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Lyr Req: The Jackets Green

In Mudcat MIDIs:
The Jackets Green [Michael Scanlan] (from The First Book of Irish Ballads (O'Keeffe/Healy))


Alice 12 May 98 - 09:37 AM
Antaine 12 May 98 - 05:10 PM
Alice 12 May 98 - 05:32 PM
Greycap 14 Aug 01 - 04:09 AM
pavane 14 Aug 01 - 05:18 AM
nutty 14 Aug 01 - 06:23 AM
pavane 14 Aug 01 - 06:46 AM
Wolfgang 14 Aug 01 - 06:57 AM
pavane 14 Aug 01 - 07:15 AM
Robby 14 Aug 01 - 08:34 AM
masato sakurai 14 Aug 01 - 08:43 AM
Malcolm Douglas 14 Aug 01 - 09:11 AM
pavane 14 Aug 01 - 10:38 AM
GUEST 14 Aug 01 - 10:38 AM
GUEST 14 Aug 01 - 10:39 AM
Big Tim 14 Aug 01 - 01:53 PM
Wolfgang 15 Aug 01 - 03:30 AM
Greycap 15 Aug 01 - 11:38 AM
Big Tim 15 Aug 01 - 01:31 PM
Jimmy C 15 Aug 01 - 02:00 PM
Joe Offer 16 Dec 03 - 02:40 PM
Lighter 28 May 17 - 03:29 PM
Thompson 28 May 17 - 11:02 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: JACKETS GREEN
From: Alice
Date: 12 May 98 - 09:37 AM

At the end of the "Where is Spancil Hill" thread, Big Mick requested the lyrics for 2 songs. One is 'Jackets Green'. A year ago, I had also requested complete lyrics to 'Jackets Green' on a Celtic music news group thread. The e-mailed response came from Frank Maher. The first verse and a few other words (learned from a Mary O'Hara recording) I sing a little differently than Frank's version. Here are both first verses, with a copy/paste of Frank's emailed version, and the different words here and there in parentheses.

When I was a maiden young and fair
On the pleasant banks of Lee
No bird that in the green wood sang
Was half so blithe and free.
My heart near beat with flying feet
The lark sang me his queen
When down through the glen rode Sarsfield's men
And they wore their jackets green.

Jackets Green

When I was a maiden fair and young, on the pleasant banks of Lee,
No bird that in the greenwood sung was half so blithe and free.
My heart ne'er beat with flying feet, no love sang me her queen,
Till down the glen rode Sarsfield's men, and they wore the jackets green.

Young Donel sat on his gallant grey like a king on a royal seat,
And my heart leapt out on his regal way, to worship at his feet.
Oh! Love, had you come in those colours dressed, and wooed with a soldier's mien,
I'd have laid my head on your throbbing breast for the sake of your jacket green.

No hoarded wealth (no property) did my love own, save the good sword that he bore,
But I loved him for himself alone, and the colours bright he wore;
For had he come in England's red, to make me England's queen,
I'd rove (I'd run to) the high green hills instead, for the sake of the Irish green.

When William stormed with shot and shell, at the walls of Garryowen,
In the breach of death my Donal fell, and he sleeps near the treaty stone;
That breach the foeman never crossed, while he swung his broadsword keen
But I do not weep my darling lost, (my Donal dead) for he fell in his jacket green.

When Sarsfield sailed away I wept as I heard the wild ochone,
I felt, then, dead as the men who slept 'neath the fields of Garryowen-
While Ireland held my Donel blessed, and no wild sea rolled between,
Till I would fold him to my breast, all robed in his Irish green.

My soul has sobbed like waves of woe, that sad o'er tombstones break,
For I buried my heart in his grave below, for his and for Ireland's sake.
And I cry, "Make way for the soldier's bride, in your halls of death, sad queen,"
For I long to rest by my true love's side, and wrapped in the folds of green.

I saw the Shannon's purple tide roll by the Irish town,
As I stood in the breach by Donal's side, when England's flag went down,
And now it glowers as it seeks the skies, like a blood-red curse between,
I weep, but 'tis not women's sighs that will raise the Irish green.

