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Children's Street Songs

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murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 06 Mar 98 - 07:40 PM
Alice 06 Mar 98 - 08:32 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 06 Mar 98 - 09:06 PM
Jerry Friedman 06 Mar 98 - 09:38 PM
Will 06 Mar 98 - 09:58 PM
Moira Cameron 06 Mar 98 - 10:04 PM
Alice 06 Mar 98 - 11:48 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 07 Mar 98 - 07:03 AM
Alice 07 Mar 98 - 11:06 AM
Alice 07 Mar 98 - 11:10 AM
Barry Finn 07 Mar 98 - 11:32 AM
Joe Offer 07 Mar 98 - 04:55 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 07 Mar 98 - 08:02 PM
alison 08 Mar 98 - 12:17 AM
Joe Offer 08 Mar 98 - 03:34 AM
Alice 08 Mar 98 - 10:04 AM
Moira Cameron 08 Mar 98 - 12:33 PM
Jon W. 09 Mar 98 - 05:04 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 09 Mar 98 - 06:07 PM
alison 09 Mar 98 - 11:31 PM
Bert 10 Mar 98 - 09:49 AM
Jon W. 10 Mar 98 - 10:57 AM
dani 10 Mar 98 - 12:51 PM
Jerry Friedman 10 Mar 98 - 02:03 PM
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Subject: Children's Street Songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 07:40 PM

In Philadelphia, at least up into the 50s, you used to hear children (especially girl children) singing songs while they played. The same ones were used generation after generation. It might have gone on after that, but I began to live in neighborhood where there were not many kids.

Since I have lived in Sydney, I haven't heard this. I moved there in '75. So there is a gap in my Philadelphia experience from, say '57 to '75. Can anyone tell me if the custom died out there during that interval. I assume it was a big city pehnomenon, rather than just a Philly one.

I was reminded of this listening to a Smithsonian Leadbelly CD. He does a children's song called Little Sally Walker which he says comes from where he comes from. It goes something like:

Little Sally Walker
sitting in a saucer
turn to the east, turn to the west
turn to the one that you love best

The one I remember goes something like

Little Sally Anne
Sitting in the sand
turn to the...
(The rest is the same.)

If Leadbelly remembers it from his childhood, it has managed travel through a lot of time and space.

Another one was a rope-skipping song starting with

One, two, three, O'Leary

Murray


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Subject: Lyr Add: B FOR BARNEY
From: Alice
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 08:32 PM

Murray, I had forgotten the "Little Sally Walker" song... it's been about 40 years since I've sung it!! We did lots of jump rope songs and game songs, too. There is an old Belfast street song to which I had found two verses a year ago. The tune is similar to "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star", with a minor key twist to it. It is called "B For Barney" I wrote additional verses after the first two, so I will share them with all of you Mudcatters!!

B For Barney
(1st 2 verses traditional
the rest by Alice Flynn)

B for Barney, C for Cross, R for my love, Barney Ross.
All the world will never, never know,
How I loved my Barney-O.

A for Apple, P for Pear, Dark is the color of my true love's hair.
All the world will never, never know,
How he loved his lady-O.

O for Orange and G for Green, I'm like you, and you're like me.
All the world will never, never know,
If our parents can see it so.

H for hatred and I for ink, will the peace come, do you think
All the world will never, never know
If the troubles will come or go.

F for fighting and G for gun, when you hear the bullets, you must run.
All the world will never, never know,
If the children will live to grow.

J for Johnny and K for Kate, children sing of love and hate.
All the world will never, never know.
If the love or hate will grow.

B for Barney and C for Cross, R for my love Barney Ross.
All the world will never, never know,
How I loved my Barney-O.
My Barney-O, my Barney-O, and how he loved his Lady-O.

alice, montana


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Subject: Lyr Add: A MY NAME IS ALICE
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 09:06 PM

Alice, that reminds me of one that is played with a bouncing ball. It goes through the alphabet, and the girls did some tricks like putting their leg over the ball. If a girl fumbled, or couldn't find the words for the letters they lost their turn. It started our

A my name is Alice and my husband's name is Alan
we come from Alabama where we sell Apples

The pattern is always

xxxx my name is xxxx and my husband's name is xxxx
we come from xxxx where we sell xxxx

Where the xxxx is filled in by names, places and products starting with the different letters of the alphabet.

It is hard to fix the tune. It is more a chant.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 09:38 PM

In my childhood (I was born in '61), we didn't sing songs on the street; we sang them on the bus to summer camp. I think that ended with the invention of cheap radios loud enough to be "enjoyed" by everyone on the bus.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Will
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 09:58 PM

We do the "My name is xx" as a game on long car trips. Metaphysical bonus points for humourous combinations and odd towns. I like it as a way of digging back into my geographical history. Where else would I get to use "Skookumchuck" and "Yahk" in sentences?


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 10:04 PM

A really good resource for this topic is Iona and Peter Opie's two volume collections of Children's Street songs and lore. They have several street songs and verses from playgrounds around the world. It's amazing how children are singing the same little songs whatever their culture.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Alice
Date: 06 Mar 98 - 11:48 PM

I remember being at a birthday party when I was about 7, and the mother of the birthday girl was from the Southern US. She taught us a game we played at the party that was two lines of girls walking back and forth, towards and then away from each other. The song was "Walkin' on the green grass, green grass, green grass, Walkin' on the green grass, Rat-ta-tat-ta-tee-i-oh."
What are you doin that for, that for, etc.
We're goin' to get married, married, etc.
Who ya gonna marry, marry, etc.
We're gonna marry, XXX, XXX, etc.
Then the chosen girl would go over to the other side. Anyone else hear of this one? I always connected it to the South, because this mom had a southern drawl, which seemed really exotic in Montana.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 07 Mar 98 - 07:03 AM

Alice Moira Will and Jerry. I assume you all live in America. Do you still hear children singing them on the streets.

My original posting was to see if the fact that I son't hear children singing them here is a question of time or of place.

As often happens, I got a lot of other interesting information from the posting. Even if you help me resolve the question, it was worth the trouble.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Alice
Date: 07 Mar 98 - 11:06 AM

Sorry, Murray, I did go a bit off track of your original question. I just asked my ten year old son if he hears the kids at school singing songs when they jump rope or play games. He said, "Mom, it's winter. There's tons of snow outside. Nobody is jumproping." He always takes me literally when I ask a question. So, I dug deeper. Yes, the little girls still sing songs with the jump rope games. But, I asked if they ever learned games with songs in gym class, and he said, "No, but he plays music on the tape deck sometimes while we are doing stuff in gym." "What kind of music does the teacher play?" "The theme to Mortal Kombat." Sigh,... oh, well. If it is a consolation, the school had their yearly "Hoedown" one evening last week, and the kids spent a day in gym doing square dances. The music for the hoedown was provided by a man who played live music for their gym class, too. He played banjo, button accordian, and guitar, while they learned to dance, and his seven year old son played along with spoons.
alice, in montana


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Alice
Date: 07 Mar 98 - 11:10 AM

Murray, I also remember that when my son was younger, kids were making up parodies to the Barney the Dinosaur song (I hate you, you hate me..) etc. The little boys try to show they are "tough" by coming up with gross lyrics. I think parents of little girls are going to have to give us some feedback on whether game songs and playground/street songs are still being sung.

alice


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Barry Finn
Date: 07 Mar 98 - 11:32 AM

I asked my kids if they still sing while jumping rope or bouncing ball & they said they still do, along with neighborhood friends, as a kid (1950's) I remember it as going on non stop. From time to time I see a televised competation on jumping rope, I think it's done to rap now. Barry


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 07 Mar 98 - 04:55 PM

There was a terrific jumprope hypertext archive on a Web site a while back, but I haven't been able to connect there lately.
Here's the URL: http://www.uwf.edu/~stankuli/jrope/jumprope.htm
Anybody know what happened to it?
-Joe Offer-
Ah, here is is:-Joe Offer, March, 2004-


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 07 Mar 98 - 08:02 PM

The consensus seems to be that children still sing as they play (no surprise :), but that they don't sing the same songs.

There was someone who went around the US recording sounds. He/she/they had street vendors, children's play songs, buskers, people who could sing double stops, you name it. It might not have been one person, but a project--maybe even one of those depression projects.

I think the Library of Congress has the recordings now. Does anyone remember who that (they) was (were)? They were played on the radio during the 60s folk revival, so they must be available.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: alison
Date: 08 Mar 98 - 12:17 AM

Hi,

I only ever knew the first verse of that Barney one. We did used to sing songs while we threw a ball against the wall "Upsy Mother Brown" and "1,2,3, O'Leary" spring to mind.

there is a good book full of that stuff called "Keep the kettle boiling - rhymes from a Belfast childhood."

slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 08 Mar 98 - 03:34 AM

Another goodbook to pick up is "I Saw Esau (The Schoolchild's Pocket Book)," by Iona and Peter Opie, with illustrations by the incomparable Maurice Sendak. I picked up a couple of copies on a remainder table for five bucks apies, and it's a wonderful collection of naughty rhymes. I was wondering if it's related to the two-volume set mentioned above.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Alice
Date: 08 Mar 98 - 10:04 AM

Murray, I prodded my memory, and I recall we would also sing the Sally Walker song with the lines, "one flew east, and one flew west, and one flew over the cuckoo's nest." We also did alot of complicated and fast hand clapping songs that we did in pairs of girls facing each other. I know I have seen girls doing this game on tv recently, so that has survived to this generation. I've heard girls my son's age do it to a version of "Mary Mack" Mary Mack, Mack, Mack, ... silver buttons down her back, back, back. The hand clapping songs and rhymes can get really complex. It would be an interesting project to go to schools and collect the current game songs. Any grad students out there looking for a thesis topic?

alice, montana


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 08 Mar 98 - 12:33 PM

I'm from Canada, born in Toronto. I remember singing several of these traditional street songs when I was growing up, espescially to accompany skipping or clapping games. As an adult, I can't say I've heard children singing on the streets, because I haven't hung around children in playgrounds lately. I'm living now in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. We have what we call House Ceilidhs, or song circles, up here. Sometimes children come and participate by telling the latest schoolyard joke or singing the latest street songs. The words to these songs are modernized somewhat, but they are still the same old songs.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Jon W.
Date: 09 Mar 98 - 05:04 PM

My kids seem to have inherited all their athleticism and coordination from their mother and me, so of course that precludes jumping rope...(Ha ha) Seriously, I've got a bunch of girls (no boys) and I think they still have rhymes and such for jumping rope and other games. The only one I can recall right off hearing them use is "(Joe) and (Sally) sitting in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G. First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes (Sally) with a baby carriage. (substitute appropriate names) I'll ask them tonight.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 09 Mar 98 - 06:07 PM

Alison, you are just the one to ask! Do you hear children singing the rhymes that you sang on the streets of Sydney.

Sombody else can do that thesis topic. I already did one and in the present pedaphilaphobic climate, I am not about to hang around Children's playgrounds!

Moira, it it is not too personal, what are you doing in the NW teritories?

Murray


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: alison
Date: 09 Mar 98 - 11:31 PM

hi Murray,

Sad sign of the times I think. I don't think kids actually play much in the streets any more like we would have used to.... too many "bad" people around. Not many people even let kids walk to school on their own in case something happens to them. My kids are still a bit young but they do sing to themselves.

When I was young we used to play ball against the wall in the street and had all sorts of rhymes and clapping, and skipping songs. But we were safe in the streets, you could trust people, you knew all of your neighbours and they would look after you.

Kids these days sing and play along with kids music videos

But yes my kids have come home from childcare and sung songs that I remember from when I was small. (A recent example being... " I sent a letter to my love, but on the way I dropped it, someone must have picked it up and put it in their pocket.) It gives me a thrill to hear them remind me of things I used to do.

slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Bert
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 09:49 AM

Moira,

Glad to hear that you give the children a chance to perform at your sings. We often get the neighbor's kids come in and sing with us.

We hope that it will start a lifetime habit for them.

Bert.


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Subject: Lyr Add: CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLA
From: Jon W.
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 10:57 AM

From my eleven-year-old daughter come these jump rope rhymes. She says they don't sing them, they are more of a chant than a song. They do this at school during recess.

Cinderella, dressed in yella, went upstairs to kiss a fella,
Made a mistake and kissed a snake, how many doctors would it take?
1, 2, 3, 4,...(count until jumper misses.)

Cinderella, dressed in blue, went outside to tie her shoe,
Goodness gracious, she'll be late. How many seconds did it take?
1, 2, 3, 4,...(count until jumper misses.)

Fudge, fudge, call the judge, (Sally's*) having a baby.
Wrap it up in toilet paper, send it down the elevator,
What shall it be?
Boy, girl, twins, triplets, boy, girl, twins, triplets...
(repeat until jumper misses)
*substitute jumper's name

Teddy bear, teddy bear, turn around,
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch the ground,
Teddy bear, teddy bear, tie your shoe,
Teddy bear, teddy bear, I love you.

This last one I have also heard sung as a lullaby. The jump rope version has a different rhythm and may have slightly different words.

Another thing they do is call out the names of the 50 USA states in alphabetical order, one state per jump. When the jumper misses, it is said that she will live in that state.

Another chant consists of repeating H, E, L, P, until the jumper misses. Then the letter she misses on signifies what type of jumping she must do next - H for Hot Peppers or High Wire, P for Peppers, and I don't remember what E and L stand for. Nor do I know the meanings of the jump names.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: dani
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 12:51 PM

What fun! Just this morning my first-grader taught me a clapping song she'd heard at school, and it brought back lots of memories.

Some of the stuff you're talking about was just re-released on a CD by Stephen Wade - he used the Library of Congress Recordings, and if I remember right he went back to some of the places the recordings had been made. Check it out.

Miss Mary MACK MACK MACK!! The first time I saw Ella Jenkins perform, a few years ago at the Folklife Festival on the Mall in DC, she asked everyone to turn to a neighbor and do Miss Mary if they remembered it. I ended up teaching it to my little girl AND a couple of young foreign girls wrapped in scarves and head coverings, who thought it was a hoot. I LOVE the thought of them taking it back to their friends in a faraway place.

THIS is what folk music is all about, if you ask me...

Dani


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 02:03 PM

From my growing up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, the only songs I can remember hearing with games were girls' jump-rope and hand-clapping chants. Girls' games were beneath my boyhood dignity, so the only hand-clap rhyme I remember was "A sailor went to sea sea sea/ To see what he could see see see,/ But all that he could see see see/ Was the bottom of the deep blue sea sea sea."

Our fifth-grade class put on a musical dramatization of the whitewash scene from Tom Sawyer (with a black boy as Tom, a white boy as Jim, and a black girl as Ben--it was the '60s). At one point there were girls playing a game with a song like

What do you do, Punchinello, Punchinello?
What do you do, Puchinello in your shoe?

