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Lyr Req: Little Chickens in the Garden

DigiTrad:
CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN


Related thread:
(origins) Origin: Chickens in the Garden / Farmer's Daughter (20)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
All the Little Chickens in the Garden (from Dan Milner's book, A Bonny Bunch of Roses. Music transcribed by Paul Kaplan.)
The Little Chickens In The Garden [James A. Bland] (from the original sheet music, 1883)
The Little Chickens in the Garden (Randolph) (from Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs)


Dunc 04 Jul 02 - 01:11 PM
Malcolm Douglas 04 Jul 02 - 01:31 PM
Emma B 04 Jul 02 - 03:04 PM
Malcolm Douglas 04 Jul 02 - 04:00 PM
Dunc 05 Jul 02 - 06:18 AM
Mr Happy 05 Jul 02 - 09:12 AM
Joe Offer 10 Sep 03 - 10:13 PM
Joe Offer 10 Sep 03 - 10:34 PM
Joe Offer 10 Sep 03 - 10:50 PM
Joe Offer 10 Sep 03 - 11:02 PM
Joe Offer 11 Sep 03 - 12:01 AM
Joe Offer 11 Sep 03 - 01:35 AM
Joe Offer 11 Sep 03 - 02:51 AM
IanC 04 Jun 04 - 10:25 AM
Jim Dixon 08 Jun 04 - 09:30 AM
Jim Dixon 09 Jun 04 - 11:53 PM
GUEST,Gadaffi 17 Oct 05 - 05:58 AM
Malcolm Douglas 17 Oct 05 - 11:14 AM
GUEST,Gadaffi 17 Oct 05 - 11:43 AM
GUEST,The Kerryman 14 Oct 08 - 08:48 PM
Jim Dixon 16 Oct 08 - 09:13 AM
Deckman 13 Aug 09 - 12:04 AM
Barbara 13 Aug 09 - 12:19 AM
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Subject: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Dunc
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 01:11 PM

I'm looking for the words the a song I heard the Watersons sing
As far as I recall its title would be...
All The Little Chickens In The Garden
It was all to do with being left a farm, plus the animals and all the little chickens in the garden.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 01:31 PM

What you want to do is type chickens in the garden into the "Digitrad and Forum Search" which you may have seen on the main Forum Page. Hit "GO". One of the results you will get is

CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN

This is the DT file and, though no source is credited, it appears to be the Watersons' set with a few small typos and mis-hearings. They learned the song from Joe Udal at a shepherds' meet in the Lake District, around 1974.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Emma B
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 03:04 PM

When I was at Liverpool University in 1969, one of my fellow students sang an Irish version of the same song 'Treat me Daughter Kindly' Although I can't remember the lyrics with total recall they are rather similar but not identical


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 04:00 PM

The original song was written by the American songwriter James Allen Bland, who was also responsible for Golden Slippers. The title was originally The Farmer's daughter; or, The Little chickens in the garden. It found its way into tradition, and turns up localised to a number of places. Most commonly found in the USA and Canada, as you might expect; also in England and Ireland. Sheet music of 1883 can be seen at Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, 1870-1885:

Farmer's daughter, The; or, The Little chickens in the garden / by James Bland.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Dunc
Date: 05 Jul 02 - 06:18 AM

Thank you for your help. I did try searching in the Digitrad and Forum Search but drew a blank... hence I posted the thread.
I must have hit a wrong key somewhere along the line.
I will try to be more careful in future.
It was also good to get a bit of background info on what is a smashing wee song.
Thanks again.
Dunc


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Mr Happy
Date: 05 Jul 02 - 09:12 AM

there's a version called 'gobblers in the garden' by the kipper family- could be a bit of a turkey!


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Subject: ADD: Gobblers in the Garden (Kipper Family)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Sep 03 - 10:13 PM

Andy G posted this in another thread, buried in with some other songs. It's best to post only one song per message, and to put the song title in the title of the message. but I rescued the song, Andy, and it's all right now.



