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pentatonic songs

Related thread:
Help: Pentatonic Tunes (60)


Thomas Robertson 02 Mar 98 - 12:55 AM
dick greenhaus 02 Mar 98 - 01:12 AM
Bruce Olson 02 Mar 98 - 11:30 AM
John in Brisbane 02 Mar 98 - 08:06 PM
petur 05 Mar 98 - 01:19 PM
Alex 06 Mar 98 - 02:30 AM
Bruce O. 06 Mar 98 - 11:56 AM
Alex 08 Mar 98 - 12:11 AM
Bruce O. 08 Mar 98 - 11:44 AM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 09 Mar 98 - 06:46 PM
Paul Stamler 10 Mar 98 - 01:51 PM
D Terrell 01 Apr 98 - 11:46 AM
Alan of Australia 01 Apr 98 - 07:01 PM
John in Brisbane 28 Sep 98 - 02:55 AM
Chet W. 28 Sep 98 - 12:46 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 29 Sep 98 - 07:53 AM
John in Brisbane 30 Sep 98 - 07:57 PM
Art Thieme 06 Oct 98 - 04:25 PM
Jerry Friedman 06 Oct 98 - 06:25 PM
John in Brisbane 06 Oct 98 - 09:21 PM
Sophie 07 Oct 98 - 08:33 AM
bluesdogg 07 Oct 98 - 10:27 AM
John in Brisbane 26 Sep 00 - 09:08 PM
rabbitrunning 26 Sep 00 - 10:55 PM
Kim C 27 Sep 00 - 09:51 AM
Tinker 27 Sep 00 - 11:05 AM
Burke 27 Sep 00 - 12:18 PM
M.Ted 27 Sep 00 - 03:52 PM
gaelicconquest 24 Jun 01 - 07:44 PM
GUEST,Callie 24 Jun 01 - 08:05 PM
hesperis 24 Jun 01 - 08:41 PM
GUEST,CraigS 24 Jun 01 - 09:42 PM
GUEST,leeneia 24 Jun 01 - 11:36 PM
hesperis 25 Jun 01 - 02:15 AM
Wilfried Schaum 25 Jun 01 - 03:49 AM
JulieF 25 Jun 01 - 11:47 AM
chip a 25 Jun 01 - 12:32 PM
Burke 25 Jun 01 - 12:52 PM
hesperis 25 Jun 01 - 02:22 PM
ollaimh 25 Jun 01 - 07:45 PM
Mark Cohen 25 Jun 01 - 08:09 PM
GUEST,SharonA 26 Jun 01 - 12:07 PM
chip a 26 Jun 01 - 12:15 PM
Burke 26 Jun 01 - 12:21 PM
GUEST,Thomas Robertson 26 Nov 10 - 02:20 PM
Jack Campin 26 Nov 10 - 02:57 PM
Jack Campin 26 Nov 10 - 03:40 PM
GUEST,Timsan 19 Jul 11 - 10:16 PM
Jack Campin 20 Jul 11 - 09:15 AM
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Subject: pentatonic songs
From: Thomas Robertson
Date: 02 Mar 98 - 12:55 AM

Does anyone have any pentatonic songs or tunes (using only do, re, mi, so, and la)? If so, let me know and I'll give you a link on my PENTATONIC MUSIC COLLECTION at http://funnelweb.utcc.utk.edu/~thomasr

I'm Thomas Robertson and my address is thomasr@utkux1.utk.edu


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 02 Mar 98 - 01:12 AM

You mean like Swing Low, Sweet Chariot? and Loch Lomond? and virtually all Scots pipe tunes?


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Bruce Olson
Date: 02 Mar 98 - 11:30 AM

There are several Irish ones in Herrmann and Huntington's 'Sam Henry's Songs of the People'. Go to the modes table at the back of the book tp find them. Two pentatonic modes were more popular in this book than normal minor mode, which in popularity is also after major, mixolydian, dorian and one or two hexatonics. Scots are noted for pentatonic tunes, but I don't know of any list of them.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 02 Mar 98 - 08:06 PM

Without resorting to the puns in the Wonderbra thread, one of the things about music is that what you leave out is just as important as what you put in.

Having recently attended a blues guitar workshop (and a blues guitarist I'm not) my memory is that the blues scale was (roughly) pentatonic, even though that word was never used. The runs we were playing didn't sound like Scotland the Brave. Is my memory correct about the blues scale?