We can do it too, Punchinello, Punchinello,
We can do it too, Punchinello in your shoe!

I'm not at all sure about the shoe part. This may have been in the script, or it may have been something from the students, in which case for some reason I think it would have been from black girls in the class.

Now in Espanola, New Mexico, I see kids playing in the street or their yards now and then, but I never hear songs or chants. This is a good point to feel sad about the demise of the unique Spanish children's folklore of northern New Mexico.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Jon W.
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 02:22 PM

Speaking of New Mexican Spanish children's folklore, I spent my 11-12th year in a small town near Silver City (southwest part of the state). There was a practice among my Mexican (or Mexican-American)friends of teasing anyone who had gotten something new (clothes, shoes, toys, etc.) by calling "orejitas" (lit. "little ears") and/or the action of grabbing and shaking the person's ear while making the sound of a ringing bell (ding-a-ling-a-ling). I just wondered if anyone else had heard of that lately (sorry this isn't very musical).


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Susan from California
Date: 10 Mar 98 - 04:15 PM

I think the reason kids don't play in the streets as much as they used to has at least as much to do with the advent of refrigerated a/c as it does with "bad people". There have always been bad people around, we just didn't hear about it as often or as immediately as we do now. But with nice cool air inside, who wants to go out into the hot moist air? The east and south of the US are miserable in the summer! I am lucky enough to live in Southern California, in a near desert community where the days are hot and dry in the summer, but the evenings are beautiful and cool. The kids are either inside or swimming during the day and they venture out in the cool of the evening-and so do the parents! Way off topic. sorry.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: MarcB
Date: 11 Mar 98 - 12:49 AM

I thought I'd posted to this today or yesterday but it didnt' show up so I must have missed the "submit" button.

What I said was something like(short term memory is the first to go)...

"I have two daughters, 9 and 11, and they very much sing and chant street songs. Mostly used for clapping games, some jump rope, and some just for the heck of it. I can't recall them all but will do a little field research and see if I can capture a few."

Since I wrote that I talked my girls at dinner tonight. They supplied the following which has some tune to it. Done as a hand jive. Two versions, nice and not nice.

Playmate

Say say my playmate
Come out and play with me
and Bring your dollies three
Climb up my apple tree
Slide down my rainbow
and we'll be playmates forever more.

Enemy

Say say my enemy
Come out and fight with me
And bring your devils three
Climb up my poison tree
Slide down my razor
Slam! into the dungeon door
And we'll be enemies forever more.

More later. Marc B


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 11 Mar 98 - 07:15 PM

I haven't heard "orejitas" here.

The second verse of the "playmate" song starts something like

I'm sorry, playmate,
I cannot play with you.
My dolly has the flu--
Boo-hoo-hoo-hoo-hoo-hoo.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Lli
Date: 02 Nov 98 - 01:46 AM

The verse I grew up with was:

I'm sorry, playmate I cannot play with you My dolly has the flu She might throw up on you.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 02 Nov 98 - 02:50 AM

The Pentatonic Music collection has some interesting street songs.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 02 Nov 98 - 08:32 AM

I will check with my six year old and see what they sing.

I just read through this top to bottom and noticed that nobody posted "I'll Tell Me Ma" which is a very old Belfast kids street song. Hey Alison, were they still singing that when you were a kid. Which, by the way, was not all that long ago. (a little shameless sucking up there folks) :-))

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: alison
Date: 02 Nov 98 - 10:12 AM

Hi Mick,

Crawling will get you everywhere.**grin**

Yes we sang "I'll tell me ma." Another one I remembered the other day was.

My Aunt Jane she called me in, she gave me tea out of her wee tin
Half a bap with sugar on the top, three ?black lumps out of her wee shop.

We used to sing this going round to the shop to buy handfuls of jelly snakes.

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Allan S.
Date: 02 Nov 98 - 11:32 AM

Does anyone remember one that started as follows Standing on the corner, not doing any harm along came a copper and grabbed me by the arm he took me round the corner and rang a little bell along came the ding dong going like hell

seven o'clockin the morning i looked upon the wall the roaches and the bed bugs were having a game of ball the score was 7 to nothing and th roaches were ahead when the roaches hit a home run that knocked me out of bed. etc etc.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 02 Nov 98 - 11:55 PM

Alison et al,

The Clancy's did that version years ago. It is the one that we do when we perform the song. There are several verses beyond the most common ones that people sing now. I am practicing on Wednesday (States Eastern time). I will post the complete lyrics then.

All the best,

Mick who is still crawling


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOY TO THE WORLD THAT SANTA'S DEAD
From: Barbara
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 01:44 AM

My daughter came home from third grade school playground singing that Barney song, the Robin/Batman parody and
    Joy to the world that Santa's dead
    We barbequed his head
    And what about his body?
    We flushed it down the potty
    And round and round it goes,
    and round and round it goes
    and Rou - ou-ou-ou-ou-ou-ou-ound it goes
She also had a singing and 2 person clapping game "When Susie was as baby... ( different things)" that ended with "Oo, Ah, lost my bra" and the gesture of crossing your hands over your chest. I'll ask her in the morning how it went.
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: alison
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 02:08 AM

Hi Barbara,

I remember Susie. She was all sorts of things including a doctor and a teacher. But the verse you're looking for is...

When Susie was a stripper, a stripper Susie was
and she went... ooh aah I lost my bra, left my knickers in my boyfriend's car.

Now how old did you say she was?

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 05:44 AM

Alan S. That verse about the bedbugs and roaches is in a Furry Lewis song c. 1929.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Barbara
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 04:27 PM

She's 12 now, Alison, and learned the song when she was 9 from a friend on the playground. I asked her when I drove her to school, and she had this much more:
    When Susie was a teacher
    A teacher Susie was
    She hit us with a ruler
    And gave us great big welts
    Call the operator
    Give me number nine
    Tell Susie not to hit us
    And now our hands are fine

And she had Suzie losing her bra as a granny (wonder who misheard that one and what the transition was) "at a party in her boyfriend's car".
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Ewan McV
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 04:41 PM

I just came in from collecting some 24 old and new kids playground songs from eight year olds in a school in Craigmillar, Edinburgh, Scotland, and found this thread.

Every school where I have enquired in in Scotland (some thirty so far)is hotching with such songs. I'll go back to today's school next week and expect to find another 20 songs.

Versions and cousins of many of the songs have been found in Australia within the last ten years. Earlier this year at a conference I saw a video of such games being played in Australia two years ago. Find a book of them called Toodaloo Kangaroo, compiled by Heather Russell, published in Austrralia by Hodder & Stoughton in 1990.

They are all over, but kids on direct enquiry will usually deny that they 'sing songs'. These are not considered 'songs' but activities of some kind. Sing kids a few, like A Sailor Went To See, and ask if they know other similar ones. Don't call them jumprope songs, rope jumping can disappear for years, and the songs get used for clapping, Chinese Ropes, etc.

The words keep changing, and the songs adapt or die, to be replaced. The Folk Process in vigorous action. I'm working on a doctorate on the subject.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MISS SUSIE HAD A STEAMBOAT
From: Animaterra
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 04:54 PM

Riding on the bus with my daughter on the way to a field trip last week I heard an old standard from my childhood:
    Miss Susie had a steamboat, the steamboat had a bell,
    The steamboat went to heaven, Miss Susie went to
    Hello, operator, please give me number nine,
    And if you disconnect me, I'll kick you right
    Behind the 'fridgerator, there was a piece of glass,
    Miss Susie sat upon it, and broke her little
    Ask me no more questions, I'll tell you no more lies,
    The boys are in the girl's room, pulling down their
    Flies are in the breadbox, Bees are in the park,
    Miss Susie and her boyfriend were kissing in the
    D-A-R-K, D-A-R-K, D-A-R-K
    Dark is for the movies, movies for the show,
    The show is for the tv,and that is all
    I know I know my ma, I know I know my pa,
    I know I know my sister with the forty-acre bra bra bra!!!

Wonderful 4th grade humor!


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHITE MAN, HE SMELL LIKE CASTILLE SOAP
From: gargoyle
Date: 03 Nov 98 - 11:46 PM

From my mother's days...on the Colorado prairies....at the "Buckeye School"

White man, he smell like Cas-teel Soap
Nigga, he smell like a ol' billy goat
An I don....like a nigga.
An I don....like a nigga.
No How!

It is sung in the tune of a 4/4 "one", "four" chord.
(ie key of C) GGGE,EEG-G,FFFD,DDF-F,FFEC,CCC-,ECCC-,D-C-.

Not PC....sorry...this one I believe dates back to the civil war....(and from the "Union Side" ta boot.)


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Little Robyn
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 04:33 AM

I'm looking for some extra words to one that was on a Folkways record I once had, called 'One, two, three and a zing, zing, zing'. I no longer have the record - I sent it to Iona and Peter Opie many years ago, before photocopy machines were easy to find, tho' I did make a cassette copy. I don't even remember the correct title of the song. It was a call and response type of song with the group repeating each line (except the very last one).

There was a man          (There was a man)
By the name Bill Bones    (By the name Bill Bones)
He had a goat             (He had a goat)
That he called his own.   (That he called his own)

Now this 'ere goat       (etc)
Was feeling fine
Ate six red shirts
Right off the line.

First Billy cursed
And then he swore
'This dogone goat
Will chew no more.'
   
He took him by
His wooly back
And tied him to
A railroad track.

There's another verse in here that I learnt elsewhere but can't remember it all -
.......
.......
Coughed up the shirts
And he flagged the train.

The engineer stopped
Got out to see
What this strange sight
On the track could be.

When he saw what it was
A woolly goat
Took out his knife
And he cut his throat.

Now this old goat
Was surely dead
He went to Heaven
Without a head.

And when he got there
Saint Peter said
'My dear old goat
Where is your Head?'

The goat replied
I cannot tell
It must have gone
Right down to (spoken)HELLO FOLKS!

The record also included 'Sipping Cider' in a similar style.
Can anyone fill in the blanks please. We've found a Robert Service poem with a very similar story but ending where the goat flags down the train.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Hugh Jampton
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 07:16 AM

Am I right in assuming the following song, made popular by an American girl group, is based upon a childrens street song over in the US?

Two, four, nine,
The goose drank wine,
The monkey chewed tobacco on the street car line.
THe line broke,
The monkey got choked,
They all went to heavan in a little row boat.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 10:19 AM

Here's one I heard from my niece 30 years ago

Boys have the muscles,
teachers have the brains.
Girls have the sexy legs
and we win the games.
Yay!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: ReeBop
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 12:08 PM

Ok, for me it wa only a couple years ago that I was on the playground. We did a lot of hand clapping and jump rope songs. "Oh the preacher went down" "Miss Mary Mack" "ci ci my playmate" were some of our favorites...but we also did "Yellow Submarine" "Waltzing Matilda" and anyting with a beat that we could play with.

Also, we had a bunch of versions of Yankee Doodle and "Krack Diddly O Ka" that had different "hand games" to them.

As for now...yes the kids still play in the street. I live in a very neighborhood type of NYC neighborhood on the first floor. I spend quite a bit of time at my window watching the local kids and -- boy can they play. Double Dutch and Jumping Rope mixed with break dancing. And one of my favorites from this past fall was a group of really little kids in a circle around one kid at a time singing "go _____ it's your birthday" which is a tag line in a popular rap song from this summer--it's actually a difficult rhythm that these 3 to 6 year olds had down perfectly.

And sometimes I hear old tunes that I know with new Spanglish lyrics...

Oh yeah, there is an ever-changing "Miss Mary Mack/oh you can't get to heaven" mix that I used to sing and I've heard some new "veses" to.


and there's this one that I've heard so many versions of:

A B C
it's easy as 1 2 3
yer mama's got funky feet
oosh ahsh I want a piece of squash
sqhash too sweet I want a piece of meat
meat too tough I wanna ride a bus
Buss too full I wana buy a bull
bull too black I want my money back
money too green I want a limosine
Limosine too long
I wanna write a song
song too old I want a pot of gold
gold to yella' I wanna kiss a fella
fella too fat
and that's the end of that

or
gold too yellow I'll Tickle you with a feather (and you reach out and try to tickle the person who you're playing with)

that's all I can remember right now...


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 12:21 PM

Little Robyn - do a search on "Bill Grogan's Goat" and you'll find plenty.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 12:43 PM

This thread is drifting all over the place. I love it! So no apologies for a bit more drift. An experiment my wife, Val, and I conducted a few weeks ago:

Ask any adult you like (but not a Mudcatter) how many nursery rhymes they know. Most will answer 'Oh, maybe a dozen' or will offer an even smaller number. Suggest that they know more than 20 and hardly any will agree.

Val and I decided to do a count and found we were word perfect (if the term is permissible in this context) in more than 70 - and we don't think that this is in any way an exceptional score. Try it. Write a list and keep adding to it as your memory comes up with them!

Furthermore, our grand daughter, not yet four, was familiar with most of our 70-plus. Without prompting she had difficulty reciting more than half a dozen, but she could join in on the majority. Interestingly, her preference is very much for rhymes where she can make up bits ('Aikin Drum' for example, puts no strain on the memory. Once you've got the general hang of it you can improvise).

Returning to the thread proper, I collected a pretty street rhyme many years ago, from a teacher who remembered it from her own childhood. It goes to a snappy, skippy little tune:

Off to the butchers I must go, I cannot wait any longer;
My mother said that I must not play with the boys down yonder;
White stockings, blue garters, hair tied up with silver,
A red rosette upon my chest and a gold ring on my finger.

Have never heard it since.

One reason you don't hear much like this today (apart from the fact that you won't hear if you don't listen) is that the urban streets of totally car-orientated populations are pretty hostile places. With both sides of the street lined with parked cars and the centre serving as a race track for saloon tanks, a child would be crazy to play any game that requires space, like 'Please Mr Fisherman' or 'What's the Time Mr Wolf?'

The saddest thing is that the drivers bombing through the middle are all too often parents who have been trained by their paranoid newspapers to see a paedophile around every corner - so they drive their kids to schools less than a mile away from home.

I don't know the answer, but offer the thought that irrational fear and automobile culture are major causes of obesity and the destruction of traditional lore.

Ah - I feel better now!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Little Robyn
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 01:54 PM

Thank you Becky. It is Bill Grogan's goat and the tune is there too! For those interested, the missing words are:

The whistle blew,
The train drew nigh
This poor old goat
Was doomed to die,

He gave 3 groans
Of awful pain
Coughed up the shirts
And flagged the train.