GOBBLERS IN THE GARDEN
(Kipper Family)

Well when first I wed me Norfolk girl, we all went back to Trunch
To drink a toast, and cut the cake, and have a bite of lunch
Now she and I was eager to start the honeymoon
But her father made a speech which went on half the afternoon
He told me:

CHORUS: Treat me daughter decent don't do her any ill
And when I go I'll leave you my smallholding in my will
I'll leave me muck heap and me silage me slurry and me swill
And all the great big gobblers in the garden

When finally he finished me eyelids felt like lead
So me and my new missus said we thought 'twas time for bed
In the coach I said I thought we'd never get away from him
But when we cuddled up the driver turned round with a grin
And he said: CHORUS

He drove us to our lodgings and he said cheerio
But I finally made him realise it was him that ought to go
And soon we lay together me wife say go to town
But my ambition withered when a window-pane flew down
This voice said: CHORUS

She said you've really got to laugh but I was proper riled
I was so fed up I couldn't even raise a smile
I couldn't see the joke at all. All I saw was red
For every time we kissed he'd call from underneath the bed
And he said: CHORUS

Now we've been married seven years and we've got three young pups
Well twice he went on holiday and once we tied him up
And every hour of every day his promises we've heard
Now me and my old twelve-bore think that's time he kept his word
His words are: CHORUS


Thank you, Andy G. that was inspiring. Wolfgang posted the entry from the Traditional Ballad Index in the other thread, but the thread didn't go very far after that. To keep everything together, I think I'll post it here.
-Joe Offer-

Treat My Daughter Kindly (The Little Farm)

DESCRIPTION: The singer meets and falls in love with a girl. Her father asks him to "Treat my daughter kindly, never do her harm. When I die I'll leave you my little house and farm." The two are happily married and live a contented life
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: c. 1897 (Hamlin's Wizard Oil Songbook)
KEYWORDS: courting marriage father
FOUND IN: US(MW,NE,SE,So) Britain(England)
REFERENCES (3 citations):
Randolph 668, "The Little Chickens in the Garden" (1 text plus a fragment, 1 tune)
BrownII 175, "The Farmer's Daughter" (1 text)
Warner 77, "Treat My Daughter Kindly (or, The Little Farm)" (1 text)

File: R668

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2003 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: ADD Version: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Sep 03 - 10:34 PM

TREAT MY DAUGHTER KINDLY (or, THE LITTLE FARM)

While traveling down in Yorkshire
Not very long ago,
I chanced to fall in love,
With a girl you all must know.
I told her if she'd come with me,
I would see her on her way,
And when I took her to her home
I heard her father say,
    Chorus
    "Treat my daughter kindly,
    Never do her harm.
    When I die I'll leave you
    My little house and farm,
    My horse, my cow, my pig and plow,
    And all my cocks and hens,
    And all yon little chickens in the garden."

Now when I went a-courting,
I was so blooming shy
I hadn't a blessed word to say,
If folks were passing by.
One night I met her all alone
And asked her to be my bride,
She said she would if I'd remember the words
I'd heard her father say,
Chorus

But now that we are wed
And keep a little farm,
My wife she is my only pride,
She is my only charm.
And when I tease and squeeze her,
She reminds me of the day
When first I took her home
And heard her father say,
Chorus

collected from Lena Bourne Fish, 1941

source: Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection

There is no tune in the book.

    Notes: This song, which is also known as "The Little Farm" and as "All the Little Chickens in the Garden," was sung to us by Mrs. Fish in Both Frank and I remember hearing it from other sources—probably when we were children in very different parts of the country. I have not been able to find out very much about it. There one version in Randolph from Springdale, Arkansas. The story is the same, although the words are quite different from those sung by Mrs. Fish—except for the chorus.
    Alan Lomax says his mother sang him the song when he was a child — a version almost exactly like the one found in Randolph.
    The mention of Yorkshire in Mrs. Fish's first verse has made us wonder if the song could have an English origin—perhaps English music hall. When we found it included on a topic recording by the Watersons we hoped to find that fact established. However, their notes say only: "Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson heard a man named Joe Udal sing this at a shepherds' meet in the Lake District in 1974, and took a fancy to it." We are still wondering.
    The song can be heard on a Library of Congress recording called "All the Little Chickens in the Garden." It was recorded in April of 1948 by Herbert Halpert from the singing of Mrs. Prudie Tillman of Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
    The recording Mrs. Fish made for us on a small disk in 1941 has been lost. Frank Warner knew the tune, but he is not here to sing it, and I cannot remember it well enough. We print the song, therefore, without a tune.
    See: Library of Congress field recording AFS 9745 B3;
    Randolph, Vol. 4, III;
    Topic Record No. 12 TS 265 ("for pence and spicy ale")