Oh! Ireland, sad is thy lonely soul, and loud beats the winter sea,
But sadder and higher the wild waves roll from the hearts that break for thee.
Yet grief shall come to our heartless foes, and their thrones in the dust be seen,
But Irish maids love none but those who wear the jackets green.
^^

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Subject: RE: Jackets Green
From: Antaine
Date: 12 May 98 - 05:10 PM

Version of this song (sung by John Sheridan) on C.D. entitled "Ballinasloe Fair" (Early Recordings of Irish Music in America) (c. 1920's) Label : Traditional Crossroads CD 4248 Address : PO Box 20320 Greeley Sq. Sta. New York, NY 10001-9992 U.S.A.

There's also some other great stuff on this C.D. like "Tommy Murphy was a soldier boy" by Dinny "Jimmy" Doyle and Larry Griffin.....Absolutely Great Crack!

All the best.


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Subject: RE: Jackets Green
From: Alice
Date: 12 May 98 - 05:32 PM

Thanks, Antaine.

alice


Messages from multiple threads combined. Messages below are from a new thread.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: The Jackets Green
From: Greycap
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 04:09 AM

The song contains the following lines: "and down the glen rode Sarsfield's men, and they wore their jackets green" Does anyone know the words, or preferably, where I might find the song on CD? Thanks from Ellie the Cats


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: pavane
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 05:18 AM

There is this song in the Bodleian Ballad Library
The boys with their jackets green
which looks similar


Down the glen rode the Fenianmen
And they wore their jackets green


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: nutty
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 06:23 AM

info is here ...... CELTIC LYRICS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: pavane
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 06:46 AM

Interesting. According to the notes on the web, Michael Scanlan, author of The Jackets Green, was born in 1836, which makes it unlikely that his song was written much before 1856, but the Bodley song slip, although undated, looks as if it may be earlier. Does anyone have more information?


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE JACKETS GREEN
From: Wolfgang
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 06:57 AM

Maybe I should add that the song lyrics are also in the forum at least twice, e.g. here, but don't show the 'harvested' sign (hint, hint).

Wolfgang

Thread #13020   Message #105405
Posted By: David Ingerson
16-Aug-99 - 12:58 AM
Thread Name: Wolfetones lyrics..
Subject: ADD: The Jackets Green (Michael Seanlan)

Here they are:

The Jackets Green
By Michael Seanlan
as printed in Irish Songs of Resistance
Ed. Patrick Galvin

When I was a maiden young and fair on the pleasant banks of the Lee
No bird that in the greenwood sang was half so blithe and free,
My heart neıer leapt to flying feet, though love sang me its Queen
Till down the glen rode Sarsfieldıs men, and they wore their Jackets Green.

Young Donal sat on his gallant grey like a king on a royal seat
And my heart leapt out on his regal way to worship at his feet;
O love had you come in those colours dressed and wooed with a soldierıs mien
Iıd have laid my head on your throbbing breast for the sake of your Jacket Green.

No hoarded wealth did my true love own save the good sword that he bore
But I loved him for himself alone and the colours that he wore,
For had he come in Englandıs red to make me Englandıs Queen
Iıd have roved the high green hills instead for the sake of his Jacket Green.

When William stormed with shot and shell at the walls of Garryowen
In the breach of death my Donal fell and he sleeps near the Treaty Stone,
That breach the foeman never crossed while he swung his broadsword keen
But I do not weep my darling lost for he fell ıneath the Flag of Green.

When Sarsfield sailed away I wept as I heard the wild ochone,
I felt then dead as the men who slept Œneath the walls of Garryowen,
While Ireland held my Donal blest no wild seas rolled between,
I still could fold him to my breast all robed in his Jacket Green.

O Ireland, sad on they lonely soul there breaks the winter sea,
But sadder and higher the wild waves roll from the hearts that break for thee,
Yet grief shall come to thy heartless foes, and their thrones in the dust be seen,
So Irish maids love none but those who wear the Jacket Green.


Hope you enjoy singing it.