I see the DT version doesn't have the 'went to heaven without a head' bit. Was that added by the street kids, I wonder - one of those songs that give you a chance to say a forbidden word like HELL-o.
Now, I think I need to go teach that song to some of the kids over here!
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: s & r
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 03:36 PM

What we need is more school songs and playground games - all they appeared to do nowadays is want to fight!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Megan L
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 04:06 PM

this set the old grey matter ticking again. we sang things like
Down in the jungle
one two three oleary
I'm shirley temple
Sally in the kitchen
the big ship sails down the ealy ally o
ma maws a millionaire
ring a rosey

and a ball song i wish i could remember about soldiers lying dieing, although this was the early 60s it runs in my mind the song refered not the ww 1 or 2 but perhaps Boer or krimea war.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Debbie
Date: 01 Mar 04 - 12:25 AM


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 01 Mar 04 - 01:22 AM

Three of my favorites:

I should worry, I should care
I should marry a millionaire.
He should die, I should cry
I should marry another guy

(jumping rope)

and
I should worry
I should fret
I should marry
A suffragette.


or

Marguerite, go wash your feet
The boards of Health
Is across the street.


The joys of a Brooklyn upbringing!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: LNL
Date: 01 Mar 04 - 01:25 AM

When I was growing up, we all jump-roped to "Down by the river, where the green grass grows." My grandma taught me "1-2-3 O'Leary," so I always bounced a ball with that.

I was a counselor at a camp about three years ago, and the campers (good-natured high school students) played a surprising amount of games during break time. Not surprisingly, they weren't all innocent little rhymes. For example, Little Sally Walker has been reincarnated! She's now a circle game, with the chant:

"Little Sally Walker,/walking down the street.
She didn't know what to do, so/she jumped in front of me and said:
'Hey, girl, shake that thing,/shake that thing like it ain't no thing.
Come on, girl, shake that thing,/shake that thing like it ain't no thing."

And another favorite circle game:

"Here we go, ridin' that pony, riding around on that big fat pony.
Here we go, ridin' that pony, this is how we do it:
Front to front to front, oh, baby
Back to back to back, oh, baby
Side to side to side, oh, baby
This is how we do it"

Of course, both games were stopped more than once when campers became too...involved!

We also did the fairly innocuous "Wisconsin Milk" song, and a ton of other call-and-responses that don't quite qualify as street games.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,truelinor
Date: 06 Mar 04 - 02:35 PM

I have sung this song as long as I can remember and I ask about it on another board (IMDb) and some one gave me this site. The rest of the second verse, as I remembeer it goes:

I'm sorry playmate,
I cannot play with you,
My dolly's got the flu,
Boo hoo hoo hoo hoo hoo,
Ain't got no rain barrel,
Ain't got no cellar door,
But we'll be jolly friends,
Forevermore.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 06 Mar 04 - 04:08 PM

The Salvation army free from sin
Went to heaven in a cornbeef tin
The cornbeef tin began to smell
And the Salvation Army went to...
Helensburgh Castle stands upon a rock
If you want to pass it, you've got to show your....
Cocktail Ginger Ale, half a pint of water, stick it up your....
Ask no questions tell no lies
Shut your mouth and you'll catch no flies.
                  --------------
Mary Queen of Scots got her head chopped of
Head chopped off.
Head chopped off.
                  --------------

Queen Mary, Queen Mary
Ma age is sixteen
Ma faither's a fairmer on yonder green
He's plenty o' money tae dress me up braw
But there's nae bonny laddie will tak me awa.
                  ---------------

My Maw's a millionaire
Blue eyes and curly hair
Down amomng the Eskimos
Teaching them how to blow their nose
My maw's a millionaire
                  ---------------
These are all songs and fragments from kids rhymes, skipping and otherwise from my childhood.

John


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Mar 04 - 04:39 PM

LNL, please tell us about "Wisconsin Milk." I grew up in Racine, Wisconsin, and these things are very important to me.
-Joe Offer, now in California-


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Little Robyn
Date: 06 Mar 04 - 04:42 PM

Guest truelinor, the song you're looking for is in the DT. Just put Playmate in the box at the top and you'll find it. It used to be played on the radio a lot in the 50s, especially children's request sessions.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: LNL
Date: 09 Mar 04 - 02:57 PM

Sure thing. It's a call-and-response song. Here's the version we did. First, ya find a partner.

Leader: Give me a long M!
Everyone: Mmmmmmmmmmmmm
Leader: Give me a short M!
Everyone: M! (clap on beats for next two lines)
Don't gimme no pop, no pop
Don't gimme no tea, no tea;
Just gimme that milk - moo moo moo moo (Your partner extends his/her thumbs to resemble udders, 'milk' them while you sing the moo's)
Wisconsin milk - moo moo moo moo (Partner 'milks' your thumbs on moo's)

I did a search for other versions; one version is on this site:

http://www.irho.org/hcc.php


If you go to GLACURH cheers, there's a collection of songs that look like they're used during college freshmen orientation. We used most of these songs at the camp, as well.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: LNL
Date: 09 Mar 04 - 02:59 PM

Forgot to add - the rest of the song goes through M-I-L-K, with a sometimes-added verse "Give me a long milk!" "Chocolate!" "Give me a short milk!" "Skim!"


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Flash Company
Date: 10 Mar 04 - 10:26 AM

There was a record from Topic in the days of vinyl called 'The Singing Streets' featuring street songs of Manchester & dublin sung by Ewan McColl & Dominic Behan. It may be about on CD somewhere, I have never looked for it.
My Old Man , who was raised in the Ancoats area of Manchester vouched for much of the Manchester content when he heard it, things like:-
In Miller Street, in Miller Street,
Thy never wash their dirty feet,
They're growing spuds & sugar beet
Inside their mucky earholes!

FC


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,ginger
Date: 16 Mar 04 - 05:30 PM

When I was growing up the jump rope song to Teddybear lullabye went like this:
Teddy bear, teddy bear turn around,
teddy bear, teddy bear touch the ground,
teddy bear , teddy bear go upstairs ,
teddy bear , teddy bear say your prayers,
teddy bear teddy bear turn out the light,
teddy bear , say good night.

We also did actions while jumping, ie: turned around in a circle,
touched the ground, picked up high knees to go up stairs,
folded hands to say prayers, flicked a finger to turn out the light,then jumped out of the rope to the side to say goodnight, this ended your turn. That sure was alot of fun! I came to this site to learn others to teach my daughter.Thanks alot everyone!

ginger


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Lighter
Date: 16 Mar 04 - 05:39 PM

My grandmother grew up in the 1890s, though not in Brooklyn. Her version of the "Board of Health" rhyme was

Punky feet, punky feet,
The Board of Health is across the street.

The tune was essentially Gounod's "Funeral March of a Marionette" (the Alfred Hitchcock theme).

Believe it or not.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Celeste
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 11:55 AM

Murray,

I grew up in South Philadelphia in the 50s and early 60s. I was one of those girls singing rhymes while jumping rope. So it was going on up until '64 at least.

And Alan, You asked if anyone remembers the song starting "Standing on the corner, not doing any harm along came a copper and grabbed me by the arm ...."

I know that as the Wiffer Woffer song. I went into my daughter's school when she was in third grade and taught it to the class.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Q
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 01:47 PM

Mentioned before, I think, but an interesting little book is "Songs and Sayings of an Ulster Childhood," 1983, Alice Kane, ed. Edith Fowke. The copy I have was printed in Canada by McC and S, but I believe that there is a UK edition. Many street rhymes.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Beanz49@aol.com
Date: 18 Mar 04 - 08:24 AM

I am searching for a song, the lyrics are something like this., "oh, pretty or little playmate come out and play, bring your dollies three, slide down my rainbow," some of the lyrics that I recall. If you can be of any help to find this song, it would be greatly appreciated...thank you...Gloria


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Beanz49@aol.com
Date: 18 Mar 04 - 08:24 AM

I am searching for a song, the lyrics are something like this., "oh, pretty or little playmate come out and play, bring your dollies three, slide down my rainbow," some of the lyrics that I recall. If you can be of any help to find this song, it would be greatly appreciated...thank you...Gloria


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Shamiere
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 02:25 PM

My husband actually taught my daughter's a song that he remembered as a child in the late 60s/early 70s.

Hey you, over there, with the nappy nappy hair.
My back is achin' my pants too tight, my bootie shakin' from the left to right
M' Gowa, Black Power, yo' mama needs a shower.
Destroy, little boys, soul sister number nine, sock it to me one more time.
Mmm! Mmm! Mmm!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Q
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 02:50 PM

Beanz49, the song is "Playmate," it is in the DT under that title. Enter playmate into the Search blank.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 25 Mar 04 - 03:38 AM

As a Primary School ( 4 to 11 years ) teacher, I was fascinated by the clapping songs done by the older girls ( 9 to 11 ) in the school yard, and about 7 years ago I videod a number of them performing a collection of pieces. At the moment, it seems out of fashion to perform these songs - at least in my school.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Neighmond
Date: 25 Mar 04 - 04:41 AM

I never seem to hear them anymore, but I seldome see younger children outside.

Here's one from my misspent youth:

Sadie sunflower, growing up high
as all little girls and boys must die
Except (say a name) Who is the best girl!
Hang down your head in shame!
Tell us girls your lover's name!

(The named girl then tells a name.)

(Boy's name) is a fine young man!
Came to the church with his ring on his hand!
The bride puts on her wedding dress
and (calls the boy?) she loves the best.

Stop the wedding! I am sick!
Call the doctors quick, quick, quick!
Ask the doctor if I'll die
We all die after awhile.
You'll be sorry when I die
for all the times you made me cry.



There are more parts to it but I am lucky I remembered that much.

Chaz


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Q
Date: 09 Jun 04 - 01:51 PM

A good selection of children's rhymes i the book, "Doctor Knickerbocker and Other Rhymes, a Canadian Collection," by David Booth, illus. Maryann Kovalski, 1993, Kids Can Press Ltd.
Three of them-

I'm a little acorn brown.
Lying on the cold, cold ground.
Everybody steps on me,
That's why I'm a nut, you see.

I'm a nut, tuh, tuh,
I'm a nut, tuh, tuh,
I'm a nut in a rut, you see.

I call myself on the phone
Just to see if I'm at home.
I ask myself on a date,
Yje latest time is half-past eight.

I'm a nut, tuh, tuh,
I'm a nut, tuh, tuh,
I'm a nut in a rut, you see.
---
When I eat my Smarties, I eat the blue ones last.
I suck them slowly, I crunch them very fast.
I never eat the chocolate, I always eat the shell.
When I eat my Smarties, I eat them very well.
---
Sweetly sings the donkey
As he goes to the grass,
He who sings so sweetly
Is sure to be an ass.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Anne Croucher
Date: 09 Jun 04 - 11:05 PM

From south Yorkshire, late 50's Junior school - 7 to 11 year olds.

Wallflowers Wallflowers, growing up so high
We are all pretty maids and we don't want to die
Except for xxx xxx she's the chosen one
Turn your back,xxx (first name only)


This was a circling game - almost a ritual and I can't remember the end of the rhyme ( its beat was ti tum ti tum ti tum) or the finish of the game - as the girls circled clockwise (boys were not allowed)as each name was called the girl turned clockwise so she was facing outwards with her arms crossed - the girl on her left lifted her arm up to facilitate the turn.

The end was dangerous - there were sprained wrists and ankles from playing wallflowers. It might have been spinning around faster and faster until someone fell down - possibly.

There was also 'the big ship sails' - where a line of girls threaded under the arms of those at the end of the line - the last girl put her right hand on a wall or held a post to make the first arch. The leader went through each arch, drawing the rest after her, and the row gradually was twisted from facing left with linked hands to facing right with crossed hands. The line broke up when they were all turned - one of our teachers said that it was a chasing game - that when the line broke the girl with her hand on the wall or post had to chase the others, and when caught they formed a line - the last one caught was the one to put her hand on the wall and be the chaser next time, and the one to lead the line.

Skipping - 'lady in a tight skirt can't do this' - jump up and kick forwards and backwards, 'lady in a tight skirt can't do that' - kick out sideways, 'and this and that' - repeat with jumping until failure.

'All in together girls, never mind the weather girls when I count to thirty you've got to be out five ten fifteen twenty twenty five thirty'everyone had to run out of the rope.
Then you have to be in - everyone had to run back and start to jump again - then 'when I say your birthday you have to be out January etc'

If you stopped the rope - some of which were long and heavy, you had to take over from the longest serving turner and they joined in the skipping.

Anne


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,guest mick
Date: 10 Jun 04 - 12:12 PM

anyone remember this one?
When I was young my life begun
the day I went to sea .
I jumped aboard a pirate's ship
and the captain said to me,
I wanna go this way that way forward and backway
Over the Irish sea
With a bottle of rum to warm me tum
And that's the life for me.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Ewan McVicar
Date: 10 Jun 04 - 03:04 PM

The Lomax series on Rounder, 1951 recordings of Scottish Children' Songs, is just being released. I can't say if it's much good, I made it!!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: jack halyard
Date: 10 Jun 04 - 04:57 PM

My kids at the childcare centres I work at are singing;

one two three,
Mummy caught a flea,
Put it in the teapot to make a cup of tea,
Flea jumped out,
Mummy gave a shout,
In came daddy with his shirt hanging out.

We're off, we're off,
We're off in a motor car,
Fifty coppers are after us,
And they don't know where we are.

Twinkle twinkle Vegemite,
On a sandwich brown or white,
If you drop it on the ground,
It will turn your carpet brown,
Twinkle twinkle Vegemite,
I'm OK and you're alright.
( for Americans, Vegemite is a thick, brown, yeast-based goop children seem to enjoy on bread.)

And finally a set of words composed by Adie, a four year old, that's become a local classic.

Tyrannosaurus Rex is built like a tree,
When I saw him coming, I had to have a wee,
I was so scared I had to flee,
What would he do to me.

Use a downhill bass line like "16 tons" or "Hit the road,Jack" and sing the melody uphill and you have the tune. Key usually Em.

                              Your good health, folks,

                               Jack Halyard


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Snuffy
Date: 11 Jun 04 - 08:26 AM

That's a counting song, Mick

When I was one, I had some fun
the day I went to sea .
I jumped aboard a pirate's ship
and the captain said to me,
We're going this way that way forwards and backwards
Over the Irish sea
With a bottle of rum to warm me tum
And that's the life for me.

When I was two, I lost my shoe
the day I went to sea etc

Make up your own rhymes - clean for adults, lavatorial for kids!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Little Robyn
Date: 11 Jun 04 - 06:07 PM

The local Girl Guides sang a version of the Pirate song but they sang
'We're going north, south, east, west.....'
with foot pointing actions for each direction - north=to the front, south=toe to the ground behind you, east=toe out to the right, west=toe behind your left foot, and then when you get to 'UP the Irish sea' you do a lovely high kick!
Great fun.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Vanessa
Date: 30 Jun 04 - 09:44 PM

I cant belive kids are still singing this:
like
........................
I hate u u hate me (barney)


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: LadyJean
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 12:23 AM

Overheard from two little girls on a bus:
Oh my don't cry mama's having a baby (move arms as though rocking)
Daddy's going crazy(twirl fingers beside head.)
If it's a boy I'll give it a toy.( As though handing a toy.)
If it's a girl I'll give it a curl. (Draw a curl on forehead.)
Wrap it up in toilet paper, send it down the escalator.