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Subject: ADD Version: The Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Sep 03 - 10:50 PM

We can't stop there. Here's the version from Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs:

THE LITTLE CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN

I once did know a farmer, a jolly good old soul,
Who used to do his work around his little country home,
He had a only daughter, to win her I did try,
And when I asked him for her hand, he made me this reply;
    Treat my daughter kindly, and do to her no harm,
    And when I die I'll leave to you my little house and farm,
    My horse, my plow, my sheep, my cow, my sheds and little barn,
    And all the little chickens in the garden.
I dearly love this darling girl, she says that she loves me,
And many a time I go to her house, this dear one for to see,
I watch her milk her father's cow, and view her every charm,
And many a drink of milk I get before I leave the barn.

The old man has consented and married we will be,
We'll run that little farm ourselves and live most happily,
I will use her well, his only child, and treat her kindly,
And try to keep the promise that the old man asked of me.

Manuscript copy from Mrs. Maggie Morgan, Springdale, Arkansas, February 9, 1942. Inscribed "The Farmer's Daughter," or "The Little Chickens in the Garden."
    Notes: Three stanzas and a chorus entitled "The Farmer's Daughter" appeared in Hamlin's Wizard Oil Songbook, Chicago, n.d., c. 1897. A very similar text is quoted by Mark Sullivan (Our times, New York, 1927, p. 181) without a title, and described simply as "a song to a son-in-law." See also Stout (Folklore from Iowa, Memoirs, American Folklore Society Vol. 29, 1936, p. 28). Irving Stone, in his biography of Jack London (Saturday Evening Post, July 9, 1938, p. 53) says that London sang a song called "Treat My Daughter Kind-i-ly" in 1894 or 1895. C. V. Wheat (Aurora, Mo., Advertiser, Dec. 5, 1940) prints four stanzas of a text called "The Farmer's Daughter," which he describes as "an old courting song, popular some three generations back."

Alternate chorus provided with tune (sung by Mrs. Guy Bosserman, Pineville, MO, Sept 3, 1924):
    Oh, treat my daughter kind-i-ly and speak of her no harm
    And when I die I'll leave to you my stock and little farm
    My horse, my cow, my sheep, my plow, my house and little barn,
    And all the little chickens in the garden.

Click to play


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Subject: ADD Version: The Farmer's Daughter
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Sep 03 - 11:02 PM

A FARMER'S DAUGHTER

I once did know a farmer, a good and faithful soul
Who used to work upon his farm around his cottage home.
He had an only daughter; to win her I did try,
And when I asked him for her hand, oh, this was his reply:
    Chorus:
    Treat my daughter kindly, and say you will do no harm.
    And when I die I'll leave to you my home and little farm,
    My horse, my plough, my sheep, my cow, my hogs and little barn,
    And all the little chickens in the garden.

She and I went for the cows, we went arm in arm;
We drove the cows together up to that little barn.
I watched her milk her father's cows, and viewed her every charm,
And many a drink of milk I got before I left that farm.

Oh, now the old man has consented and married we will be
We'll own the little farm ourselves, and live in harmony,
And try to keep the promise that the old man asked of me,
To use her, his only child, and treat her kindly.

'A Farmer's Daughter.' Obtained from O. L. Coffey of Shull's Mills, Watauga County, NC, in August 1939.

Source: The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore (Volume 2)


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE LITTLE CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN (Bland)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Sep 03 - 12:01 AM

OK, so here's the sheet music Malcolm linked to above.

THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER or THE LITTLE CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN
(James A. Bland)

I once did know a farmer, And he was a faithful soul,
He used to work upon his farm Around his country home;
He had an only daughter, And to win her I did try,
And when I asked her to be mine, The old man did reply:
    Treat my daughter kindly, And say you'll do no harm,
    And when I die I'll leave you both My little stock and farm;
    My horse, my cow, my sheep, my plow, My home, my pump, my barn,
    And all the little chickens in the garden.

