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Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman

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In Mudcat MIDIs:
The Alabama
The Anchor's A-Weigh (doerflinger)
Beware of Larry Gorman
The Boys of the Island
Burns's Log Camp
Byrontown
Call John the Boatman
Charles Gustavus Anderson
Come Down You Bunch of Roses
Corbitt's Barkentine
The Dark Eyed Sailor
The Donzella and the Ceylon
Duffy's Hotel
The Famous Light Brigade
The Female Warrior
The Flat River Girl
The Gale of August,'27
Gimme de Banjo
The Gull Decoy
Hanging Johnny
Harry Dunne
Hello, Somebody
I'm a Decent Boy from Ireland
Jack Haggerty
Jack Tar
The Jealous Lover
John Dameray
Let Go the Reef Tackle
A Long Time Ago (4)
A Long Time Ago (6)
The Maids of Simcoe
McCollam Camp
McKinley Brook
The Millman Song
Paddy, Get Back
The Red Light Saloon
Reuben Ranzo (1)
Reuben Ranzo (2)
Roll the Cotton Down (1)
Roll the Cotton Down (2)
Rufus' Mare
The Schooner Blizzard
The Schooner Kandahar
The Scow on Cowden Shore (version one and two use the same tune.)
The Scow on Cowden Shore (3)
Shallo Brown
The Silk Merchant's Daughter
So Handy
The Spring trip of the Schooner Ambition
Susiana
Tomah Stream
A Trip to the Grand Banks
Were you ever in Dumbarton
The Wife of Kelso
The Wily auld Carle
The Winter of '73
Young Forbest


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Subject: Index: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Dec 00 - 12:39 AM

This is MMario's thread. He started it and did most of the work. I thought it might be a good idea to grace his thread with an index at the top.
Amazon says this book is still in print, and available in paperback for $19.95. I'll betcha it's available at the store at Mystic Seaport, and you could buy Stan Hugill's Shanties from the Seven Seas ($13.97 at Amazon) at the same time. Apparently, Amazon and Mystic they don't have Boxing the Compass, the renamed new edition of Roy Palmer's Oxford Book of Sea Songs.
-Joe Offer-

Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
William Main Doerflinger (1909-2000)


Originally published in 1951 as Shantymen and Shantyboys
Second printing, retitled Songs of the Sailor and Lumbermen, 1972.
Revised with additions, 1990

Alabama, The
Anchor’s Aweigh, The
A-Roving
As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway

Banks of Newfoundland, The
Banks of the Gaspereaux, The
Banks of the Roses, The
Beware of Larry Gorman
Big Five-Gallon Jar, The
Blow, Boys, Blow
Blow the Man Down
Bold Manning
Bold McCarthy (The City of Baltimore)
Bold Princess Royal, The
Boney
Bound Down to Newfoundland
Boys of the Island, The
Burns and His Highland Mary
Burns’s Log Camp
Byrontown

Call John the Boatman
Campañero, The
Canso Strait
Can’t They Dance the Polka!
Charles Gustavus Anderson
City of Baltimore, The
Coast of Peru, The
Come All You Bold Canadians
Come Down, You Bunch of Roses, Come Down
Corbitt’s Barkentine
Cumberland’s Crew, The

Dark-Eyed Sailor, The
Donzella and the Ceylon, The
Dreadnought, The
Drowsy Sleeper, The (Who’s That at My Bedroom Window?)
Drunken Sailor, The
Duffy’s Hotel
Dying Soldier, The

Early in the Morning (The Drunken Sailor)
Ebenezer, The

Famous Light Brigade, The
Female Warrior, The
First of the Emigrants, The
Flat River Girl, The (Jack Haggerty)
Flying Cloud, The
Flying Dutchman, The

Gale of August, ‘27, The
George Whalen (Whalen’s Fate)
Ghostly Crew, The
Gimme de Banjo
Gull Decoy, The

Hanging Johnny
Harry Dunne
Haul Away, Joe
Haul on the Bowline
Heave Away
Hello, Somebody
Highland Laddie
History of Prince Edward Island, The
Homeward Bound
Huckleberry Hunting