And to a more practical question - let's say I have a MIDI or ABC file and I want to hear how it might sound played as pentatonic. Without any real knowledge I imagine that I could suppress any of the irrelevant notes, or I could play the pentatonic note which preceded it. Anyone know how this could be done (easily)?

Regards John


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: petur
Date: 05 Mar 98 - 01:19 PM

Pentatonic songs or singing in pentatonic is known to be ancient Icelandic way of singing folk songs.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Alex
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 02:30 AM

I believe the main reason that lots of celtic tunes are pentatonic is that the bagpipe only has 5 notes in its scale. The more recent harp and fiddle tunes are written on the modern major and minor (8-note) scales.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Bruce O.
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 11:56 AM

That wouldn't account for Airs (song tunes).


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Alex
Date: 08 Mar 98 - 12:11 AM

Airs are different because they were mostly sung a cappella in any key or mode the singer wanted. Musical instruments were something of a luxury back in those days. The "muckle sangs" or old ballads were by their form and repeated second and fourth lines and choruses obviously meant to encourage the audience to join in. Where words were put to existing tunes taken from the bagpipe repertoire, you end up with a lot of pentatonic songs. Also the pitch of the drones on the highland bagpipe fit in with the pentatonic scale. Other notes on the regular 8-note octave tend to make a dischord. (Although some would say, on the bagpipe, how could you tell?)


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Bruce O.
Date: 08 Mar 98 - 11:44 AM

The thread started as one on songs. Are we going to get into that old arguement about which came first, the song or the tune?


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 09 Mar 98 - 06:46 PM

Since Thomas never answered the question posed by Dick about what he means by Penatonic Music, I took a look at the site me mentions.

It is based upon the fact that pentatonic music removes some of the technical difficulties for students learning music. Thus I think all of the types of music mentioned on this thread are candidates to bring to his attention.

I recently noticed, while cleaning the keys of my Clavicord, that the first line of "Keep On the Sunny Side" is pentatonic--it can be played with only the black keys. (They are now the cleanest keys on the instrument.) That is the Chinese pentatonic scale, but it doesn't seem to be the same one as Thomas gives. (It is a 'blue' version of it in that the third interval is diminished :)

John, I had a look at my anthology of slave songs and they aren't pentatonic. I don't think things derived from them would be. Certainly more modern blues (a la Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, etc) are not pentatonic.) I don't have any sheet music, for, and I don't have a good enough ear, to tell if Blind Lemon and those guys are using a pentatonic scale, but I don't think so.

You can, with a MIDI editor, knock out notes and move notes around in a MIDI file. It's easy but tedious. It offers hours of fun if you have harmony. I don't think the result will sound like blues, though.

Murray


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Paul Stamler
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 01:51 PM

The "Souling Song" recorded by the Watersons (and popularized in a "modernized" version by PP&M) goes pentatonic songs two better: it only contains three notes. If sung in the key of C, these would be C, D and Eb. (The song begins, "A soul, a soul, a soul-cake/Please, good missis, a soul-cake/Apple, a pear, a plum or a cherry/Any good thing to make us merry/One for Peter, two for Paul/Three for him that made us all".) It can be found on the Watersons' excellent recording of seasonal and ritual songs, "Frost and Fire" (Topic, now augmented with some shape-note songs from another recording.)
Peace. Paul


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: D Terrell
Date: 01 Apr 98 - 11:46 AM

Londonderry Air & Rosin' the Beau are both Pentatonic


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 01 Apr 98 - 07:01 PM

G'day,
So are "Ye Banks And Braes" (Burns) and "Nottamun Town" (and therefore Dylan's "Masters of War"). I understand that many tunes from the Southern Appalachian area are pentatonic.

Pythagoras (who first realized that the squaw on the hippopotamus' hide was equal to the squaws on the other two hides) was also (possibly) the first to express music in mathematical terms (by noting that the frequency or pitch of one note is 9/8 that of the next etc. and that an octave is a doubling of frequency. He also described the intervals of a third and fifth). It appeared to me when I read about this many years ago that he described a pentatonic scale, i.e. none of the intervals he described were semitones (15/16 ).

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 28 Sep 98 - 02:55 AM

Blues players may find this extract of interest.