I loved this young girl dearly, And I thought that she loved me,
And every evening I would go, Her lovely face to see;
And watch her milk her father's cow, In it I saw no harm,
and lots of fun I'd always have Before I'd left the barn.
CHORUS

Her father has consented, And we two will married be;
We'll own our little country home, And live in harmony;
No sorrow seems to hover o'er Our little cottage home,
For all is blithe and happiness, Although we live alone.
CHORUS

Songwriter: James A. Bland, who also wrote "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny"
Published in 1883, Oliver Ditson & Co

Source: Levy Sheet Music Collection and Library of Congress American Memory Collection

Click to play


Here's a brief biography of James A. Bland, apparently from World Book:
    James A. Bland (1854-1911), was a black American composer. In 1878, he published "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny." This song, with the name changed to "Carry Me Back to Old Virginia," was the state song of Virginia from 1940 to 1997. Bland's other well-known songs include "In the Evening by the Moonlight" and "Oh, Dem Golden Slippers." He also became popular as a banjo player and starred in a black minstrel company. He was born in Flushing, New York.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Sep 03 - 01:35 AM

OK, so I posted the tunes from Vance Randolph and from the sheet music, and neither one is the tune I'm familiar with. John in Brisbane posted another tune, which I moved from a generic thread to the other thread on this song. It's close to the tune I know, but with all due respect and affection for John in Brisbane, it's all messed up. Can anybody send me a really good transcription of the familiar tune. You know, the one Michael Cooney used, and the one Judy Cook uses?
Does Judy Cook sing this song?
-Joe Offer-
joe@mudcat.org


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Subject: ADD Version: All the Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Sep 03 - 02:51 AM

Well, wouldn't ya know it. I found the tune in a book written by a Mudcatter, Dan Milner (Liam's Brother), A Bonny Bunch of Roses. The lyrics are almost what's in the Digital Tradition, but I'll post them anyhow. There are a few parts I sing differently, but it's basically the tune I know.
-Joe Offer-

ALL THE LITTLE CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN

When first I come down Yorkshire, not many years ago,
Why, I met with a little Yorkshire girl and I'll have yez all to know
That she was so blithe, so buxom, so beautiful and gay.
Now listen whilst I tell you what her daddy used to say:
    "Treat me daughter decent. Don't do her any harm
    And when I die I'll leave you both me tidy little farm,
    Me cow, me pigs, me sheep and goat,
    Me stock, me fields and barn
    And all the little chickens in the garden."
When first I went to court the girl, she was so awful shy.
Why she never said a blummin' word while other folks stood by.
But as soon as we were on our own she made me name the day,
Now listen while I tell you what her daddy used to say.
'Treat me daughter decent...

And so I'll wed me Yorkshire girl so pleasing to me mind,
I always been proved true to her and she's proved true in kind.
We've had three bairns, they've growed up now with a grandun' on the way
And when I look into her eyes I can hear her father say.
'Treat me daughter decent...

Notes: One of the Watersons' most popular songs.
Collected from Joe Udall, a Cumbrian shepherd, in 1974 by Norma Waterson and Martin Carthy.
Source: The Watersons LP, For Pence and Spicy Ale

Click to play


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: IanC
Date: 04 Jun 04 - 10:25 AM

There's a late 19th Century broadside version at the new Scottish Library Broadside Ballads site ...

Chickens in The Garden

:-)


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Subject: Lyr Add: CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN (Dundee broadside)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Jun 04 - 09:30 AM

Here it is, copied from http://www.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14995/transcript/1

The National Library of Scotland was kind enough to provide us with a transcription of the broadside, typos, misspellings and all. I tarted it up a bit to make it correspond even more closely to the printed broadside.

THE CHICKENS
IN THE GARDEN.

~~~~~~~~~~
Thsi Popular song can alwase be had at Poet's Box
182 Ovegate Dundee
~~~~~~~~~~
NEW SONGS OUT EVERY WEEK,

I once did know a farmer, a good old jolly soul,
Who used to work upon the farm aroud his contry home
He had an only daughter and to win her I did try,
And when I asked hin for her hand these words he did re

CHORUS.

"Treat my daughter kindly, and say you'll do no harm,
And when I die I'll leave to you my little house and farm
My horse, my plough, my sheep, my cow, my hogs and
    l'ttle barn,
And all those little chickens in the garden.

I own I love this darling girl and dearly she loves me
I used to go aroud her home her smiling face to see,
To watch her milk her father's cows and admire her
    every cham,
And meny a drink of milk I got before I left the barn.