From my grade school days:
Whistle while you work.
Cyril is a jerk.
Mussolini bit his weenie
Now it doesn't squirt.
(Mussolini had been dead a good 20 years when I heard this.)

From My mother, whose family came from Cincinnatti, which has a large German population.

Oh the Dutch company is the best company, that ever come over from Old Germany
There's the Amsterdam Dutch, and the Potsdam Dutch, and the Rotterdam Dutch, and the goddam Dutch.
Oh! God save the Irish! God save the Irish! God save the Irish, they're a damn fine race.

Mother also sang the song I learned as Three Jolly Fishermen as Three Wandering Jews. In my version they went to Amsterdam. In mother's version they went to Damascus. The punchline to the song is the same. The song has you singing "Amster- Amster- dam dam dam" or "Dam dam as as cus cus cus", you aren't really saying a four letter word, except you really are.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 02:44 AM

To the tune of "This Old Man" aka "Barney Song"

I love you,
You love me,
Barney gave me H.I.V.
With a hug and a kiss and a little bit more,
I got A.I.D.S. from a dionsaur.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 03:18 AM

Nineteen miles to Blackberry Cross,
To see a Black Man ride on a white horse.
The rogue was so saucy he wouldn't come down
To show me the road to the nearest town.
I picked up a turnip and cracked his old crown,
And made him cry turnups all over the town


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Q
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 08:55 PM

There is a lot of documentation on "Water, Water, Wallflowers 2" in the DT. This game has a long history in the UK and Ireland. Usually it is catalogued under the title "Down She Comes As White As Milk."
In the United States, Newell published this version from New York, in 1883, with music:

Water, water, wild flowers, growing up so high;
We are all young ladies,
And we are sure to die,
Excepting Susie Allen.
She is the finest flower,
Fie, fie, fie for shame;
Turn about and tell your beau's name.
(The girl complying, the ballad proceeds-)

Mister Nobody is a nice young man,
He comes to the door with his hat in his hand.

Down he comes, all dressed in silk,
A rose in her bosom, as white as milk.

She takes off her gloves, she shows me her ring,
Tomorrow, tomorrow, the wedding begins.

Newell, W. W., 1883 (1963, Dover), Games and Songs of American Children, No. 12, pp. 67-68.
Newell commented: "This round is remarkable for being introduced, wherever it occurs, by a stanza with a different melody, whereby the ballad is turned into a game. By this introduction the hero and heroine of the action are selected.
""Little Sally Waters," or "Uncle John," having been first played, the round proceeds about the couple standing in the ring:" At this point, Newell introduces a version of "white as milk" that was played in Massachusetts "before 1800."

See comments and "Water-Flower" version, posted by Azizi, thread 6108:
Wade in the Water


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: celticblues5
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 12:52 AM

My kids did several of those mentioned above, such as Miss Mary Mack and the sitting in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G song. They also adored -

"There's a place in France
Where the naked ladies dance
And the men can see it all
Through a hole in the wall
But the men don't care
'Cause they're in their underwear
And the ladies are wearing
Their B-R-As!"

I think kids are still getting a lot of the traditional songs, thanks in part to groups like Sharon, Lois, & Bram, and thanks in part to elementary teachers - those school song books still have a lot of the oldies.

Some years ago I heard Jean Redpath (maybe on PHC) sing a medley of traditional street songs, starting with "Up Against the Wall, the London Ball," and ending with "I've a Laddie in Americay." In between was a little bit of a song that had to do with a child who was taking her dad some dinner - wonder if anyone knows the complete lyrics - all that I can remember are little bits -

"[name] stole me new topcoat, me new topcoat, me new topcoat, [name] stole me new topcoat, and [name] tore the linin"

and "ah ha ha, ye needna run, ye needna run, ye needna run, ah ha ha, ye needna run, for ye'll get yer licks in the mornin'

and "My mother says that I must go with my father's dinner-o" and something about a "bawbee bake."

Possibly these are two different songs and I'm just merging them in my memory. Can anyone help with the lyrics to this (these)? Also, I was under the impression that a bawbee was a coin - ? Did I hear the word incorrectly in the Redpath song, or are they two different words or the same word with two different meanings?

Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Dec 04 - 10:20 PM

mailman mailman
do your duty
here comes a lady with an
african booty
she can do the pom pom
she can do the twist
most of all she likes to kiss


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 02 Dec 04 - 10:54 PM

Ill never forget my 7 year old daughter singing in the street after school.
Oh Ah I lost my bra
I lost my bra
In my boyfriends car..


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Snuffy
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 08:44 AM

I heard it as:

Ooh ,aah,
Cantona
I lost my knickers
In my boyfriends car

This would pretty much date it to the period when Eric Cantona was playing for Man U (say 1995-2000?)


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,srich
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 10:22 AM

Several excellent books have been mentioned on this thread. I must include "Step it Down" Bessie Jones. This book is loaded!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 10:33 AM

Say what you will
School dinners make you ill;
Robin Hood was sick on shepherd's pie,
So throw your din din
In the pig bin
Or else you'll die.

(London about 50 years ago).

Quick, quick, the cat's beeen sick.
Where? Where? Under the chair.
Hasten, hasten, fetch a basin.
Too late, too late, it's all in vain
The cat has licked it up again

(current)


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 01:44 PM

Here's another children's rhyme that mentions "bra"
Group                Bang Bang Choo Choo Train.
                Watch Kadisha* do her thang.
Soloist #1        I can't,
Group                Why not?
Soloist #1        I can't.
Group                Why not?
Soloist #1        Because my back is aching.
                My bra's too tight
                And my hips keep movin                                                from the left to the right.
Group                Her back is aching
                Her bra's too tight
                Her hips keep movin from                                        the left to the right

* personalize name
[This is a foot stomping cheer that I collected from African American girls in Pittsburgh, PA area,1999}

Somewhat like Guest's Dec 2, 2004 rhyme, when I was growing up in Atlantic City, New Jersey in the 1950s we jumped rope to "Postman, Postman do your duty/here comes Debby*, an American beauty/she can wiggle/she can wooble/she can do the split/but I betcha 5 dollars she can't do this.
We would then do actions and chant "lady on one foot, one foot/one foot/turn around/lady on two foot/two foot/two foot/touch the ground etc {it would continue with lady on three foot meaning two feet and one hand on the ground, but I don't remember what the rhyming word was. It ended with lady on four foot {both hands and both feet touching the ground and we would say something like "jump out now", This was said if the person jumping had lasted that long without missing,which I usually didn't.

In the 1980s Pittsburgh, PA my daughter and her friends used the African booty line. "African booty" means "big butt"-and is a compliment. But my daughter and her friends said, "She can wiggle/she can woogle/she can do the flips {or "she can do the splits"}. And they didn't add the "lady on one foot" parts.

I think we had more fun way back then.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: *Laura*
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 05:19 PM

When I was about four I seem to remember us singing:

'Dan, dan the dirty old man,
washed his hair in the frying pan,
combed his hair with the leg of a chair...'

then I'm not sure - maybe it just went 'Dan dan the dirty old man' again.

And also -

Elvis Presely
Girls are sexy/God damn sexy (depending on how 4 we were!)
Sitting in the back seat
Drinking Pepsi!

And possibly one of my first tastes of swearing - that rhyme you do (like eeny meeny miny mo) for deciting who's 'it' in a game of tig - was
'Ip dip dog shit
fuckin bastard,
dirty git" - I doubt we knew what any of the words meant though!

xLx


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Little Robyn
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 05:36 PM

Hi Laura,
I remember
Dan, Dan, the dirty old man,
Washed his face in a frying pan,
Combed his hair with the leg of a chair
And......
I forget. But there's definitely another line there. Something like Went to bed in his underwear!
Cheers,
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: *Laura*
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 05:38 PM

Oh that's it - it's washed his face, not his hair. I thought that sounded a bit funny.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: sue exhull
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 05:43 PM

Hi the version we said was
Dan Dan, dirty old man, washed his face in the frying pan,
combed his hair with a donkeys tail,and scratched his belly with his big toenail   
I think that was it anyway!!!!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Lighter
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 06:29 PM

The songs about "Dan, Dan" are folk versions of the famous 1840s minstrel song, "Old Dan Tucker":

Old Dan Tucker was a fine old man,
Washed his face in a frying pan.
Combed his hair with a wagon wheel,
Died with a toothache in his heel.

Evidently the original appealed jus as much to kids 150 years ago.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: beetle cat
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 11:36 PM

oh man.
Laura, thats a pretty harsh version of that counting out rhyme.
I knew it as;

'Ip dip dog shit
(I say you're it!)'

but my favorite counting out rhyme of all time was

(person 1) my mother punched your mother, what color was the blood?
(person 2, the person it lands on, states a color. for example, if they say purple, the 6th person in the circle is out cause there are 6 letters in purple)


Animaterra
I loved the miss Susie one, but I remember it as miss Lucy.

and also, the telephone song.. something like;

1:          hey (name)
chorus: someone's callin' your name!
1:          hey (name)
chorus: and I hear it again!
             there's someone on the telephone,
(name): if it isn't (new name) tell 'em I'm not home!

and on and on and on and on. we could do that for hours.

another favorite was the Lamb Chops theme song.
"some people started singing it not knowing what it was...."

but don't think that these fun songs stop as soon as you leave elementary school!!!!
I'm learning tons of new obscene songs at the University!

(B double E double R U N- BEER RUN... etc..)

or..
heres to (name) she/he's too blue
he's a pisspot through and through
he's the devil so they say
tried to go to heaven but he went the other way!!!..

Im wondering if it will ever stop..
extended education is just an excuese for extended immaturity and obscenity.

but not to worry folks, the tradition is alive and well.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 04 - 08:54 AM

Here's one I recall

Georgie Porgie Pudding and Pie,
Kissed the girls and made them cry.
When the boys came out to play,
Georgie Porgie ran away.

I also recall a ball bouncing game with this rhyme

one two three oleary,
Charlie is my sisiters dearie...
bounce up, bounce down,
off the wall and spin around.
One two three oleary,
Charlie is my sisters dearie.


There was also one that began

Keep the kettle boiling,
don't be late..

but I cannot remember the rest..it was a skipping rhyme.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Paul Burke
Date: 15 Dec 04 - 10:01 AM

OK, someone has to post it:

Pus and matter custard,
Green snot pie,
All mixed up with a dead dog's eye,
Slap it on a butty
Nice and thick
And wash it all down
With a cup of cold sick.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Leadfingers
Date: 15 Dec 04 - 11:04 AM

We still sing Welia Welia Walia at Irish gigs - Usually get good audience response too ! Children always did have a strange sense of humour !


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,joe_f
Date: 15 Dec 04 - 09:09 PM

celticblues:

When I was little, in California, 1940s, the first dirty song that every little boy learned was



There's a place in France

Where the women wear no pants

And the men go round

With their wienies hanging down.



I gather that it was pretty universal in the U.S. Once I was at a circus, and at the end of one of the acts all the elephants defecated in unison. Meanwhikle, the band played the tune of the above song, and I immediately understood that that was appropriate for the dirty part.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Cruiser
Date: 05 Jan 05 - 05:36 PM

This is a song my girlfriend used to play on her piano and sing when we were in grade school, often just before we walked to school together (way back in the 50s).

Doctor, doctor, can you tell
What will make poor Ronnie well?
He is sick and going to die
That will make poor Nancy cry.

Nancy, Nancy, don't you cry.
He'll get better by and by,
A bottle of ink to make him stink
A bottle of wine to make him shine


Does anybody know the melody of this ditty and what song it was derived from, if any?

Cruiser


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 05 Jan 05 - 06:35 PM

Cruiser,

You may be thinking of the Wallflower rhyme.

In "Play Songs of The Deep South" Altona Trent Johns, 1944
tthere's a version called "Water-Flower" The first verse is completely different:

1st verse: Water-flower, water-flower
          growing up so tall
          All the young ladies must surely, surely die
          All except 'Lindy Watkins,
          She is everywhere=
          The white folks say, the white folks say,
          Turn your back and tell your beau's name.

end of quote--
But the second verse of that song has the verse you quoted:

2nd verse Doctor, doctor, can you tell
          What will make poor 'Lindy well?
          She is sick and 'bout to die
          That will make poor Johnnie cry.

end of quote

As you can see that's the same as yours except for the change in names. Now if your name is Ronnie and your sister's name is Nancy that would account for the name changes...

"Water-Flower" has a different ending than the one you gave:

3rd verse Marry marry, marry quick!
          'Lindy, you are just love sick!

4th verse Johnnie is a ver' nice man,
          Comes to the door with hat in hand,
          Pulls off his gloves and shows his rings,
          "Morrow is the wedding-day.
---
"Water-flower" is described as a pantomine ring {cicle} game with one girl in the middle; a boy is said to act out the role of the doctor {This was before Women's Lib} and the doctor selects the boy whose name 'Lindy had mentioned to come into the center of the ring and act out the role of "Johnnie".
---

This is the first time I've seen or heard your "a bottle of ink to make him stink/a bottle of wine to make him shine" verse.

I remember this teasing rhyme from my chikdhood {1950s)
Ink a bottle of ink.
somebody let out an awful stink.
It was Y-O-U!

end of verse

That may have been because someone really had "let out wind", but not always. "Ink Stink" was also used as a counting out rhyme. According to my daughter who is a second grade teacher, the verse is still being used both ways.
--

There are A LOT of other children's rhymes with the "Momma Moma I feel sick" verses. The oldest one I found was 'Old Aunt Dinah sick in bed/called the doctor and the doctor said/get up Dinah, you aint sick/all you need is a hickory stick! {source either Scarborough "On The Trail Of Negro Folk Rhymes" 1927, or Talley "Negro Folk Rhymes", 1922.

Also I know there was at least one other thread where the Wallflower rhyme is discussed. Perhaps someone will put up that link..






thfrom The South that tdthe old book from te
I believe you are ttalkin There are also a lot of "ink stink a bottle of ink" children's rhymes also.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 05 Jan 05 - 06:57 PM

sorry about that junk at the end.

My New Year's resolution is to use the Preview feature...


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Cruiser
Date: 05 Jan 05 - 08:42 PM

Azizi,

Thanks for the information. I remember the third verse now that you wrote it:

3rd verse Marry marry, marry quick!
          Ronnie, you are just love sick!