The blues scale is often the first scale, after the major scale, taught to beginning improvisers, and is in some cases the only other scale they ever learn. This scale supposedly has its roots in African American music dating back to the days of slavery, but the exact origins of its modern incarnation are unknown. The C blues scale consists of "C, Eb, F, F#, G, Bb". The second degree of this scale, which is the flatted third of the minor scale, is called a blue note. In vocal music, it is often sung somewhere between an Eb and an E. In instrumental music, various techniques are employed to achieve the same effect, such as stretching the string while playing an Eb on a stringed instrument, lipping down an E on a wind instrument, or striking both the Eb and E simultaneously on a keyboard instrument. The flatted seventh and fifth are also sometimes called blue notes, and are not always sung or played exactly on the notated pitch. Variations on the blues scale that include the natural third, fifth, or seventh can be used as well. Also, note that if the flatted fifth is omitted, the resultant scale is the minor pentatonic scale. The minor pentatonic scale can thus be used as a substitute for the blues scale, and vice versa.

I found this at http://www.outsideshore.com/primer/primer/ms-primer-4-6.html. The author is Marc Sabatella from a book titled Jazz Improvisation Primer.

Regards
John


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Chet W.
Date: 28 Sep 98 - 12:46 PM

Here's a fun little exercise for players. Learn the basic blues scale as noted above. Then, if you can recall it, try the old tune from the sixties (and later 80's) hit "sukiyaki", which is written in an Asian pentatonic scale. You'll find that you use the same notes, only with the root in a different place.

Chet W.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 29 Sep 98 - 07:53 AM

That site you give is a very interesting one, John. (And a jazz boof sounds like it would be fun to attend ;)

Murray


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 07:57 PM

Yes Murray, I didn't spend much time there, but I was doing a search on 'Mixolydian' - something which millions of people must do daily around this planet. I think I might start a new thread on this aspect.

I an very indebted to the Mudcatter who suggested a fine (free) spell checker for use in this environment. It's a beauty, but I suspect that I didn't use it in my earlier response. As for that marvellous Aussie insult "boof head", I wonder where else in the world this appears.

Regards
John


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 04:25 PM

Edgar Burgen, the ventriloquist, used to sing nothing but pentatonic songs to practice his craft---his art---whatever you want to call it. This way he learned to sing without even twitching a single muscle in his entire body! And that was quite difficult. Not only that---he could sing 6 complete octaves but only using the pentatonic scale---or so I've been told. In later years he got very sloppy and always moved his mouth because doing a ventriloquist act on the RADIO somehow defeats the purpose of being a ventriloquist in the first place. Some even felt it was Mortimer Snurd who was the ventriloquist and Edgar was the dummy.

Whoops!!! I'm completely WRONG! It wasn't a pentatonic scale he used to practice his art.

It was the C A T A T O N I C scale!!! That's why he never moved!

Oh well, NEVER MIND!

Art


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 06:25 PM

The "Londonderry Air" is definitely not pentatonic. It might be hexatonic--I can't remember whether it contains the fourth degree of the scale.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 09:21 PM

Art. Come in spinner! I got sucked in.

Cheers
John


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Sophie
Date: 07 Oct 98 - 08:33 AM

Not 100% sure, but I think that good old lovely song "Star Of the County Down is pentatonic. Sophie


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: bluesdogg
Date: 07 Oct 98 - 10:27 AM

The blues scale is more minor then pentatonic. heres the pentatonice scale in the key of C C D E G A C BLUES SCALE in key of C C Eb F Gb G Bb C MINOR SCALE key C C D Eb F G Ab Bb C it is easy to see the blues scale is more minor then pentatonic, The blues scale gets most of its notes from the minor scale. The only note that doesn't come from the minor scale is the flat-5. The flat-5, along with the flat-3 and flat-7, are call blue notes. Blue notes are simply notes that are known to have a bluesy sounding quality to them. In short, if you want to sound blusy, you play alot of blue notes. If you play pentatonic scales it will sound like country music or folk the pentatonic scale is what gives folk and country the sound it has.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 26 Sep 00 - 09:08 PM

Some year or two ago the author of a pentatonic web site made a request at this Forum for Pentatonic songs. I can't locate this thread but just for posperity here's a modest list I compiled from a couple of books on the subject. Regards, John

