselves, not to fight battles. Happy holidays, everyone!
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: j. rude
Date: 23 Dec 97 - 09:37 PM

blue suede shoes can only be considered a folk song if it performed properly.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: chet w
Date: 23 Dec 97 - 11:05 PM

Come on guys! I,too, have had trouble finding records, cd's, etc in the local record stores or the specialty catalogs for that matter, but you learn to look under new age for exotic ethnic music and under r&b for blues. It takes a little longer, but no big deal. I will say that one social trend I've noticed is that what we used to call country music, which has not much to do with what's on "country" radio these days, was once largely made by and for people with some connection to a rural, probably agricultural life. Not anymore, which probably explains why the label has changed meanings. But labels always change meanings. Arts have never been widely loved and respected except when they were fashionable. Mozart died broke and was supposedly buried in an unmarked grave. Musicians have always had to cater to audiences. It's a shame but that's the way it is. I think that we who love traditional or whatever-we-call-it music have never had it so good, at least in terms of what's available. Here we are, discussing real thoughts with people all over the world. In a sad world, some things are bright. And to all a good night.

Chet W.


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Subject: RE: Blue Suede Shoes
From: GUEST,A Roan
Date: 08 Nov 01 - 05:05 PM

Thanks for the words to Blue Suede Shoes. I agree with the author of message two; if somebody requests a song and you can direct the person to the lyrics just DO IT. Cut the crap.
I call the old songs "traditional", the singer-songwriters "contemporary folk". Someone pointed out above that the composed songs like trad songs carry messages about society.
Anyway, I LIKE Blue Suede Shoes and it has a good feel for jazz too.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins)
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jan 12 - 11:45 AM

Cool it guys ' n gals Folk songs or music is simply that
   Songs and or Music of the People, by the people and for the
   people?
                                     Thats all Folks,
                                                   James Molloy


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Subject: Lyr Add: BLUE SUEDE SHOES (Carl Perkins)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 24 Aug 16 - 05:55 PM

Funny that, in 1997, there was plenty of discussion, but nobody wanted to contaminate Mudcat's pages with actual lyrics that weren't pure "folk." And the one URL that was pasted no longer works. I'm happy to fix that. Here are the lyrics, personally verified and vouched for by me:


BLUE SUEDE SHOES
Words and music by Carl Perkins
As recorded by Carl Perkins, 1956.

Well, it's one for the money, two for the show,
Three to get ready, now, go, cat, go,
But don't you step on my blue suede shoes.
You can do anything, but lay off o' my blue suede shoes.

Well, you can knock me down, step in my face,
Slander my name all over the place,
And do anything that you want to do,
But uh-uh, honey, lay off o' my shoes,
And don't you step on my blue suede shoes.
You can do anything, but lay off o' my blue suede shoes.

Ah, let's go, cat!

You can burn my house, steal my car,
Drink my liquor from a ol' fruit jar,
And do anything that you want to do,
But uh-uh, honey, lay off o' them shoes,
And don't you step on my blue suede shoes.
You can do anything, but lay off o' my blue suede shoes.

Well, it's one for the money, two for the show,
Three to get ready, now, go, cat, go,
But don't you step on my blue suede shoes.
You can do anything, but lay off o' my blue suede shoes.

Well, it's blue, blue, blue suede shoes.
Blue, blue, blue suede shoes, yeah!
Blue, blue, blue suede shoes, baby!
You can do anything, but lay off o' my blue suede shoes.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins)
From: leeneia
Date: 25 Aug 16 - 12:10 AM

Jim, you always come through. Thanks


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins)
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 25 Aug 16 - 03:55 AM

It may not be blues but I've emptied many a room with this.
RtS


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Mudcat time: 25 September 11:43 PM EDT

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