I remember my girlfriend playing that third, final verse fortissimo, almost banging on the keys. I did not recall the words until you posted them, probably because that was some 46 years ago.

Cruiser


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Snuffy
Date: 06 Jan 05 - 07:00 PM

Azizi,

See here WATER WATER WALLFLOWER 2 for 6 or 7 versions collected in Scotland.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Jan 05 - 09:11 PM

Cruiser,
Glad to know that was the right song! O'm glad I could help.

Thanks, Snuffy for the links. It's interesting how rhymes travel across the world and take on cultural baggage as a result of that travel..
--
Warning: Here's a little bit of serious talk..

I'm one of those adults who wonder what rhymes say about the self-concept, interpersonal relationship, world view, values, attitudes, expectations, and concerns of children in general or of a specific child.

But I don't think children consciously think about any of this. I believe that children "sing" rhymes and do handclap, jump rope and other movements while reciting rhymes because they like doing so.

And maybe my interest in rhymes is a reflection of the fact that I'm still a child at heart.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 06 Jan 05 - 09:43 PM

Circa mid 50's

Mixed - Military Brats - chant overseas Asia:

Hey, Hey get out of my way.
I just got back from the U.S.A.

Same era, west-coast USA
More a playground prank than song -

There was a popular radio cigarette-commercial:
Winston Tastes Good
Like a Cigarette Should.

You would walk up to the dupe and ask, "For a penny, Bet you can't give me the first line of a cigarette commercial! The dupe would reply, Winston tastes good. The perpetrator would then hand over a penny.... pull out the waist-band of his trousers and say, "HEAR that WINSTON?????"

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Jan 05 - 11:40 PM

Gargoyle:
Now that's dirty, old man..

At least I think you're a man...and maybe you're old in age
and sometimes you come across old in wisdom in a wise crackin way...
I guess you want people to 'guess' about you..

That's cool..I think I'm going to look up what a "gargoyle" is and what a "gargoyle" does..

--
And back to the thread's subject:
My step daughter told me that when she was 8 or 9 in the mid 1970s in Indianapolis, Indiana, she and other girls would link arms and walk down the sidewalk chanting the exact same lines that Gargoyle gave:

             Hey! Hey!
             Get out of the way.
             I just got back
             to the USA!

She said they would make people move out of the way. It was a way of having fun and [maybe]asserting their power...
--

In 1998 I collected a chant called "Beware" from girls 7-9 year old in Pittsburgh PA. Another daughter of mine also remembers this chant from the early to mid 1980s in Pittsburgh. It's possible that boys may also chant this rhyme, and maybe perform it. In 2001, my oldest grandson, then 8 years old, overheard me ask his mother {my daughter-in-law] what rhymes she knew. When she started chanting "Beware",
he joined right in, saying the exact same words. But he didn't admit to using it with his friengs to block people from walking down the sidewalk.

And the words to "Beware" are:

BEWARE
Beware.
Ready. Set. And go.
Beware.
We comin through.

No one can stop us.
Not even you

We have the power
to overall. *
1-2-3.
So beware!

* 'Overall' may mean 'overrule'. Or it may mean 'to roll over all {everyone}'.
--

Is this chant familiar to anyone?


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 07 Jan 05 - 01:16 PM

CORRECTIONS:

I just read over my notes to the "get out the way rhymes" that I've collected over time.

I had remembered correctly the words that my daughter Jozita gave me for "Hey! Hey! Get Out The Way".

But with regards to the "Beware" chant, I should have written that the words "Beware/ready. set. go" serve as an introduction to that chant. According to the notes I had written in 1998, that introduction isn't always used, although it was recited by several girls who chanted the rhyme for me taht year.

And my memory really paid tricks on me when I wrote that my daughter, Tazi, my daughter-in-law, Toya, and her son Montel had also recited "Beware." Actually, they recited a completed different
"get out the way" chant. Here's the words to "WE DON'T STOP FOR NOBODY" as recited by my daughter in 1997 from her memory of Pittsburgh, Pa in the early 1980s:

We don't stop for nooobody
Can you dig it.
Woo!
Can you dig it.
{repeat words continuously while linking arms and walking down the sidewalk}

The words "Can you dig it" was not said as a question.
--

In 2001, I received a very similar version of this chant from Toya. She remembers this chant from the mid 1980s {Pittsburgh, PA}.
Instead of repeating the "Can you dig it" line, Toya recited the last line as "Are you with it". During that same visit, Montel unexpectedly joined his mother in reciting this chant. His version was basically the same as his mother's. The only difference between the two versions was that Montel chanted the 2nd line as "Can you get it".

It's possible that these slightly different versions are the result of faulty memory. But if children really did say "Can you get it" ,
I wonder if the change was made because by 2001 the once popular saying "Can you dig it" had long since been retired from regular use- in Black neighborhoods anyway.

I guess we'll never know...
--

Again, sorry for MY faulty memory. This shows the importance of having and referring to back up notes and other documentation-like sound recordings or visual recordings-when trying to collect, preserve, and share examples of rhymes.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,my baby
Date: 17 Jan 05 - 09:04 PM

Oh my baby just kick, oh my baby just kick
time for the baby to come,time for the baby to come
is it a girl? is it a boy? is it a twin? is it a triplet?                                  (pick aboy or a girl)
it's a _____ !
how many mouths? how many years?                  
1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11......             (pick the mouth or year)
What letter should the name start with?
A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z
                                          (pick a letter)
And i name ______                         (pick a name)
and that's my baby


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Jenny
Date: 30 Jan 05 - 07:32 PM

Hi, I'm only 18..about to be 19 and I remember using all sort of jump rope rhymes when I was a little kid. That really wasn't that long ago. You would be surprised how many of the same rhymes have survived the years and changed and evolved only ever so slightly over the ages.
For example..."Fudge Fudge tell the Judge" probably spawned the hand clap rhyme I remember that went...
"Scooby Doo (clap clap)
Where are you? (clap clap)
If a boy had a toy
and a girl had a curl
you could wrap it up in tissue paper
send it up the elevator
First grade says stop (pause)
Second grade says stop (pause)
Third grade says you better not stop cause
S-T-O-P spells Stop! (at this point all clappers freeze and see who unfreezes first)"
I think thats another difference...we had jump rope rhymes...but more often ...we had hand clapping rhymes.
We had one that was something about someone who "put ants in my pants/ made me dance/ kicked me off the bus/ made me cuss/ all the way to Toys R Us"
There was also
"I went to a Chinese restaurant
to buy a loaf of bread bread bread
He wrapped it up in foil
and this is what he said said said
My name is
Nee eye Nee eye
Nick a nye nick a nye
pom pom poodle
willy wally whiskers (repeat twice)
chefboyardee FREEZE! (clappers freeze and see who unfreezes first)"


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 30 Jan 05 - 10:32 PM

Guest My Baby, & Guest Jenny

I just read your comments and want to welcome you to Mudcat Cafe.

Thanks for posting those rhymes!

Hopefully, since you've found this page of street rhymes, you'll come back and see this post. May I ask you to share with us how these rhymes are played {for instance- are they said while doing handclap routines, jumping rope, to pick somebody or get eliminate them from being picked to be "It"? }. Also when you 'performed' these rhymes {such as in the 1990s' or within the last three years etc}, who performed them {such as girls 5-12 years-and their racial or ethnic group? Would you also please let us know what city, state, and nation you're from?

Thanks!

PS: Guest, My Baby-I never heard your rhyme before. When you pick a name and say it, is that the name of the next player, the name of somebody you know {such as a boy who the girl might like?} or is the name really one that the person wants to give to a baby who she will eventually have?

And Guest Jenny:

I just wanted to share with you that "Scooby Doo" is used in a rhyme [from Pittsburgh, PA-African American girls 5-12 years or so around 1990s to now] that starts like this:

Miss Sue,
Scooby Doo
Miss Sue from Alabama...

--
Also when I was growing up in New Jersey waaay back in the 1950s, we say She {He} got ants in her pants
and it makes her {him} dance
--
The rest of that rhymes sounds new...I like it!

I've heard the Fudge Fudge and Chinese restaurant rhymes before but your versions are different {which is great!}

Please share more rhymes with us!

Ms. Azizi


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Skeezyks
Date: 31 Jan 05 - 12:29 PM

I'm an elementary teacher from Minnesota. I'd like to add a hand clapping, patting game I learned from some first grade girls back in the 1970's. They claaed it "Billy Boy." As they chanted the lyrics they clapped their own hands, then the opposite hand of their partner, then their own opposite shoulders, and finally their knees.

"When Billy Boy was one (sung as two syllables) he learned to suck his thu-umb, (two syllables again.)
Thumb-dee-ah-dah, thumb-dee-ah-dah,
Half past one, cross down,

When Billy boy was two-o, he learned to tie his shoe-oo,
Two-dee-ah-dah, two-dee-ah dah,
Half past two cross down." etc.

three: climb a tree,
four: shut the door,
five: jump and dive,
six: pick up sticks,
seven: got to heaven,
eight: clean his plate,
nine: sing this rhyme,
ten: he learned to say, 'THE END!'"

Now, before I go, does anyone remember a silly campfire song named, "Adelina, Madelina?"

"Adelina, Madelina Whoops Diner Waffle Iron Hokum Stokum Pokum was her name.
She had two teeth in her mouth, one pointed north and the other pointed south."   etc.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 31 Jan 05 - 12:45 PM

One common when I was a youth in the Glasgow area in the years after the war,
Holy Moses I am dying
Just one wish before I go
If you see a German soldier
Stick a bayonet up his hole

to the tune of What a Friend we have in Jesus.
There were a lot of anti German songs around for quite a long time following the last world war. Not very PC or relevant these days of course, but historically interesting.
Giok


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Jenny
Date: 16 Mar 05 - 06:28 PM

There's a bit way back about 'Elvis presley, girls are sexy, sitting in the back seat drinking pepsi' and I remember that when I was eight (less than ten years ago) we used to sing that as part of a clapping game. It went

I went to a chinese bakers shop to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread
He wrapped it up in a five pound note and this is what he said, said, said, my name is...(elvis presely bit).

We also used to sing that susie song, (you know, the 'when susie was a baby...' only susie lost her bra when she was a teenager) and it went so far and then changed track to go 'down, down baby, down by the roller coaster, sweet sweet cherry, no place to go', but I don't remember really how it went. We did skipping games too, something about salt and pepper I remember. We also did variations on the chinese bakers shop one and played a lot of games like that. I've noticed me and my little sister learnt a lot of songs like that (like 'a sailor went to sea, sea, sea, to see what he could see, see, see) but my youngest sister didn't. I think it could be to do with a mixture of things. Even in the last ten years lots has changed and it's not cool to do things like clapping games and jump rope games, which I think it a shame.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 25 Mar 05 - 06:33 PM

Either through this thread or another Mudcat thread, I learned that an online communnity called Wheee! Blog had a great thread on children's rhymes.

So I visited that site, and have been periodically shared some examples of rhymes that I have collected.

Today I posted an invitation for that site's members and guests to come to visit us. And I specifically gave the link to this thread.

I'm sure if folks who learned about Mudcat from Wheee! Blog come
a-visitin, we'll extend them a warm welcome!

Here is the link again to that site's thread on children's rhymes:

Wheee! Blog

BTW, it appears as though some of folks who are posting rhymes on Wheee! Blog are teens or maybe even younger.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Barrie Roberts
Date: 26 Mar 05 - 07:28 AM

John's Glasgow verse from the War reminds me of one we sang in Hampshire in the 1940s. It went to the tune of 'My Old Man's A Dustman';

My old man's a dustman,
He wears a dustman's hat,
He shot down twenty Jerries,
Now what do you think of that?
One fell here, one fell there,
One fell round the corner,
One poor soul with a bullet up his hole
Kept crying out for water.
Water, water, water, water came at last,
I don't want your water so stick it up your arse.

I love these old traditional ballads of peace and brotherhood!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Guest, Star
Date: 27 Jun 05 - 01:40 PM

I remember one that goes:

I went to a Chinese restaurant
to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread
they put it in a brown paper bag
and this is what i said said said
My name is...
P I pickle eye, pom pom beauty, ice cream cutie
chinese, japanese, taiwan free
dirty knees, christmas trees, look at these

i know there has to be more between the ice cream cutie and chinese, but i can't remember what it was.. can anyone help?


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 27 Jun 05 - 05:36 PM

Star, here's a couple of versions of "I went to a Chinese Restaurant" that I have found or collected:

I went to a Chinese restaurant to buy a loaf of bread bread bread.
And when he put it in the oven, this is what he said said said.
My name is nee-ay nee-ay nicka nicka-lodeon pom pom poodle willy willy whisker
My name is freeze
(At that point we'd freeze and whoever moved was out.)
Source: Sarah Hrisak; Oil City, PA {mid 1990s}; email to Azizi
          Powell

****

I went ot a chinese returaunt to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread, the waiter asked what my name was and this is what i said, said, said...
my name is Eli, Eli, Chikali, Chikali Pom Pom beauty african cutie, i know karate punch you in the body oops! i'm sorry tell my mommy. don't wanna miss yah! don't wanna kiss yah! Chinese, japinese, indian chief!
Source: Posted By Kaitlin on Tuesday, February 17, 2004
http://www.streetplay.com/discus/cgi-discus/show.cgi?75/77.html

****

i went to a chinese reastraunt to get a loaf of bread bread bread, he asked me what my name was, and his is what i said said saiddd...---
my name is...ell-uh-lie ell-uh-lie, chick-a-lie chick-uh-lie, pom pom brady (or bigelow) i dont wanna miss (or kiss) you, chinese chopsticks, indian reeze!!! (freeze)
Source: posted by Trickster at January 17, 2005; Wheee! Blog

****

Also see two posts in this thread from Guest Jenny:

I went to a Chinese restaurant
to buy a loaf of bread bread bread
He wrapped it up in foil
and this is what he said said said
My name is
Nee eye Nee eye
Nick a nye nick a nye
pom pom poodle
willy wally whiskers (repeat twice)
chefboyardee FREEZE! (clappers freeze and see who unfreezes first)"   
Source: GUEST,Jenny- 30 Jan 05

and in her Jan. 30th post in this thread, Guest Jenny also alluded to the inclusion of the "Elvis Presley/Girls are sexy" rhyme added to

"I went to a chinese bakers shop to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread
He wrapped it up in a five pound note and this is what he said}

****

Here's a couple of versions of "Girls are sexy":

girls are sexy drink lots of pepsi
boys are rotten chew on sum cotten
ishy wishy lollypop
ishy wishy woo
ishy wishy lollypop
da guyz luv YOU
Source: {excerpt of a longer handclap rhyme} posted by Duilz at
October 28, 2004 Wheee! Blog

****
Boys are rotten
made out of cotton.
Girls are dandy
made out of candy
Boys that are beautiful
to get more stupider
Girls that are wilder
To get more milder
Boys drink beer
To get no where
Girls drink Pepsi
To get more sexy
Source: {excerpt of a longer handclap rhyme}; collected by
          Azizi Powell from elementary school age girls and boys;
          Clairton, PA, 1999}


****

Star, none of these may be the version you are trying to remember as I'm sure there are many more versions of this rhyme out there.