SPOKEN---Yes, and the old man would join hands
together, putting one of his own on each of our hands, he
would say, "God bless you little children; and young man
remember I'll brake your back if you don't a ways-
                            Treat my daughter," etc

Now the old man has consented and marred we will be
Wi'll own a little farm ourselves and live in harmony;
I'll use her well. his only child, and I'll treat her kindly
And I'll strive to keep the promise that th old man
    asked of me.

SPOKEN—And, oh. Lord! how his eyes used to twinkle
and how it used to tickle me every time I'd here him say.
    Treat my daughter," etc


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE LITTLE CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 09 Jun 04 - 11:53 PM

From The Library of Congress American Memory Collection:

THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER
or
THE LITTLE CHICKENS IN THE GARDEN.
Adapted by F. Louis. Music & words by James A. Bland. 1878.

I once did know a farmer, and he was a faithful soul.
He used to work upon his farm around his country home.
He had an only daughter and to win her I did try,
And when I asked her father wise, the old man did reply:

CHORUS: "Treat my daughter kindly, and say you'll do no harm,
And when I die I'll leave you both my little stock and farm:
My horse, my cow, my sheep, my plow, my home, my pump, my barn,
And all the little chickens in the garden."

I loved this young girl dearly and I thought that she loved me,
And ev'ry evening I would go her lovely face to see,
And watch her milk her father's cow. In it, I saw no harm,
And lots of fun I'd always have before I'd left the barn. CHORUS

Her father has consented and we two will married be.
We'll own our little country home and live in harmony.
No sorrow seems to hover o'er our little cottage home,
For all is blithe and happiness although we live alone. CHORUS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: GUEST,Gadaffi
Date: 17 Oct 05 - 05:58 AM

I'm looking for a South of England song with the words 'All the little chickens in the garden' in its lyric - it appears to be another one in Albert 'Buttercup Joe' Richardson's repertoire. Obviously, the Watersons' version springs to mind.

Are there any other songs with this in the lyric and, if not, what other singers (traditional or otherwise) include this among their repertoire?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 17 Oct 05 - 11:14 AM

I can't think of another at the moment, but it wouln't be surprising if there were a fair few.

A little more on Chickens, since we're here. The song is listed at number 2552 in the Roud Folk Song Index. Currently there are three references to southern English examples; texts without tunes in the Alfred Williams (No.Wt.337) and Mervyn Plunkett (Sussex texts typescript) MS collections, and a sound recording of Harry Green, Tilty, Essex, 1967, made by Fred Hamer (Veteran VT135). There is also a set from Corney McDaid, Buncrana, Donegal (McBride, Flower of Dunaff Hill, 146). The other examples are chiefly USA, with two from Canada.

Further to the earlier reference to Jack London, note the following passage:

'Next morning Billy awoke with his blues dissipated. From the kitchen Saxon heard him painfully wrestling strange vocal acrobatics.

"I got a new song you never heard," he told her when she came in with a cup of coffee. "I only remember the chorus though. It's the old man talkin' to some hobo of a hired man that wants to marry his daughter. Mamie, that Billy Murphy used to run with before he got married, used to sing it. It's a kind of a sobby song. It used to always give Mamie the weeps. Here's the way the chorus goes--an' remember, it's the old man spielin'."

And with great solemnity and excruciating Batting, Billy sang:

"O treat my daughter kind-i-ly; An' say you'll do no harm, An' when I die I'll will to you My little house an' farm-- My horse, my plow, my sheep, my cow, An' all them little chickens in the ga-a-rden.

"It's them little chickens in the garden that gets me," he explained. "That's how I remembered it--from the chickens in the movin' pictures yesterday. An' some day we'll have little chickens in the garden, won't we, old girl?"

"And a daughter, too," Saxon amplified.