PENTATONIC SONG BOOK (VOLUME 1)
Brian Brocklehurst

Birds' courting song
Cindy
Git along, little dogies
Hoosen Johnny
Mister Frog's wedding
Night herding song
Old brass wagon
Old Dan Tucker
Old lady sittin' in the dining room
Old Texas
On a long summer day
Poor wayfaring stranger
Sailing at high tide
Sourwood Mountain
The Lone star trail
The mocking bird song
The swapping song
Turn the glasses over
By the clear running fountain
(A la claire fontaine)
Canaday-i-o
Keep the ball a-rolling
(En roulant ma boule)
Land of the silver birch
The Derby ram
With care I tend my rosebush
(A ma main droit j'ai un rosier)
The shepherdess
(Il etait un bergere)
My bonny cuckoo
Deep river
De gospel train
Didn't my Lord deliver Daniel?
Ezekiel saw de wheel
Go to sleepy
I got a robe
I know de Lord's laid his hands on me
Little David
Liza Jane
Nobody knows the trouble I've seen
One more river
Steal away
Swing low, sweet chariot
Who's dat yonder?
Auld lang syne
Glenlogie
Leezie Lindsay
Row weel, my boatie, row weel
The auld hoose
The border widow's lament
The standard on the braes o' mar
Wha wadna fight for Charlie?
Ye banks and braes
Cap Cod chanty
Johnny come down to Hilo
Leave her Johnny
Tom's gone to Hilo
At evening
Duck dance
Indian game song
Chimes at night
Fengyang drum
Down the course of years
Lotus blossoms
Sore is my heart
Song of the Gurkha boys
Japanese lullaby
Ahrirang
Blue-bells
Round: Derry ding ding dason
Round: Lady, come down and see

VOLUME TWO

Alister MacAlpine's lament
All night, all day
Buck-eyed Jim
Buffalo boy
California
Ducks in the millpond
Every time I feel the spirit
Fiddle-de-de
Go tell it on the mountain
Goodbye, Old Paint
Hanging Johnny
Hullabaloo Balay
I believe this is Jesus
I want to be ready
It rains and it hails
It's me O Lord
Jennie Jenkins
Jim along Josie
John Henry
King Herod and the cock
Love's ritornella
Lullaby
Mary had a baby
Mister Rabbit
Night doth on the river fall
O bury me not on the lone prairie
O by and by
O Willie's gone to Melville Castle
One morning in May
Perry merry dictum dominee
Poor old maid
Sacramento
Skye Boat Song
Soldier, soldier
Some love coffee
The barnyard song
The cherry tree carol
The little pig
The miller
The old gray mare
The penniless wooer
The poor and the rich
The real old mountain dew
The returned sailor
The riddle song
The Sally Buck
The young man who wouldn't hoe corn
There was a jolly miller
There was a May lived in yon glen
There's a little wheel
Way low down
Where O where is old Elijah?
Who killed Cock Robin?
Yonder mountain


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: rabbitrunning
Date: 26 Sep 00 - 10:55 PM

Well, you can play "Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater" on just the black keys of a piano. And "Black Sheep Black Sheep Where's Your Little Lamb". And a song I learned from the Chipmunks (yes, Alvin) that went

May we have a a Japanese banana
That would be so very nice.
May we have a Japanese banana
Rather than cherries and rice.

CD


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Kim C
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 09:51 AM

Shady Grove? Old Joe Clark?


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Tinker
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 11:05 AM

Waldorf Education uses Pentatonic Scales for early childhood education. The suggested first instrument is a Pentaonic Harp. ( See one at the Fairywood Site--www.waldorf.w2w.cc-- click on wooden toys. )
The Waldorf School Association of Ontario has a variety of songbooks for sale&/or loan (www.waldorf.ca/)
They are simple songs to use on the lap harp and deal with everyday life, the seasons, Saints, and Nature.
Always makes me wish I wasn't instrumentally challenged.
I've never found a cassette or midi file of the music. Anyone know where it can be found?
Tinker


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Burke
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 12:18 PM

There's always New Britain aka Amazing Grace.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: M.Ted
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 03:52 PM

Pentatonic scales have five and only five notes--but that is not the only defining element. Pentatonic melodies don't shift to dominant harmony, which is to say that they don't have any notes in them that require a chord change, so you don't feel that intuitive chord shift(though it is possible to use diatonic chord changes in a pentatonic melody, you just don't have to)--

I have commented on Blues before, and my opinion(which doesn't count for much around here, I know) is that it isn't pentatonic--when you play a twelve bar blues, you actually use more notes than are in a diatonic scale-that said, which ought to rule it out. However, you can use a pentatonic scale to play over a blues progression (In again) but you can also play note that are not in the pentanic scale (out). I also refuse to believe that any scale that include the 4th, the b5, and the 5th, is pentatonic.