But I hope you enjoy them and post more rhymes that you remember!


Azizi


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,kerry
Date: 26 Aug 05 - 07:21 PM

Does anyone remeber the one that has I like coffee i like tea i like a black boy and he likes me so stand back white boys i know your shy I'll get a black boy to beat your behind he'll beat it rough he'll be it tough he'll beat it till you almost had enough. do you remeber what was first i remember it had have a peach have a plum have a stick of bubble gum bot peach no plum no stick of bubble gum. But something comes before that

kerry


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 26 Aug 05 - 08:12 PM

Hello Guest Kerry!

Once upon a time "I love coffee" [also called "Down Down Baby"} was used for jumping rope, but it nowadays it seems to be most often used for handclap rhymes.

Here are the standard words for that rhyme:

I love {or like} coffee
I love tea
I love the boys
and they love me

-snip-

Or the jumper would give a specific boy's name
{I like Johnny and he likes me}

Or the jumper would say:
I like coffee
I like tea
I want _____ to come jump with me *
* the girl or girls who the jumper wanted to join her jumping

I have collected a number of contemporary versions of this rhyme from various United States cities, and on other Internet discussion forums. What is interesting to me is how "I love coffee" now includes references to race and violence [like the version you share]when it didn't do so before. I'm not sure why this is.

****

"Take a peach, take a plum etc" is very common floating verse that is found in at least two different sub-groups of children's handclap rhymes. Here are two examples of the two subgroups that I'm referring to:

1st sub-group: {trading rhymes-one item after the other is defective}

Shake, shake, shake
Eeny meany
That's a queeny
Ooh ba Thumblina
Ah cha ca che Liberace
Oh baby I love you
Yes I do
Take a peach
Take a plum
Take a piece of bubble gum
No peach
No plum
Just a piece of bubble gum
Ooshe ahshe
Ooshe ahshe
I want a piece of pie
The pie too sweet
I want a piece of meat
The meat too tough
I want to ride the bus
The bus too full
I want to ride the bull
The bull's too black
I want my money back
The money's too green
I want a diamond ring.

Barbara Michels & Bettye White "Apples On A Stick",p 17
                (Coward-McCann, New York, 1983) collected in
                Houston, Texas


-snip-

2nd sub-group: "spying on your boyfriend" [often "caught you with your boyfriend" etc}

"Ziz Zag zag
take a piece take a plum
take a piece of bubble gum
do you like it?
do you love it?
do the alabama shake it
shake it up
shake it down
shake it all around
Spying on my boy friend - baby
didn't do the dishes - lazy
jumped out the window - crazy
and thats the facts of boys boys boys
        Source: http://octopuses.chaoticinsanity.com;
                Octoblog; "Schoolyard games" posted by Miranda R.;
                December 5, 2004

[note that "take a peach" is changed to "take a piece". This could
be a typo but may actually be the way the rhyme is said]

-snip-

I have also found an example of this rhyme that include verses from "I love coffee, I love tea":

take a piece, take a plum take a piece of bubble gum. no piece, no plum no piece of bubble gum. i like coffee, i like tea, i like the preety boy and he likes me so step back dumb boy, you dont shine, i'll meet you round the corner and beat your behind. last night, the night before, i met my boyfriend at the candy store. he bought me ice cream, he bought me cake, he bought me home with a stomach ache. i said "mama, mama, i feel sick. call the doctor QUICK,QUICK,QUICK! doctor, doctor before i die. i close my eyes and i count to five. 1..2..3,4,5 i'm alive." see that house on top of that hill? that's where me and my boyfriend live. cook that chicken, burn that rice. com on baby, lets shoot some dice!
Source: www.octopuseschaoticinsanity Octoblog; "Schoolyard games"
         posted by lesa at April 10, 2005

****

Enjoy!


Azizi Powell


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 26 Aug 05 - 08:27 PM

Here's another example of "I like coffee" that has references to race and violence:

Down Down Baby, Version 2
I remember
Down Down Baby Down Down the rollercoaster
Sweet Sweet Baby I'll never let you go
Shimmy shimmy cocoa puff shimmy shimmy I
Shimmy shimmy cocoa puff shimmy shimmy I
I like coffee I like tea
I like a colored boy and he likes me
so step back white boy
you don't cause a cool colored boy gonna bet your behind
He'll beat it once he'll beat it twice
He'll beat it beat it beat it
So let's get the rhythm of the head
Ding dong
Sho' got the rhythm of the head head
Ding dong
Let's get the rhythm of the hands
(Clap,Clap)
Sho' got the rhythm of the hands
(Clap,Clap)
Let's get the rhythm of the feet
(Stomp, Stomp)
Sho' got the rhythm of the feet
(Stomp, Stomp)
Let's get the rhythm of the Hot Dog (While doing the snake)
Sho' got the rhythm of the Hot Dog
Ding dong, clap,clap,stomp,stomp,Hot Dog
Source: http://www.mudcat.org/threads.cfm.
"I'm Rubber. You're Glue: Children's Rhymes"; posted by
GUEST,Pazzion; 26 May 05

-snip-

I've found very few children's rhymes that include references to
race. Contemporary versions of "I love coffee" consistently mention race. And I've collected about 10 different versions from the Internet, and from Pittsburgh area, New York City, Georgia, and Virginia that all have the same formula: the {Black?? or Puerto Rican, in the case of the New York City version} girl tells the White boy to step back or she will get a Black boy {or colored boy} to beat his behind. I've also collected one example in which the girl tells the White girl to step back or she will get a Black girl to beat her behind.

Again, I'm uncertain why this rhyme plays out this way...

One thing's for sure: these rhymes don't speak well about interracial interactions where these kids live.

We've got some serious work to do.


Azizi


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Belinda
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 03:36 PM

Diamonds, Rubies, Pearls and Aces
Keep the kettle boilin n leave no spaces.

We use to jump rope to this in the early 60's in Stow, Ohio. "Leave no spaces" meant as soon as one person left the double dutch jumping, another one in line had to jump right in behind her - without letting the rope come around again.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,A 70's Child
Date: 18 Sep 07 - 11:59 PM

Jump rope song

Down in the valley where the green grass grow
There lay (your name) sweet as a rose
She sang, she sang, she sang so sweet
Along come a man and kissed her on the cheek
Myyyy (your name)aren't you ashamed?
Kissing a boy without any name?
I'll tell Ma
And Ma'll tell Pa
And you get a whoppin by Grand, Grand MA
How many whoppins did she recieve?

These are counted as the rope turns


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,NoraB
Date: 26 Sep 07 - 11:58 AM

We used to sing

" i went to a chinese bread shop, to buy a loaf of bread bread bread
he wrapped it up in a five pund note and this is what he said said said
my name is elvis presley, girls are sexy, sitting in the back seat drinking pepsi
Girls go [something], boys go woo!"

Or

"My mummy told me
If I was goody
then she would buy me
a rubber dolly

My anuhtie told her
I kissed a soldier
Now she won't buy me
A rubber dolly"

skipping rhymes:

Salt, mustard, vinegar, pepper
High, low, medium, slow
forwards, backwards, dolly, stop!

and

Not last night but the night before
24 robbers came knocking at the door
As I went out
to let them in
this is the song they began to sing:

Spanish lady turn around
Spanish lady touch the ground
Spanish lady do a high kick
Spanish lady do the splits!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,J Bowen
Date: 28 Sep 07 - 10:45 PM

I remember Mary Mack, Miss Susie, Cinderella kissed a fella.

Then there was:
There's a place in France where the naked ladies dance.
There's a hole in the wall where the men can see it all.

Do you remember the one about Miss Susie called the doctor, the doctor called the nurse, the nurse called the lady with the alligator purse.

We sang the song about the bed bugs and the cockroaches playing a game of ball. I want to find all the lyrics to that song.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,A 70's Child
Date: 13 Oct 07 - 07:00 PM

The version I grew up on was a little more sexual than violent....


I like coffee,
I like tea,
I like the colored boy and he likes me,
So step back white boy you don't shine,
I'll get the colored boy to beat yo behind,
Last night, the night before,
I met my boyfriend at the candy store,
He bought me ice cream, he bought me cake,
He brought me home with a stomach ache,
Mama, mama, I feel sick,
Call the dictor quiick, quick, quick!
Doctor, doctor will I die?
Close your eyes and count to five,
1,2,3,4,5
See that house on top of the hill,
That's where me and my boyfriend live,
Take some chicken, fry the bread,
Come on baby let's get in the bed,
Come on baby let's do it again ahhh..


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Oct 07 - 05:06 PM

we had a few at primary school school,

(sorry to all spanish and french people we didn't mean anything by it)

all the girls in spain washed their knickers in champagne
all the boys in france did the hula hula dance
and the dance they do is enough to tie a shoe
and the shoe they tie is enough to tell a lie
and the lie they tell is enough to ring a bell
and the bell they ring goes ding-a-ling-ling!

we also had

my boyfriend gave me apples,
my boyfriend gave me pears,
my boyfriend gave me a kiss and a hug and threw me down the stairs
i gave him back his apples
i gave him back his pears
i gave him back his kiss and a hug and threw him down the stairs
i threw him over london
i threw him over france
i thrwe him over the U.S.A and he lost his underpants
i searched all over london
i searched all over france
i searched all over the U.S.A and i found his underpants

we also had

i walked into a chinese restuarant to by a loaf of bread, bread, bread
he wrapped it up in a five pound note and this is what he said said said
my name is elvis presley
girls are sexy
sitting in the back seat drinking pepsi
girls go kiss kiss
boys go yeah

we had tonnes of others aswell


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 18 Oct 07 - 06:18 PM

Thanks, Guest 18 Oct 07 - 05:06 PM for sharing those examples with folks here.

If you share some more {and I hope you do} please include where and when you recited them {where meaning what city & state if in the USA; or city, and nation if outside the USA}; when meaning what year {such as 2007, or the 1990s, or the 1980s}.

Also, while Guest can post on Mudcat, a Guest needs to chose a consistent screen name {such as GUEST children's rhymes}. If you don't choose a screen name to use with "GUEST".

Best wishes,

Azizi


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 18 Oct 07 - 07:27 PM

Sorry, let me try that again-

If you don't choose a screen name to use with "GUEST",your post may be deleted.

I hope to "hear" from you!

Ms. Azizi


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,boogie
Date: 11 Nov 07 - 11:34 PM

im trying to remember a "cheer" i used to hear as a child some of the previous ones ive read have come close but not enough to spark up nest alga (or how ever you spell it).
it goes

Imma nut
and a hut
i stole an apple from the tree
so what...


I cant remember the rest can anyone help me out?


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Jasmine
Date: 13 Nov 07 - 06:57 AM

Apples on a stick makes me sick makes my stomach go 246 boys boys havin lots of fun here come one with his finger up his bum he wibble he can wobble he can even do the splits but i bet he cant do this

i dont know the rest


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 13 Nov 07 - 09:25 AM

Guest Jasmine, I've heard and read a number of versions of the rhyme you posted. I'm not sure if I've posted these before, but in any event, here's some examples from my website: Cocojams

APPLES ON A STICK {Version #1}
Apples on a the stick
make me sick.
Make my heart go
Two forty six
Not because I'm dirty
Not because I'm clean
Not because I kissed a boy
Behind a magazine.
-multiple sources, including girls ages 7-10 years; Millview Acres Housing Development (Clairton, PA) 2002; collected by Azizi Powell, 2002; www.cocojams.com

**

APPLES ON A STICK {Version #2}
Apple on a stick makes me sick makes my heart beat 2-46 not because you're dirty not because you're clean not because you kissed the boy behind the magazine hey girls you wanna have some fun cause here come a lady with a big fat bum she can wibble she can wobble she can even do the splits but i bet ya i bet ya she can't do this close your eyes and count to ten if you muck it up you're a big fat hen. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 (if you didn't muck up) we didn't muck it up so that's the end. we're best friends. (if you did muck up) we mucked up and that's the end so start again cause we're not best friends.
-Allie; 2/15/2007 ; www.cocojams.com

-snip-

In some examples, "makes my heart go 246" or "makes my heart beat"
2-4-6 is also given as "makes my tummy go"

Also, Jasmine, instead of your line "with a finger up his bum", I've seen the line "here comes a lady with a big fat bum" or "here comes a boy with his pants undone".

Here's one ending that I've seen for this jump rope rhyme:

A lady on one foot one foot one foot a lady on two foot two foot two foot a lady on three foot three foot three foot a lady on four foot four foot four foot a lady on five foot five foot five foot a lady on six foot six foot six foot a lady no foot no foot no foot.
-De'Azia, age 8, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 3/24/2006 www.cocojams.com


-snip-

I remember doing that "Lady With One Foot" rhyme from my childhood in New Jersey {USA} in the 1950s.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Ezekiel
Date: 16 Nov 07 - 12:41 PM

I like it


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Lballinger
Date: 29 Nov 07 - 02:23 PM

I was looking for the second or more verses of a song my grandfather used to sing that went
"All the Girls in France,
They Wear Tissue Paper Pants" It sounds like it may have been related to some of the above posts.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 29 Nov 07 - 03:31 PM

GUEST,Lballinger,I agree with you that the lines you shared to the song your grandfather sung are similar to the "All The Girls In France examples posted above [such as in GUEST 18 Oct 07 - 05:06 PM's post]

However, since children's rhymes don't have any set words or order of words, it's not possible to really know the exact words and order of verses that your grandfather sung.

For what it's worth, I've never before heard or read a version of
"All The Girls In France" that included the line "They Wear Tissue Paper Pants".

Maybe someone else reading this has heard a version like that and will share the example that she or he knows here.

By the way, your post can serve as a reminder for folks to tape or video record-or at the very least-write down the words of rhymes & songs that their grandparents, parents, and other family members, school mates, and friends sing. Also, don't forget to write down the who, what, where, and when information about that recording/transcription.

In doing so, you will be preserving your childhood/family memories and also will be doing your part to record, preserve, and pass on cultural artifacts.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,julie
Date: 05 Dec 07 - 09:38 AM

We used to say one that went:

Say Say my Playmate, (clap, clap)
Come out and play with me (clap, clap)
And bring your dollies 3 (clap, clap)
Climb up my apple tree (clap, clap)
Slide down my rainbow (clap, clap)
Into my cellar door (clap, clap)
and we'll be jolly friends (clap, clap)
Forever more, more (clap, clap)
10-4 (clap)

Then there was:
Apples, Apples on a stick,
make me sick,
make my tummy go 2-4-6
not because it's dirty,
not because it's clean,
just because I kissed a boy
behind a magazine,
boys, boys have some fun
here comes the teacher with her mini skirt on
she can wibble, she can wobble
she can do the splits,
but i betcha 5 dollars she can't do this,
close your eyes and count to 10
and if you mess up start over again,
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
the end!