I Am a Wild Young Irish Boy
I’m a Decent Boy from Ireland
In Measure Time We’ll Row
Irish Girl’s Lament

Jack Haggerty
Jack Tar
Ja, Ja, Ja!
Jam on Gerry’s Rock, The
Jealous Lover, The
Jean François (Boney)
John Brown’s Body
John Dameray
Johnny Boker
Johnny Walk Along to Hilo
Jolly Young Sailor and the Beautiful Queen, The

Lady Franklin’s Lament
Lady of the Lake, The
Leave Her, Johnny (Time for Us to Leave Her)
Leaving of Liverpool, The
Let Go the Reef Tackle
Light on Cape May, The
Little Golden Ring, The
Long Time Ago, A
Loss of the Cedar Grove, The
Loss of the Druid, The
Loss of the Ramillies, The (The Ship Rambolee)
Lowlands
Lumber Camp Song, The
Lumberman’s Alphabet, The

Maid I Left Behind, The
Maids of Simcoe, The
Mainsail Haul
Mary on the Silvery Tide
McCullam Camp (The Winter of ‘73)
McKinley Brook
Messenger Song, The
Millman Song, The
Mouth of the Tobique, The

Nightingale, The,

Ocean Burial, The,
Off to Sea Once More
Old Oak Tree, The
Our Jack’s Come Home Today

Paddy Doyle
Paddy, Get Back
Paddy West
Paisley Officer, The
Perigoo’s Horse
Peter Emberley
Plain Golden Band, The
Poor Old Man

Red Light Saloon, The
Reuben Ranzo
Rio Grande
Rise Me Up from Down Below
Roll, Julia, Roll
Roll the Cotton Down
Rolling Home
Row, Bullies, Row (Roll, Julia, Roll)
Rufus’s Mare

Sacramento
Sailor Boy, The
Sailor’s Grace, The
Sailor’s Grave, The
Sailor’s Way, The
Sally Brown
Sally Monroe
Santy Anna
Schooner Blizzard, The
Schooner Kandahar, The
Scow on Cowden Shore, The
Shallo Brown
Shantyboys’ Song, The
Shantyman’s Life, A
Shenandoah
Ship Rambolee, The
Silk Merchant’s Daughter, The
So Handy
Soldier and the Sailor, The
South Australia
Southerly Wind
Spring Trip of the Schooner Ambition, The
Stately Southerner, The
Stormalong
Susiana
Swansea Town

They All Love Jack
Time for Us to Leave Her
Tom Dixon
Tomah Stream
Tommy’s Gone to Hilo
Trip to the Grand Banks, A
Two Lovers Discoursing

We’ll Have Another Drink Before the Boat Shoves Off
We’ll Roll the Golden Chariot Along
Were You Ever in Dumbarton?
Wexford Girl, The,
Whalen’s Fate
When Johnson’s Ale Was New
Whiskey, Johnny
Who’s That at My Bedroom Window?
Wife of Kelso, The
Wily Auld Cane, The (The Wife of Kelso)
Winter of ‘73, The

Young Billy Crane
Young Forbest


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Subject: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 22 May 02 - 02:42 PM