"An' I'll be the old geezer sayin' them same words to the hired man," Billy carried the fancy along. "It don't take long to raise a daughter if you ain't in a hurry." '


Jack London, The Valley of the Moon, 1913. book II, chapter XVIII


There's also a passage in James Lewis Everson's autobiography that speaks of the song in the context of stage performance in Chicago, presumably in the early part of the 1880s:

'Saturday night was a gala night at the Park Theatre. It was there that, sooner or later, one was bound to see the much-talked-of John L. Sullivan and other fistic celebrities, but the chief attraction was the star comedian, J. W. Kelly. I regret that my feeble pen is inadequate to express fully the tribute I should like to pay to this master of pathos and comedy. Kelly was, to my mind, the greatest comedian of the past century. I have seen the best of them; David Warfield at the old Bella Union theatre in San Francisco, and later in his dramatic career in "The Auctioneer", "Music Master", and "The Return of Peter Grimm"; Ezra Kendall as a vaudevillian and in "A Pair of Kids", and "The Vinegar Buyer"; and many others, but none so fired my imagination as Kelly.

Can you imagine any of the other comedians of the past or present even trying to popularize such utter trash as the following?

A jolly good old soul.
He lived upon his little farm
Down near the swimming hole.

He had an only daughter
And to win her I did try,
And when I asked him for her hand
Why, this was his reply:

Treat my daughter kindly
And say you'll do no harm,
And when I die I'll will to you
My little house and farm.
My horse, my cow,
My sheep, my plow,
My hogs and little barn
And all the little chickens in the garden."

Kelly did it; and in two or three months' time every kid in town and most of the grown folks were either humming, whistling or singing the silly thing to an even sillier tune. On Saturday nights, pedestrians, when passing saloons, would have their ears bombarded with "Treat my daughter kindly", sung by a roomful of half- drunken men; and sedate men and women meeting each other on the street would greet each other with "Have you heard this? 'Treat my daughter kindly'", etc., and both would laugh vociferously.

Who wrote it? Probably Kelly himself. I doubt if the song was ever heard outside of Chicago. What a laugh Tin Pan Alley would get out of it today.

How did Kelly popularize it? By sheer personality. Each time, before singing it, he would tell his audience in all seriousness that he had just learned a new song that so far surpassed anything he had ever heard in beauty of expression, transcendence of theme, and all the other imaginable virtues, that he was unable to sing it without crying, for which he begged his listeners' indulgence. He would then sing the song, and at the end would be shedding copious tears, as would his audience; but theirs were the tears of prolonged and unrestrained laughter. They loved him and delighted in the deceptions he often practiced upon them.'


James Lewis Everson, The Autobiography of a Tramp, Chapter I. Published online at  http://www.stanford.edu/~quanah/

J W Kelly, "the Rolling-Mill Man," (1857 — 1896) wrote a lot of his own material, but presumably not this one. A couple of his songs, 'Slide, Kelly, slide!' and 'Dan O'Brien's Raffle', can be seen at the  Lester Levy Collection.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: GUEST,Gadaffi
Date: 17 Oct 05 - 11:43 AM

Thanks for that. I like the Mervyn Plunkett connection, esp. since he lived in Sussex. Any idea where this item might be - probably not the Vaughan Williams Library unless you know something I don't.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: GUEST,The Kerryman
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 08:48 PM

Treat Me Daughter Kindly

once there was a farmer and a good old soul was he
he used to live upon a farm down in the country
he had an lovely daughter and her I chanced to win
and when I asked him for her hand these words he did begin

treat me daughter kindly and shade her from all harm
before I die I'll will to you my little house and farm
my horse, my dog, my plow, and my bonnie sheep and barn
and all the little chickens round the garden


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Oct 08 - 09:13 AM

See
Good Old-Time Songs, No. 3. New York: Wehman Bros. 1914.

The words are identical to the ones in the Scottish broadside, but the typography is a bit better.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Deckman
Date: 13 Aug 09 - 12:04 AM

I love this song. I don't know exactly what attracts me ... perhaps it's the simple charm. I use it as a concert opener. I learned from the singing of the late (and wonderful) Merritt Herring. Bob(deckman)Nelson


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Little Chickens In The Garden
From: Barbara
Date: 13 Aug 09 - 12:19 AM

Ah, yes, Bob, I've been reading through this thread and hearing Merritt's voice in my ear the whole time. It's one of the ones he put on his album, if I remember rightly.
Blessings,
Barbara

ps and welcome Cory/Steven.. do try to light on a name, hey? perhaps a bit more manageable than Plalmosiulmow, thank god for the cut and paste function.


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Mudcat time: 1 September 9:54 PM EDT

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