If you suspect that a melody is pentatonic, try to play it on the black keys(as mentioned above)--if you can't. it isn't--


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: gaelicconquest
Date: 24 Jun 01 - 07:44 PM

Hi there-The song Mister Rabbit-Any idea who wrote this and where would I get the words and music-Thank you


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: GUEST,Callie
Date: 24 Jun 01 - 08:05 PM

More recent songs: Master Blaster (Stevie Wonder); Walking on Thin Ice (Yoko Ono).


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: hesperis
Date: 24 Jun 01 - 08:41 PM

bluesdogg - the scale that you used as "pentatonic" is actually the "major pentatonic". Pentatonic just means five notes, and you can get a different "scale" by starting on a different note of the pattern. Sort of like if you use all the white keys on the piano, which is normally a Major Scale if you start on C. If you act like the tonic is D, then the scale is actually the Dorian scale, not the Major scale.

So the Minor Pentatonic in C is C Eb F G Bb C, which is one note (F#) less than the "blues scale".
The Major Pentatonic in C is C D E G A C.

But the blues scale also has a certain style of playing, where you bend the notes around. Pentatonic doesn't really have that.

If you wanted a Minor Pentatonic on all the white notes, you would use A C D E G A as the pattern. It's a whole different feel, and the same 5 notes.

I used minor pentatonic to create "Kwan Yin", and would be happy to donate a gif and a midi to that site.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: GUEST,CraigS
Date: 24 Jun 01 - 09:42 PM

The blues scale is not a scale - it is merely a formalisation of many elements in blues music. One of the significant features of the playing of Robert Johnson, for example, is his heavy use of the flatted FOURTH, and if that ain't blues I'm Chinese!

Nobody's mentioned Debussy's L'apres-midi d'une faune, and that is a real exercise in the pentatonic (but not folk). For really obvious folk pentatonic stuff you need to look to pipe-and-drum tunes, such as the old Breton tune Pat-a-Pat-a-Pan, which were designed to be played on what was effectively a tin whistle with only the first three holes open ( so that the player could strike the drum with the other hand).


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 24 Jun 01 - 11:36 PM

I just looked up "pentatonic" in the dictionary, and it does not simply mean "five notes." (If it did, we would be speaking of quadratonic, heptonic, etc, and we don't.)

A pentatonic scale is a major scale which omits the fourth and seventh tones. This is stated in the very first message above - check the syllables.

Rounds are often pentatonic.

Since omitting the fourth and seventh eliminates much dissonence, I think pentatonic music is the reason why certain kinds of music (Chinese comes to mind) never clashes and never gets interesting, either. It also explains why certain kinds of dance music can go on all night without anything being written or memorized. People just agree on a pentatonic scale and jam, jam, jam.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: hesperis
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 02:15 AM

Which dictionary? I only trust Oxford Canadian Dictionary...

Actually, in very obscure Jazz, they do talk about weird scales like "quadratonic". Of course, the guys might have just been trying to impress me. They were senior students... right?

And I learned "penta" = "5", with all the other cool stuff added in my previous post. I also learned the "blues scale" in high school jazz class. Maybe it's not just a formalization anymore? We were tested on this stuff. Here in Canada anyway.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 03:49 AM

Hi friends,

just a little hint from old Europe: By definition in the pentatonic scale the half steps are omitted, so from the original 7 tones (without the octave, naturally) there remain 5. So you only have do, re, mi, sol, la, (do). Sounds sometimes a little bit like a minor scale, due to the lack of the half step si-do, but the mi gives the flat sound back. Do not mix it with the old church scales (Doric, Lydic etc.; they are all truly heptatonic). First pentatonic song I thought of was Auld Lang Syne, which I learned with the Boy Scouts.

Wilfried


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: JulieF
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 11:47 AM

I seem to remember from school that Debussy's Girl with the Flaxen Hair was also pentatonic. I assume that this is based on a folk song.

Julie


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: chip a
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 12:32 PM

http://www.accad.ohio-state.edu/~spencer/FF/index.html

If I did it right, the above is a great place for definitions of all sorts of folk music stuff. There is a good section on the modes.