PAGE     TITLE 

56 A-ROVING
see DT AROVIN1

35 ALABAMA
see also DT ROLLALAB

166 ANCHOR'S AWEIGH

114 AS I WENT A-WALKING DOWN RATCLIFFE HIGHWAY
see DT RATCLIF2

123 BANKS OF NEWFOUNDLAND
See DT NWFNDLN3

246 BANKS OF THE GASPEREAUX - (no tune given in Doerflinger)
see DT BNKSGASP

315 BANKS OF THE ROSES
See DT BANKROS5

258 BEWARE OF LARRY GORMAN

111 BIG FIVE-GALLON JAR
see also DT STONEJAR

18 BLOW THE MAN DOWN
see DT BLOWDOWN
BLOWDWN2
BLOWDWN3
BLOWDWN4
BLOWDWN5
BLOWDWN6

25 BLOW, BOYS, BLOW
See DT BLOWBOYS
BLOWBOY2

139 BOLD MANNING
see DT BLDMANAN

128 BOLD MCCARTHY
see DT CITYBALT

142 BOLD PRINCESS ROYAL
see DT PRNCRYL
PRNCRYL2
PRNCRYL3

6 BONEY
see DT BONEYNAP
JOHNFRAN

201 BOUND DOWN TO NEWFOUNDLAND
see DT BNDNEWF

218 BOYS OF THE ISLAND

312 BURNS AND HIS HIGHLAND MARY
see DT BURNMARY

217 BURNS'S LOG CAMP

261 BYRONTOWN

173 CALL JOHN THE BOATMAN

84 CAMPANERO
see DT TUNEFILE CAMPNERO or
music

58 CAN'T THEY DANCE THE POLKA!
See DT NYGIRLS2

183 CANSO STRAIT
see DT CNSOSTRT

291 CHARLES GUSTAVUS ANDERSON

128 CITY OF BALTIMORE
see DT CITYBALT

151 COAST OF PERU
see DT CSTPERU
CSTPERU2

273 COME ALL YOU BOLD CANADIANS
see DT GENBROCK

22 COME DOWN, YOU BUNCH OF ROSES, COME DOWN
See also DT BLOODRED

189 CORBITT'S BARKENTINE

**134 CUMBERLAND'S CREW

300 DARK-EYED SAILOR

192 DONZELLA AND THE CEYON

126 DREADNOUGHT
see DT DREDNGHT
DREDNGT2

314 DROWSY SLEEPER
see DT SILVDAG3

48 DRUNKEN SAILOR
see DT DRNKSILR

268 DUFFY'S HOTEL

274 DYING SOLDIER
see also DT DYRANGR

48 EARLY IN THE MORNING
see DT DRNKSILR

200 EBENEZER
see DT EBENZER

276 FAMOUS LIGHT BRIGADE

143 FEMALE WARRIOR

149 FIRST OF THE EMIGRANTS
see DT FRSTEMIG

245 FLAT RIVER GIRL

136 FLYING CLOUD
see DT FLYCLOUD

148 FLYING DUTCHMAN
see DT FLYDUTCH

184 GALE OF AUGUST, '27

243 GEORGE WHALEN

181 GHOSTLY CREW
see DT GHOSCREW
GHOSCRE2

45 GIMME DE BANJO

255 GULL DECOY

31 HANGING JOHNNY

222 HARRY DUNNE
see DT HARRYDUN

4 HAUL AWAY, JOE
see DT HAULJOE

9 HAUL ON THE BOWLINE
see DT HAULBWLN
HAULBWL3

62 HEAVE AWAY
see DT HEAVJHN
HEAVEJH2

46 HELLO, SOMEBODY

50 HIGHLAND LADDIE
See DT DONKEYRD
HIELNLD4