Then there was one about strawberry shortcake... can't remember that one at all for some reason.

then there was about billy boy
cross down when billy boy was 1
he learned to suck his thumb
thumb after thumb after half past one


2 was tie his shoe
3 was climb a tree
4 was shut the door
5 was swim and dive
6 was pick up sticks
7 was pray to Heaven
8 was shut the gate
9 was pay the fine
10 was say the end

and at the end it was
... end after end after half past ten
cross down the end.

then there was one about
cinderella dressed in yella
went upstairs to kiss her fella
made a mistake kissed a snake
how many doctors did it take?
1, 2 and so on until you missed at jumping rope


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,julie
Date: 05 Dec 07 - 09:44 AM

ok now i remembered the one with strawberry in it.. it wasn't strawberry shortcake... it went:

I am a pretty little Dutch girl,
As pretty as pretty can be,
and all the boys in the neighborhood,
go crazy over me,
My boyfriend's name is Tony,
He lives in the land of baloney (bologna I suppose we meant)
with baloney on his nose and baloney on his toes
and this is how my story goes,
One day as I was walking,
I heard my boyfriend talking,
To the pretty little girl with the strawberry curls,
and this is what he said to her,
I K-i-s-s kiss you
I L-o-v-e love you
I K-i-s-s kiss you
In the D-a-r-k Dark Dark Dark


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Drew
Date: 13 Dec 07 - 09:33 AM

do you remember the one that goes:

abc hit thats the way uh huh uh huh
i like it uh huh uh huh
thats the way uh huh uh huh
i like it uh huh uh huh

you got your way and i got mine
so peace punch captain crunch
brick wall water fall
girl you think you got it all
but you dont i do
so poof with the attitude

bang bang chu chu train

Whats the rest???


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 13 Dec 07 - 10:05 AM

GUEST,Drew, you asked what's the rest.

Here's three possibilities from my website: www.cocojams.com

Brickwall Waterfall (name) thinks shes got it all and she don't, I do. So backup with that attitude. Peace Punch Captian Crunch I got something you can't touch. Rieces Peices 7Up you mess with me I'll mess you up. Bang Bang Choo Choo train come on over I'll do my thang I know Karate I know Kung-fu mess with me I'll mess with you. Be gone, your breath is too strong, wait come back, I think you need a tic tac. Not one not two but the whole dang pack. Not a tic not a tac but the whole dang pack!!
-Cheerleading Babe; 3/11/2007

****

Brick Wall Waterfall girl u think u got it all but u don't I do so boom with that attitude peace punch captain crunch i got something u cant touch bang bang choo choo train wind me up while i do ma thang elbow elbow wrist wrist CRY NOW GIRL you just got DISSED!
-shorty ; 4/29/2007

****

brickwall waterfall girl you think you got it all you dont i do so POOF with that attiude chris cross captain crunch i got something you cant touch bang bang choo choo train wind me up i'll do my thang recess peaces 7up mess with me i'll mess you up POOF be gone your breath is way to strong wait come back i think you need a tic-tac sorry to be mean but you need some listerine not a drop not a girgle but the whole dang bottle elbow elbow wrist wrist shut up girl you just got dissed!!!!
-kendal; 5/23/2007

-snip-

There are many other possibilities...


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Chris McCann
Date: 31 Mar 08 - 11:13 PM

One I remember from my childhood in Belfast in the 50s was:
Pancake Tuesday is a holiday.
If we don't get off, we'll all run away.
Where shall we run?
Down the wee lane.
Who should we meet, but the teacher with the cane.
What shall we do?
We'll chop her up in two & leave her at the hospital at half past two! (? not totally clear in the memory department on the last half of the last line!)

One of the skipping songs - one person either end of rope turning it while others jump in & jump rope - I remember:
I had a little motor car, P46.
I drove it round the corner..........And slammed on the brakes!
(At "round the corner", the skipper jumped out of the rope, around the person turning rope & back in on the other side. At, "slammed on the brake", the skipper had to jump & land, catching the rope under foot.

I'm sure many more will come to me. There always seemed to be a song for everything in Belfast


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: paula t
Date: 01 Apr 08 - 07:18 PM

In Lancashire in the 60s and early 70s there were lots of songs for clapping games and skipping etc. Most of them have faded from my mind, but here are a few....

Queenie O'Cocoa, who's got the ball?
Queenie O'Cocoa, who's got the ball?
I haven't got it. It isn't in my pocket.
Queenie O'Cocoa , who's got the ball?



A sailor went to sea sea sea,
To see what he could see see see.
But all that he could see see see,
Was the bottom of the deep blue sea sea sea.


I used to play the old banjo and rest it on my knee,
But now the strings have broken down it's no more use to me.
I took it to the menders shop to see what he could do. He said the strings have broken down,It's no more use to you.
(this song was sung by adding a strange effect to the words, in an attempt to sound like a banjo e.g" I ululused to playlaylay the ololold banjololo and relelest it ololon my kneeleeleeleeleeleelee...."We thought we were very clever!)

Sigh...We really knew how to live in those days.


,


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Bert
Date: 01 Apr 08 - 07:40 PM

One two three O'Lairy
My ball's down the airey
Don't forget to give it to Mary
Not to Charlie Chaplin.

Green Gravel, green gravel
your grass is so green
my Father's a farmer on yonder green
with plenty of money to dress me in silk
so come along Charlie and marry me.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Bert
Date: 01 Apr 08 - 07:49 PM

In 1944 the soldiers went to war
they used their bums instead of guns
in 1944.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,baby louise
Date: 28 Apr 08 - 06:27 PM

a song we always used to sing (another version of i went to a chineses resterant)

I went to a chinese resterant to buy a loaf of bread-bread-bread
He wrapped it up in a £10 note and this is wat he said-said-said
My name is elvis preisly
girls are sexy
sittin on the back seats
drinkin pepsi
had a baby
named it daisy
showed it to a lady
she went crazy
joined the nazy
boys go kiss kiss
girls go woah (at which point we wud lift up our skirts or do a front handspring)

(sori about any spellin mistakes am dyslexic)


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 28 Apr 08 - 07:20 PM

baby louise, thanks for posting that example. That's an interesting one. I've not read that version before.

Best wishes,

Ms. Azizi


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 18 May 08 - 12:27 PM

Guest, Chris McCann, if you happen to read this, I took the liberty of reposting your example about Pancake Day on this Mudcat thread
thread.cfm?threadid=67287&messages=29#2343654 BS: Damn! I missed my pancakes:-(

I also took the liberty of reposting your example on my website page about Teacher Taunts: http://cocojams.com/teacher_taunts.htm

**

Before reading your example, I had never heard of Pancake Day. But thanks to you and thanks to This wikipedia page about Shrove Tuesday, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrove_Tuesday, I now know that Pancake Tuesday is the name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, the same day that some people call Mardi Gras. And now I also know why that day is called "Pancake Tuesday"-because people make pancakes on that day to use up rich ingredients such as eggs, milk, and sugar before the beginning of fasting for Lent. Also, I learned that the "most famous pancake race, at Olney in Buckinghamshire, has been held since 1445.[In that race] contestants, traditionally women, carry a frying pan and race to the finishing line tossing the pancakes as they go. As the pancakes are thin, some skill is required to toss them successfully while running. The winner is the first to cross the line having tossed the pancake a certain number of times."

-snip-

Imagine that! It's a wonder what you can learn on Mudcat, and on other Internet sites.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Anonymous
Date: 21 May 08 - 10:35 PM

Apple cider makes me sick. Makes my heart go 2-4-6. Not because I'm dirty, Not because I'm clean, Just because I kissed a boy behind a magazine. Hey girls, let's have some fun. Here comes Johnny with his pants undone. He can wibble he can wobble he can even do the splits But I betcha fifty dollars that he can't do this. Now close your eyes and count to ten, if you screw up start over again.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Miguel M
Date: 16 Jun 08 - 09:56 PM

Allen,

This is what I remember from that song:

I was standing on the corner, doing no harm. Along came a copper, who took me by the arm. He took me to the corner and rang a tiny bell. Along came a wagon, that took me to my cell.

As I lay sleeping, I drew upon the wall. The bed bugs and the roaches, where having a game of ball. The score was six to nothing. The roaches were ahead. The bed bugs hit a homer and knocked me out of bed . . . hey!

morgmen@comcast.net


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,unknown
Date: 27 Jun 08 - 06:19 PM

this is are version:

apple on a stick makes me sick, makes my heart beat far too quick. girls and boys having fun here comes *name here* with a big fat bum. she/he can wibble she/he can wobble she/he can do the splits but bet you 50 dollors he can't do this. close your eyes and count to 10 if you go wrong then start again. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 we didn't muck it up so were best friends.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 28 Jun 08 - 01:01 PM

Nice little collection of Australian kids songs (all rude) entitled, 'Shocking, Shocking, Shocking.
A friend of mine who used to visit schools and talk about theatre told me of the time he asked permission of a headmaster to record some children's songs.
He set the tape-recorder up in front of the class and one-by-one they came up and sang or recited their polite pieces into the microphone and went back and sat down.
After a while he decided on a fresh tack so, with the permission of the teacher he placed the recorder inside a walk-in cupboard with a blanket over the door so the kids could do their thing in relative privacy, left the tape running while he and the teacher disappeared to the staff room for a cup of tea.
They returned some time later to find the tape full of songs and rhymes which would out-Burns The Merry Muses of Caledonia.
My own favourite of the genre was a rhyme recorded by a friend from East London, from one of his daughters
Poor Little Sparrer, poor little fing,
No fevvers on its 'ed, no fevvers on it's wing,
Can't fly, can't sing
Useless barsted
(or alternatively)
Cut its bleedin' ed orf.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,kittymcc
Date: 18 Jul 08 - 10:18 PM

my mother and your mother
were hanging up the clothes
my mother socked your mother
right in the nose
what color was the blood


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Shelby
Date: 27 Nov 08 - 08:50 PM

My mother, your father lived across the street
Eighteen, nineteen Broadway street
Every time they had a fight this is what they said st night
Boys are rotten made out of cotton
Girls are sexy made out of pespi
Boys go to Jupiter to get more stupider
Girls go to college to get more knowledge
Mumble mumble clap clap
Mumble mumble stomp stomp
Mumble mumble kick kick
Mumble mumble jump jump
Mumble mumble freeze
5,6,7,8
To the front
To the back
To the side
To the Side
Front
Back
Side to side
Let me see you butterfly
Turn around
Touch the ground
Let me see you break it down

This of course looks so much better with the hand movements!!!!


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Subject: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Dec 08 - 08:32 PM

Miss Susie had a steam boat
the steam boat had a bell
Miss Susie went to heaven
and the steam boat went to...

Hell.o operater
connect me number 9
If you disconnect me I'll kick you from...

Behind the frigerater
there was a peice of glass
Miss susie sat upon it
and broke her little...

Ask me no more questions
tell me no more lies
the boys were in the bathroom zipping up there...

Flies were in the meadow
the bees were in there hive

Miss susie and her boyfriend were kissing in the
D-A-R-K
D-A-R-K
dark, dark, dark


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 11:42 PM

i thought i learned it like this:
(it was a hand game)

(see see?) my playmate,
come out and play with me,
and bring your (jolly?) seed,
climb up my apple tree,
slide down my rainbow,
into my pot of gold,
and we'll be jolly friends,
forever more,
1-2-3-4, (clap clap),
when i was younger,
i used to play with toys,
but now i'm oold-er,
i play with
b-o-y-s,
boys boys boys boys,
boys boys boys boys,
criss-cross,
apple sauce,
do me a favor and
get,
lost.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Emma
Date: 18 Jan 09 - 08:43 PM

In Belfast in the 90s we had one called Firecrackers, we must have been about 8.

Firecrackers *left legs and clap hands under knees*
Firecrackers *left legs and clap hands under knees*
Boom-ity Boom *shake body*
Firecrackers *left legs and clap hands under knees*
Firecrackers *left legs and clap hands under knees*
Boom-ity Boom *shake body*
The boys've got the muscles *flex muscles*
Teacher's got the brains *point to head*
Girls've got the sexy legs and we win the game *right leg forward*
Pepsi cola *rub stomach*
Coca cola *rub stomach other way*
Hypnotise and *put one hand on the ground*
Paradise *put other hand on the ground*
Fall in
LOVE *handstand*

Also had Mickey Marley's Roundabout and My Aunt Jane, Dusty Bluebells, You'll Easy Know a Weaver etc.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Azizi
Date: 18 Jan 09 - 10:23 PM

GUEST,Emma, thanks for sharing that example. Thanks also for including performance instructions!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Caroline
Date: 22 Jun 09 - 01:00 AM

There's a place on Mars where the women smoke cigars
and the men wear bikinis and the children drink martinis
every breath you take is enough to kill a snake
when the snake is dead you put diamonds on his head
when the diamonds crack you put mustard on his back
when the mustard fades you call the king of spades
and the king of spades says STOP!

- - -

Repeat each line

The prettiest girl (repeat)
I ever saw (repeat)
was sippin ci- (repeat)
-der through a straw (repeat)

I asked her if (repeat)
She'd show me how (repeat)
to sip that ci- (repeat)
-der through a straw (repeat)

so cheek to cheek (repeat)
and shin to shin (repeat)
we sipped that ci- (repeat)
-der through a straw (repeat)

then suddenly (repeat)
that straw did slip (repeat)
so we sipped ci- (repeat)
-der lip to lip (repeat)

the moral of (repeat)
this little tale (repeat)
is sip you ci- (repeat)
-der through pail (repeat)

In all honesty, neither of the rhymes make much sense, but whatever, they get stuck in your head.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Sailor Ron
Date: 22 Jun 09 - 06:58 AM

My late mother used to sing this as a little girl, she was born in 1910.

Pancack Tuesday's a very happy day
If we don't get a holiday we'll all run away.
Where will you run to?
Down Copp Lane,
Here comes the Master with a big fat cane.

then shouted
Eating pancackes, cracking nuts
Shovelling pancakes down us guts!