Well worth checking out.

Maybe someone can make a blue thing for this?

Chip A.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Burke
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 12:52 PM

gaelicconquest, I'm guessing that you revived this thread because a keyword search gave you a hit on the song you're wondering about. I suggest you start a new thread with Mister Rabbit in the subject line to get an answer.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: hesperis
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 02:22 PM

Blue Clicky for ChipA


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: ollaimh
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 07:45 PM

alex--bagpipes are diatonic and not pentatonic, that's scottish great pipes, i don't know much about irish pipes but i think they are also diatonic. this alows one key only, but a full scale within that key, but with no accidentals. scotts small pipes are in the same scale as great pipes though rarely in the same key


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 25 Jun 01 - 08:09 PM

For the Tin Pan Alley buffs among us, try "Ev'ry little breeze [seems to whisper Louise]" and "I'll be loving you... [always]". In "Always", the second line ("With a love that's true...") is the first five notes of the major scale. Makes it a little easier for us somewhat intervallically challenged singers.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: GUEST,SharonA
Date: 26 Jun 01 - 12:07 PM

Yeah, but the fourth line of "Always" ("...need a helping hand") is so-la-do-re-mi in a different key from lines 1 and 3. Does that still count as pentatonic? I thought a pentatonic song had to use the SAME do-re-mi-so-la NOTES throughout, in the same key. Please enlighten.

(Actually, whether you read the second line as either so-la-TI-do-re or do-re-mi-FA-so, it's not pentatonic anyway.)


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: chip a
Date: 26 Jun 01 - 12:15 PM

Thank you Hesperis!

Chip A.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Burke
Date: 26 Jun 01 - 12:21 PM

Pentatonic scales tend to omit half steps, I doubt that something using 5 diatonic notes in a row would overall be pentatonic.

I was looking a few folk pentatonic tunes, they seem to use: do,re,mi,sol,la (omit fa and ti) "Minor" looks like it starts on la but still omits fa & ti: la,do,re,mi,sol,la. With no fa, there's no issue of if it's Dorian or Aeolian minor.

I see this has already been said, but since I typed it, I'll submit it.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: GUEST,Thomas Robertson
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 02:20 PM

I thank all of you.
I realize it's been years ago, but I happened to check this thread 12 years later.

In case anyone is still interested, I have a new Web address at:
http://www.pentatonika.net

and a new e-mail address at:
suhwahaksaeng@yahoo.com


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 02:57 PM

And meanwhile I've put up a lot of info about pentatonic and other scales here:

http://www.campin.me.uk/Music/Modes/


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 03:40 PM

Blue clicky for Thomas's site:
http://www.pentatonika.net/

Something Thomas doesn't include: therapeutic uses of pentatonic scales. These are described (within the framework of traditional Islamic medicine) at the Tumata website - they have CDs for sale:

http://www.tumata.com/99ing_default.aspx
http://www.otagmusic.com/index.php?do=catalog/product&pid=6

One oddity is that Guvenc insists that pentatonic therapeutic music (like that CD, which sounds mostly like Central Asian folk tunes) should only be used with children. Most of his CDs are of seven-note scales, intended for adults with all sorts of medical conditions.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: GUEST,Timsan
Date: 19 Jul 11 - 10:16 PM

I stumbled on this, looking for songs based around the pentatonic scale.

I'm teaching a bloke how to play the Caisa (http://www.caisa-music.com/) which is tuned in C pentatonic (G A C' D' E' G' A' C" D" E") and I was casting around for things to show him.

Thanks especially to John in Brisbane for that compilation of songs. Pure gold, mate!

PS. The Blues scale is a modified minor pentatonic scale, while most of the tunes in that list use the major pentatonic. Here are both in C:

C Major Pentatonic: C D E G A C etc; (1, 2, 3, 5, 6 if you think in terms of the notes in the major scale)

C Blues: C Eb F G Bb C etc. (1, flat3, 4, 5, flat7) It's important to note that Gb is frequently used as a passing note between F and G.

Both are technically "pentatonic", since they have 5 tones, but the first is the "pure" pentatonic.


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Subject: RE: pentatonic songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 20 Jul 11 - 09:15 AM

The Caisa is a knockoff of the Hang drum - the Hang can be made in a variety of scales.

Caisa
Hang drum

There are also a bunch of cheaper Hang alternatives inspired by Dennis Havlena's "Hank drum".


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