**256 HISTORY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

87 HOMEWARD BOUND
See DT GDBYFWL

32 HUCKLEBERRY HUNTING
See Forum thread

270 ?I AM A WILD YOUNG IRISH BOY

278 I'M A DECENT BOY FROM IRELAND

**172 IN MEASURE TIME WE'LL ROW

318 IRISH GIRL'S LAMENT
See DT ERINVALE

86 JA, JA, JA!

245 JACK HAGGERTY
see DT FLATRVR@
FLATRVR

294 JACK TAR

238 JAM ON GERRY'S ROCK
See DT jamgerr1

287 JEALOUS LOVER

72 JOHN BROWN'S BODY

8 JOHN DAMERAY

9 JOHNNY BOKER
See DT JONBOKER

72 JOHNNY WALK ALONG TO HILO
See forum thread

298 JOLLY YOUNG SAILOR AND THE BEAUTIFUL QUEEN
see DT SAILQUEN

145 LADY FRANKLIN'S LAMENT
See DT LADYFRN2
LADYFRAN
LADYFRN4

302 LADY OF THE LAKE
See DT LADYLAKE

89 LEAVE HER, JOHNNY
See DT LEAVEHER
LEAVHER2
WSTOCEAN

104 LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL
See DT LEAVLIV1
LEAVLIV2

165 LET GO THE REEF TACKLE

130 LIGHT ON CAPE MAY
See DT CAPEMAY

**170 LITTLE GOLDEN RING

37 LONG TIME AGO (1)
LONG TIME AGO (3)
LONG TIME AGO (4)
?LONG TIME AGO (6)

186 LOSS OF THE CEDAR GROVE
See DT CEDARGRV

195 LOSS OF THE DRUID

80 LOWLANDS
See DT LOWLNDS
LOWLND2
LOWLND3
LOWLAND4

210 LUMBER CAMP SONG
See DT LUMBCAMP
LONEFLYR

207 LUMBERMAN'S ALPHABET
See DT LUMBALPH
SAILALPH

**305 MAID I LEFT BEHIND

241 MAIDS OF SIMCOE

**117 MAINSAIL HAUL

282 MARY ON THE SILVERY TIDE
see DT SILVTIDE

220 MCKINLEY BROOK

**266 MESSENGER SONG

285 MILLMAN SONG

**252 MOUTH OF THE TOBIQUE

304 NIGHTINGALE
See DT NGALEWRK

162 OCEAN BURIAL
See Forum thread
See DT BURYNOTC
LONEPRA2

**107 OFF TO SEA ONCE MORE

283 OLD OAK TREE
See DT OLDOAKTR

169 OUR JACK'S COME HOME TODAY
See Forum tune
aussie

10 PADDY DOYLE
See DT PADDOYLE

113 PADDY WEST
See DT PADWEST

54 PADDY, GET BACK

308 PAISLEY OFFICER
See DT PAISLYOF

**266 PERIGOO'S HORSE

227 PETER EMBERLEY
See DT PTRMBRLY

247 PLAIN GOLDEN BAND
See DT PLAINGLD

14 POOR OLD MAN

249 RED LIGHT SALOON

23 ?REUBEN RANZO (1)
?REUBAN RANZO (2)

64 RIO GRANDE
See DT RIOGRAN

47 RISE ME UP FROM DOWN BELOW
See DT WHISKEYO

33 ?ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (1)
ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (2)