^^

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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: pavane
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 07:15 AM

Perhaps we should correct the name of the author (assuming it has been correctly attributed - see above) from Seanlan to Scanlan as well!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Robby
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 08:34 AM

In addition to the song linked to the Bodleian Library by pavane, I have found at least six other frames in that Library with the lyrics substantially as found in the link to the CELTIC LYRICS provided by nutty. I could not find any dates of publication for those entries. The significance of this I leave to others to debate.

However, if my recollection of history is correct, Sarsfield was one of the leaders of the Uprisings of 1798, and that he fled Ireland after the defeat of the Irish. The Fenian Uprising, on the other hand, did not occur until about 1867. This would suggest that the song the lyrics to which pavane found in the Bodleian library, which reference the Fenian men is not necessarily earlier in time than the song attributed to Michael Scanlan.

Robby


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: masato sakurai
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 08:43 AM

On these lyrics pages (here and here ) too, the name is "Michael Scanlan." But no mention of the author's name is here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 09:11 AM

The broadside copy Pavane pointed to was from J.F. Nugent of Dublin, dated "between 1850 and 1899"; the most specifically-dated copies are from Brereton of Dublin, and are dated c. 1867, which is consistent with Scanlan's dates (variously given as 1833 and 1836-1900).  The Brereton sheets, (two issues; several copies of each) for example  The jacket green  give the Scanlan text; there is another issue perhaps also from Nugent, but the image links are broken so I can't tell which text was used.

As to the background of the alternate text, I have no idea; presumably one derives from the other, but it must fall to more informed people than we to take that further.  To my untrained eye, I see no visual evidence to suggest that the Nugent broadside is older than the others.

As Wolfgang says, the lyric has been posted here twice, and is easily found via the "Digitrad and Forum Search".  The other posting is above.  There is also a brief biog. of Scanlan in this thread:  Biography; Michael Scanlan (Scanlon).

Daniel D. O'Keefe gives the tune in The First Book of Irish Ballads (Mercier, 1968); on the face of it it appears to be a Caroline of Edinburgh Town variant, but I'll not swear to it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: pavane
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 10:38 AM

(I did find the other copies, but didn't think I needed to post all of them)

So we have no evidence that the song was NOT by Scanlan, as claimed, as the dates seem feasible. Just thought it was worth checking if possible.

Was the term Fenian Men in use before the 1867 uprising? If not, then the Nugent copy is later than that. And why would the name Sarsfield be replaced by a generic term?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 10:38 AM

Patrick Sarsfield was a leader during the 1690's war between William of Orange and his father in law James II. James was defeated at the battle of the Boyne on July 1st 1690, he left Ireland 3 days later. That same year Patrick Sarsfield and his men attacked the Wiliamite Siege train in a cavalry raid near Limerick. In 1691 after the battle of Aughrim, General Ginkel's Williamite army defeated the French and Irish forces and the city of Limerick was surrounded by Williamites and besieged 25 August - 25 September. The Treaty of Limerick is signed allowing the defeated supporters of James II to leave Ireland. Sarsfield and other Irish Officers departed for France, later becoming known as the flight of the Wild Geese. In 1693 Patrick Sarsfield died after being wounded at the battle of Landen. The treaty stone still stands in Limerick City as part fo a monument to the period.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 10:39 AM

The above guest is myself " Jimmy C" - my cookie needs reset.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Big Tim
Date: 14 Aug 01 - 01:53 PM

As the "author" of Malcolm's "Scanlan Biography" Thread I would just like to say that most books give his year of death as 1900. HOWEVER, since then I have discovered that the National Library of Ireland gives it as 1917, very interesting as it means this patriot would have lived to see the 1916 Rebellion, a subject dear to his rebel heart. I have never seen "Jackets" attributed to anyone else, it's Scanlan's song! His year of birth is also uncertain, being either 1834 or 36. He emigrated to USA at about age 14.