Copp Lane was the lane behind the Testimonial School in Fleetwood, the town's oldest school, and in the mid 19C, Shrove tuesday was a school holiday, but not when my mother was a little girl, I don't know how old this ditty is but I'd guess late 19C.   Ron


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 08:41 PM

this is a song my mother remembers from her childhood (1950s),


"Oh Katarina
Oh Katarina
to win my love
you must get lean-a
there's so much of you
two could love you!
join a gym
learn to swim
and always eat Farina!"

and she taught me this one as well

"whistle while you work
Hitler is a jerk
Mussolini has no weinie
and it doesn't work!"


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 12:16 AM

I'm a nut
I'm a nut
I stole an apple from the tree so what
I'm crazy
I'm foolish
I'm crazy I'm foolish I'm carzy I'm foolish so what (then u freeze)


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Nikki
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 01:29 AM

Sorry about my last post, it didn't go through right. I'm 18, so these are fairly good recollections, although I was never in the inner circle so some of these are a bit secondhand. I'll put the chant/rhyme in quotes, and then the performance instructions and such below that...

"Little Sally Walker,
Walkin' down the street
she didn't know what to do so
she stopped in front of me she said
Hey girl, do your thing, do your thing and switch
Hey girl, do your thing, do your thing and switch."

A group stands in a circle and Sally skips/walks/runs around the circle. at "She stopped in front of me" Sally picks a girl, stops in front of her, and during the first "Hey girl" bit does some kind of action. The ones I've seen ranged from cheer leading herkies, to dance moves, to jumping jacks. Then the girl who was stopped in front of switches places with Sally and repeats the action, and becomes the new Sally as the chant starts over again. We played this on our last day of 8th grade in Kansas, the year was 2006.
*******
A similar version, but more appropriate for both genders, which is why we switched to this one on that same day, once the boys wanted to join in and preferred not to be referred to as Sally.

"Ridin' ridin' ridin' my pony
ridin' ridin' ridin' my pony
ridin' ridin' ridin' my pony
and this is how it goes.
Front to front to front with my pony
back to back to back with my pony
side to side to side with my pony
and this is how it goes."

So during the "ridin" bits, the person gallops around the circle, stops in front of someone at the first "And this is how it goes" line. The rest is fairly explanatory...rub fronts, rub backs, rub sides, and switch places.
********
I always loved this one!! Girl Scouts all over have used this one for ages, as far as I can tell. some girls moved from Pennsylvania and when I tried showing them this one, they knew a variation on it.

"Down by the banks of the hanky-panky
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
Singin' ee uh pop puh eye uh pop puh oh uh pop puh pow!"

So the players sit in a circle, criss-cross-applesauce (is that term still in use??) with their knees touching. Everyone placed their hands palm-up on their knees...where two hands overlap, the right hand always goes on top and the left hand beneath it, both palms up. At the beginning of the chant, the first person smacks the palm to her left. That person slaps the next palm, and it continues around. Who ever is slapped on "Pow!" loses. There are variants on what to do with the loser...if the circle is large, they go in the center, but if it's smaller they can just sit outside. This continues until two people are left. These people hold each other's right hand, like shaking hands. They chant and move their hands back and forth (this is difficult to explain. The best way to illustrate it is to clench your right hand into a fist. Bend it horizontal at the elbow. Then punch straight out and back a few times.) If your hand is closer to you at the end, you lose. If it's closer to the other person, you win.
*******
This was a fun one, guaranteed to drive any bus driver or parent insane. For that reason, you could hear it for 50 percent of any long bus ride, especially the ones with only girls, like volleyball trips.

"There was a hole
in the ground,
the prettiest hole,
that you ever did see.
(quickly)the hole in the ground and the green grass grew all around all around, the green grass grew all around.
There was a tree,
in the hole,
the prettiest tree,
that you ever did see.
(quickly)the tree in the hole and the hole in the ground and the green grass grew all around all around, the green grass grew all around.
There was a limb,
on the tree,
the prettiest limb,
that you ever did see.
(continue with the same theme...now there's a limb on a tree in a hole and green grass)

Continue this theme for as long as humanly possible. Sometimes you inserted bark on the tree before the limb. For the fullest list I've ever come up with (this is in order of their verses)
**hole, tree, bark, limb, branch, twig, nest, egg, bird, feather**
and by the end you are going insane trying to remember everything.
**the feather on the bird and the bird in the egg and the egg in the nest and the nest on the twig and the twig on the branch and the branch on the limb and the limb on the bark and the bark on the tree and the tree in the hole and the hole in the ground**
During the main part of the verse, just sort of chant/sing, the tune is dum dum dum dee, dum dum dum doo, dum dum dum dee, dum dum dum doo. Then quit trying to sing and just say it as fast as you can. It's really funny.
******
Another song to annoy...this is one we didn't dare sing on bus trips, because at least the tree song has an end. Don't let small children see this, especially before a long trip.

"I know a song that gets on everybody's nerves, everybody's nerves, everybody's nerves
I know a song that gets on everybody's nerves, and this is how it goes." (repeat to infinity, or until the driver pulls over)

No idea where it originated. But so easy to annoy with!! I'm just at the border of understanding the annoyed parent and the giggling child, so I find it annoying but hilarious.
*********
Simplest jumping rhyme ever...

"Cinderella
Dressed in yella
went upstairs to kiss her fella
made a mistake
kissed a snake
how many doctors did it take?
1,2,3,4, etc"

As far as I can remember, the jumper's feet hit on the first syllable, and hit on every other syllable (CIN-der-EL-la DRESSED in YEL-la WENT up-STAIRS to KISS her FEL-la) and once you got to numbers, you counted the times the jumper's feet hit. So the jumper hit pavement sixteen times before the numbers.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: Cool Beans
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 10:50 AM

I can't believe I've never contributed to this thread. Oh well. Just the other day I recalled this one, to the tune of "Lulu Had a Steamboat," etc.

My father is a butcher,
My mother cuts the meat,
And I'm a little hot dog
That runs around the street.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,17yr old kid at heart:)
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 11:47 AM

candy stix make me sick make my heart go 246 not because im dirty not because im clean not because i kissed a boy behind a magazine hey girls lets have some fun here comes *name* with his pants undone close your eyes and count to ten whoever stops first has to ki-iss him.!

miss sue *clap-clap*
miss sue *clap-clap*
miss sue from alabma
her real is suzanna
sittin in the rockin chair
eatin them tacos watching the clock go
tic toc tic toc shawalla walla(x2)
ABCDEFG wash them cooties offa me
aboosha aboosha aboosha FREEZE.!

mrs.mary mack mack mack all dressed in black black black with silver buttons buttons buttons all down her back back back she asked her mother mother mother for 15 cents cents cents to see the elephant elephant elephant jump the fence fence fence he jumped so high high high he touched the sky sky sky and he never came back back back til the fourth of July ly ly


down by the river in the hanky pank where the bulldogs jump from bank to bank singing EIOU ya mamma stank and so do yuh ping pong donky kong 12345678910 whoever the 10 lands on is out this is a clapping game so if yur #10 yuh can move yo hand to keep from getting out and get some1 else out


Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn around.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the ground.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Tie your shoes.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
That will do.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Go upstairs.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Say your prayers.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn out the light.
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Say good night.

Cinderella, dressed in yellow
Went upstairs to kiss a fellow
Made a mistake
Kissed a snake
How many docotrs
Did it take?
{count until someone makes a mistake}

Ice Cream,ice cream,cherry,on top how many boyfriends do you got 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16..… cntinue til sum 1 messes up jumprope game


Divide the group of kids into two teams. The kids then form two lines holding hands and facing each other. The lines should be 30-50 feet apart. The team chosen to go first calls for a runner from the other line, saying, "Red Rover, Red Rover, let Thomas come over!" Thomas then takes off running and tries to break through the other line. If he breaks through, he chooses one of the kids that he broke through to take back to his team. If he doesn't break through, he has to stay with the other team. The game ends when everyone is in one line.


Miss Annie had a steamboat
the steamboat had a bell
Miss Annie went to Heaven
the steamboat went to
Hell-o
Operator,
give me number nine.
If you disconnect me
I'll kick your fat
Behind
the 'frigerator
there was a piece of glass.
Mary sat upon it
and broke her big fat
As-k
me no more questions
I'll tell you no more lies.
Tell that to your mother
the day before she dies.
The boys are in the bathroom
pulling up their
Flies are in the playground
Bees are in the park
The boys and girls are having fun NFBSKing in the dark!


He rocks in the treetop all day long
huffing and a puffing and a singing that song
all the little birdies on jaybird street
love to hear the robin go tweet tweet tweet
rockin robbin tweet tweet tweet
rockin robin tweet tweet tweet
mamas in the kitchen cookin fried chicken
dadys in bed have way dead dead brothers in jail drinkin ginger ale sisters in the back singin fruit cocktail rockin robin.....

Double Double *make fists of your hands and tap the non-thumb side against the other person's twice*
This This *palms together twice*
Double Double *fists*
That That *back of hands together twice*
Double *fists*
This *palms*
Double *fists*
That *back of hands*
Double Double *fists*
This *palms*
That *back of hands*


popcoooorn on a train and lee-et *name* do her/his thang she said a oomp dad*day* oomp da*day* oomp da*day* oomp da*day*....repeat til every1 goes

This is a handclap/foot stomping cheer called Gigolo.
Gig-olo-o
Gig-Gig-olo-o
Gig-olo-o
Gig-gig-olo-o
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah!
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: what.?!
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: Well, my hands up high, my feet down low and thats the way I gigolo (does dance/motion of her own)
Group: Well, her hands up high, her feet down low and thats the way she gigolos (group repeats the unique dance/motion)
(Repeat with a new girl and new dance/motion.)

OOOORRR:

Gig-olo-o
Gig-Gig-olo-o
Gig-olo-o
Gig-gig-olo-o
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah!
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: what.?!
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: Well my back aint right my bra too tight my hips keep shakin from left to right and THATS the way I gigolo (does dance/motion of her own)
Group: Well my back aint right my bra too tight my hips keep shakin from left to right and THATS the wa she gigolos(group repeats the unique dance/motion)
(Repeat with a new girl and new dance/motion.)


INA LINA THUMBELINA TWO TIMES THUMBELINA IRIATCHEE LIRIATCHEE I LOVE YOU TAKE A PIECE TAKE A PLUM NOT A PIECE OF BUBBLEGUM I LIKE COFFEE I LIKE TEA I LIKE A BLACK/WHITE BOY AND HE LIKES ME SO STEP BACK WHITE/BLACK BOY YOU DONT SHINE IGOTTA A BLACK/WHITE BOY TO KICK YOUR BEHIND SEE THAT HOUSE ON TOP OF THAT HILL THATS WHERE ME AND MY BABY GNNA LEAVE WE GNNA CHOP SOME WOOD EAT SOME MEAT COME ON BABT LETS GO TO SLEEP

I SEE THE MOON AND THE MOON SEES ME THE MOON SEES SOMEBODY I WANNA SEE SO GOD BLESS THE MOON AND GOD BLESS ME GOD AND BLESS THE SOMEBODY I WANNA SEE


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,17yr old kid at heart:)
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 11:51 AM

OOPS I FORGOT LITTLE SALLY WALKER.! LOLZ........LITTLE SALLY WALKER SITTING IN HER SAUCER RISE SALLY RISE WIPE YA WEEPIN EYES SHAKE IT TA DA EAST-AH.! SHAKE IT TO DA WEST-AH.! SHAKE IT TO THE VERY ONE THAT YOU LOVE THE BEST.!*POINT TO THE PERSON*


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: PHJim
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 05:15 PM

Michael Cooney used to sing,
"I hate Bosco, It's so bad you see,
Mommy puts it in my milk to try and poison me
But I fooled Mommy, I put some in her tea.
Now I have no Mommy to try and poison me."

There's also:
"Hold the pickles, hold the lettuce,
Shut up Lady, don't upset us.
All we ask is that you let us
Throw it away"

and:
"MacDonalds is my kind of place.
Hamburgers in my face
French fries up my nose
Ketchup between my toes,
Mustard running down my back
I want my money back
Before I have a heart attack."


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,zari
Date: 06 Aug 10 - 10:44 PM

I recognize a lot of these both things my mother taught me as a child and then things I heard my own daughters sing.

I remember a couple of extra verses to rocking robin that were done as a handclapping game

mama's in the kitchen cooking something sweet
papa's out hunting, shooting at some meat.
your brothers in prison, your sister walks the street
listen to the robin going tweet tweet tweet.

And another verse that some of the boys prefered:

Your father f---s your mother and
your mother f---s you
your sister does the dog
and she likes it too
all the little birdies on jaybird street
love to f--- the robin with his tweet tweet tweet.

And another one called shame shame shame

Shame shame shame
I don't want to go to Mexico no more more more
there's a big fat policeman by the door door door
if he grabs you by the collar
girl you're going to holler
I don't want to go to Mexico no more more more
Shame!

the last line is followed by an attempt to slap the other girls face while simultaneously dodging her slap.


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Brent
Date: 10 Sep 10 - 12:19 AM

From 1947: "Once upon a time when the goose drank wine while riding on a street car line, the street car broke and the monkey got choked, and they all went to heaven except the old nanny goat!"


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,ty
Date: 06 Jan 11 - 01:58 PM

grandma grandma sick in bed
Called the doctor n the dr. Said
Get up old lady! U aint sick
All you need is a pepperint stick
Hands up! Shake shake
Shake shake
Hands down. Shake shake
Shake shake
all around.Shake shake
Shake shake


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,nicky
Date: 20 Mar 11 - 12:54 PM

hi, my kids love doing handstands & I remember doing songs with mine when I was little, like going round in a circle & singing "take your doggie for a walk" then whilst doing a handstand saying "woof, woof". Unfortunately although there were loads of these back in the 1980's I can't remember them! Can anyone help as I'm having no luck on net???


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,nickyhorse
Date: 21 Nov 11 - 04:50 AM

Doesn't anybody remember the raunchy version of "Playmate?"

Oh little Playmate
I cannot plat today
It happened yesterday
The boy across the way
He gave me fifty cents
To lie across the fence
He said it wouldn't hurt
I felt it up my skirt
My Mommy was surprised
To see my belly rise
My daddy was surprised
To have me hospitalized...

Harry! Look what you've done to me!
Harry! You'll have to marry me!
Harry...We'll call him Larry,
And it'll be Harry, and Larry, and Me!


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Subject: RE: Children's Street Songs
From: GUEST,Neil panto.
Date: 24 Jul 12 - 07:45 AM

I remember girls playing this game and wonder have i got it right?
Wallflowers WALLFLOWERS GROWING UP SO HIGH
aLL THE YOUNG LADIES ARE ALL SURE TO DIE
eXCEPT (GIRL NAMED)SHE'S THE FAREST OF THEM ALL
sHE CAN DANCE SHE CAN SING SHE CAN TURN HER HEAD
TO THE WALL (SHE DOES THAT & SO IT CONTINUES UNTILL
THERE IS ONE GIRL REMANING....


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