106 ROLL, JULIA, ROLL
See DT LIVJUDY

155 ROLLING HOME
See DT ROLLHOM
ROLLHOM2
ROLLHOM3

264 RUFUS'S MARE

68 SACRAMENTO
See DT SACRMNTO
SACRMNT2

164 SAILOR BOY
See DT FTHFULSL
FTHSAILR

160 SAILOR'S GRACE

161 SAILOR'S GRAVE
See DT SAILGRAV

109 SAILOR'S WAY

74 SALLY BROWN
See DT SALBROWN
SALBRWN2

303 SALLY MONROE

78 SANTY ANNA
See DT SNTYANNA
SNTYANN2

198 SCHOONER BLIZZARD

196 SCHOONER KANDAHAR

234 SCOW ON COWDEN SHORE
?SCOW ON COWDEN SHORE (2)
SCOW ON COWDEN SHORE (3)

44 SHALLO BROWN

209 SHANTYBOYS' SONG
See DT LUMBCAMP
LONEFLYR

211 SHANTYMAN'S LIFE
See DT SHNTLIFE

77 SHENANDOAH
See DT SHENDOAH

**144 SHIP RAMBOLEE

296 SILK MERCHANT'S DAUGHTER

12 SO HANDY

277 SOLDIER AND THE SAILOR
See DT ANSWAMEN
See Forum thread

71 SOUTH AUSTRALIA
See DT SOAUSTRL

**174 SOUTHERLY WIND

177 SPRING TRIP OF THE SCHOONER AMBITION

131 STATELY SOUTHERNER
See DT STATESTH

82 STORMALONG
See DT STRMLNG

83 SUSIANA

152 SWANSEA TOWN
See DT HOLYGRND

**166 THEY ALL LOVE JACK

89 TIME FOR US TO LEAVE HER
See DT LEAVEHER
LEAVHER2
WSTOCEAN

251 TOM DIXON

216 TOMAH STREAM

30 ?TOMMY'S GONE TO HILO

179 TRIP TO THE GRAND BANKS

316 TWO LOVERS DISCOURSING

167 WE'LL HAVE ANOTHER DRINK BEFORE THE BOAT SHOVES OFF

49 WE'LL ROLL THE GOLDEN CHARIOT ALONG
See DT ROLLCHAR
ROLLCHR2


307 WERE YOU EVER IN DUMBARTON?

288 WEXFORD GIRL
See DT WXFRDGRL

243 WHALEN'S FATE

168 WHEN JOHNSON'S ALE WAS NEW
See DT JONESALE
See Forum thread

15 WHISKEY, JOHNNY
See DT WHISKJON
WHSKJHN

314 WHO'S THAT AT MY BEDROOM WINDOW?
See DT SILVDAG3

281 WIFE OF KELSO

281 WILY AULD CARLE

214 WINTER OF '73

61 YELLOW MEAL
See DT YELLMEAL

**259 YOUNG BILLY CRANE

224 YOUNG FORBEST


**not yet done/not in DT or forum that I can find.



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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHN DAMERAY
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 11:34 AM

JOHN DAMERAY
(learned at sea (1880's) by Nathaniel Silsbee)
(tune set from his singing by niece, Mrs. George C. Beach)
(Doerflinger:Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - pp 7-8)



Aloft we all must go-oh,
[John come down the backstay]
In hail and frost and snow-oh,
[John come down the backstay,
John Dameray!]

John Dameray - John come down the backstay
John Dameray - John come down the backstay
John Demeray!
John Dameray - John come down the backstay
John Dameray - John come down the backstay
John Demeray!


My Ma she wrote to me,
"My son, come home from seas"

Got no manay and no clo'es
Am knocking out of doors.

My home I soo will be in,
And then we'll have some gin.

From sea I will keep clear,
And live by selling beer.


Doerflinger refers to this as a "fine deep-water tune".


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Subject: Tune Add: JOHN DAMERAY
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 12:19 PM

tune in songwright:

N-John Dameray
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-Eb
B-4/4
F-Doerflinger
H-
M-4R-3 R-8 E-8 E-5 E-8 E-4 E-4 D-2 B-2 E-5 E-8 E-4 E-4
L-A-loft we all must go-oh,John come down the
H-
M-4D-4 F-2 B-4 B-5 D-8 F-4 a-4 G-2 E-2 E-5 E-8 E-4 E-4
L- back-stay, In hail and frost and snow-oh John come down the
H-
M-4G-4 b-2_G-4 E-2 G-5 a-8 b-1 E-2 G-5 a-8
L-back-stay, John Dam-e-ray John Dam-e-
H-
M-4b-3_G-4 F-5 F-8 F-4 F-4 D-4 B-3 D-2 F-4 G-4
L-ray. John come down the back-stay. John Dam-e-
H-
M-4a-3_F-4 E-5 E-8 E-4 E-4 G-4 b-3 E-2 G-5 a-8
L-ray. John come down the back-stay. John Dam-e-
H-
M-2b-2_e-5 r-8 E-2 G-5 a-8
L-ray. John Dam-e-
H-
M-4b-3_G-4 F-5 F-8 F-4 F-4 D-4 B-3 D-2 F-4 G-4
L-ray. John come down the back-stay. John Dam-e-
H-
M-4a-3_F-4 E-5 E-8 E-4 E-4 G-4 b-3 E-2 G-5 a-8
L-ray. John come down the back-stay. John Dam-e-
H-
M-1b-2_e-5 r-8
L-ray.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SO HANDY
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 12:28 PM

SO HANDY
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - p12)
(Halyard shanty)

Handy high and handy low,
[Handy me boys, so handy]
Oh, it's handy haigh and away we'll go,
[Handy, me boys, so handy!]

You've got your advance and to sea you must go
A-round Cape Horn through frost and snow

Growl you may, but go you must.
Just growl too much and your head they'll bust

Now, up aloft from down below,
Up aloft that yard must go.

Now, one more pull and we'll show her clew!
Oh, we're the boys that'll put her thourgh,

With a bully ship and a bully crew,
And a bully Old Man to drive her through!