The term "Fenian" (derived from "Fianna", Finn MacCool's mythical warrior band)was used by the United Irishmen in the 1790s ( I can prove this). And of course the term also predates the 1867 rebellion, as the Irish Republican Brotherhood (Fenian Movement) was founded in 1858. Modern political use of "Fenian" is usually attributed to John O'Mahoney (1816-77), a veteran of the 1848 rebellion, and an uncle of major Fenian leader Charles Joseph Kickham.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Wolfgang
Date: 15 Aug 01 - 03:30 AM

Sarsfield's Limerick raid (GUEST) Jimmy C has mentioned is described in (poetic) detail in the song Ballyneety's walls.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Greycap
Date: 15 Aug 01 - 11:38 AM

Many thanks for the Jackets Green. I used to sing it some time ago and almost forgot the words. I shall look forward to renewing my acquaintance with this great song Ellie the Cats


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Big Tim
Date: 15 Aug 01 - 01:31 PM

To digress slightly re "Ballyneety's Walls", a great, rousing song. Does anyone have any info on its origins.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Jimmy C
Date: 15 Aug 01 - 02:00 PM

Tim, I am not sure where the song came from.
I used to have a song called " The Song of Galloping Hogan",
Hogan was one of Sarsfield's Officer's who took part in the raid. I will look for it - there may be something there ?.

Jimmy


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Subject: RE: Jackets Green
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Dec 03 - 02:40 PM

The Traditional Ballad Index has an entry on this song.
-Joe Offer-

Jackets Green, The

DESCRIPTION: "When I was a maiden young and fair on the pleasant banks of the Lee," the girl loved young Donal in his jacket green. Donal serves under Sarsfield in the fight against the English and is slain. The singer urges Irish women to love only Irish patriots
AUTHOR: Michael Seanlan
EARLIEST DATE: 1928 (for USBallinsloeFair, according to site irishtune.info, Irish Traditional Music Tune Index: Alan Ng's Tunography, ref. Ng #2612)
KEYWORDS: Ireland rebellion battle
HISTORICAL REFERENCES:
1690 - Battle of the Boyne. William III crushes the Irish army of James, at once securing his throne and the rule of Ireland
FOUND IN:
REFERENCES (2 citations):
PGalvin, pp. 97-98, "The Jackets Green" (1 text, 1 tune)
Healy-OISBv2, pp. 38-39, "The Jacket Green" (1 text, tune on pp. 20-21)

Roud #9520
RECORDINGS:
John Sheridan, "The Jackets Green" (on USBallinsloeFair)
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Johnson Ballads 3214, "The Jacket Green," P. Brereton (Dublin), c.1867; also 2806 c.7(38)[some words illegible], "The Jacket Green"
LOCSinging, as106510[barely legible], "The Jacket Green," unknown, 19C

NOTES: Patrick Sarsfield, made Earl of Lucan by James II, was one of the Irish cavalry commanders.
After Aughrim (for which see "After Aughrim's Great Disaster"), he defended Limerick, but seeing that his cause was hopeless, he made a treaty with William III and surrendered. (This was not a betrayal of the Irish cause; Sarsfield gained significant concessions, including religious tolerance, in return for ending Irish resistance.) - RBW
Broadside LOCSinging as106510 looks like the Bodleian Brereton broadsides but all are difficult to read. - BS
File: PGa097

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Lighter
Date: 28 May 17 - 03:29 PM

The familiar tune (as sung, for example, by Mary O'Hara) is none other than "Renardine" in William Forde's "100 Irish Airs" (ca1841), vol. 3 of his "300 National Melodies of the British Isles."

And, slowed down, a great tune it is for that ballad.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Jackets Green
From: Thompson
Date: 28 May 17 - 11:02 PM

The common Irish phrase "down the glen", meaning "doomed" or "lost to hope" comes from this song; it's sometimes abbreviated to "jackets green".

Virtually all of the Wild Geese, as the Irish officers Sarsfield led to France on 22 December 1691 were afterwards called (reputedly because they were listed as a cargo of wild geese by the captain of one of the ships that carried them) were dead within two years; they were eagerly accepted into various European armies where they became cannon-fodder, fighting desperately and hopelessly. When the young Sarsfield was dying of wounds sustained in the Battle of Landen two years later, he is said to have dabbled his hands in the blood pouring from him with the words "Would that this blood were shed for Ireland".

They had left as a condition of the Treaty of Limerick, whose other agreements were immediately broken by the English.


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