We're bound away around Cape Horn,
And we'll get there as sure as you're born!

Now one more pull and that will do!
Oh, We're the gang that'll shove her through.

Now, here we are at sea again;
Two months' advance we're up against.

We're the gang that can do it again!
Oh, we're the boys that'll do it once more.


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Subject: Tune Add: SO HANDY
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 12:51 PM

N-So Handy
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-F
B-6/8
F-Doerflinger - Halyard Shanty
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 C-8 F-8_F-8 C-8 F-8_F-8 G-8 a-8_a-8 a-8 a-5 a-8 a-8 a-8 F-4 G-8 a-4 c-8_c-8 c-8 c-8
L-() Hand-y high and hand-y low, Hand-y me boys, so hand-y oh, it's
H-
M-4d-4 c-8 b-4 a-0 a-0 G-4 G-8 E-5 G-8 G-8 G-8 E-4 C-8 G-5 G-4 R-8
L-hand-y high and a-way we'll go, Hand-y, me boys, so hand-y!


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Subject: Lyr Add: POOR OLD MAN
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 01:12 PM

POOR OLD MAN
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - p 14)

As I walked out up-on the road one day,
[for they say so, and they know so,]
I saw 'n old man with a load of hay,
[Oh, poor old man!]

Says I, old man, your horse is lame,
Says I, Old man that horse will die

Now if he dies he'll be my loss
And if he lives he'll be my horse.

And if he dies I'll tan his skin
If he live I'll ride him again

Round Cape Horn through frost and snow,
Round Cape Horn I had to go.

Growl you may, but go you must
If you growl too loud your head they'll bust.


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Subject: Tune Add: POOR OLD MAN
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 01:50 PM

N-Poor Old Man
C-
A-
T-
S-76
K-Ab
B-4/4
F-Doerflinger
H-
M-4R-3 R-0 E-0 E-9 E-0 F-9 F-0 a-4 b-8_c-8 c-4 c-4 b-4 a-9 b-0 c-4 b-2 a-9 b-0
L-As I walked out up-on the road one day; For they say so, and they
H-
M-4c-4 b-2 e-4 E-9 E-0 F-4 a-4 d-9 d-0 c-4 c-8_b-8 a-4 d-4 c-2 b-2
L-know so, I saw 'n old man with a load of hay, Oh poor old
H-
M-1a-3 R-4
L-man!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SAILOR'S GRACE / BLOW THE MAN DOWN
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 02:26 PM

THE SAILOR'S GRACE
(Doerflinger - 'Blow the Man Down - V' - p 21)

Old Horse, Old horse, what brought you here,
[Way, hay, blow the man down,]
After ploughing the turf for many a year;
[Gimme some time to blow the man down!]

With kicks and cuffs and sad abuse,
We're salted down for sailor's use.

Between the mainmast and the pump,
We're salted down in great big hunks.

And when the mate comes from the rudder
He takes a piece of this old blubber.


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Subject: Lyr Add; THE THREE CROWS
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 02:29 PM

THE THREE CROWS
(Doerflinger - 'Blow The Man Down - IV)

There were three crows sat on a tree,
(Way, hay, blow the man down,]
And they was black as black could be,
[Gimme some time to blow the man down!]

Says one old crow unto his mate,
where shall we go for somethin' to ate?

There is an old horse on yonder hill,
and there we can go and eat our fill.

There is an old horse on yonder m ound.
We'll light upon to his jsw-bone

Says one old crow unto the other,
we'll pick his eyes out one by one.


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Subject: Lyr Add: COME DOWN, YOU BUNCH OF ROSES, COME DOWN
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 02:44 PM

COME DOWN, YOU BUNCH OF ROSES, COME DOWN
(preserved by Nathaniel Silsbee)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and the Lumberman - p 22)

Oh, yes, my lads, we'll roll a-lee,
[come down, you bunch of roses, come down]
We'll soon be far a-way from sea,
[come down, you bunch of roses, come down]

Oh, you pinks and poses,
Come down, you bunch of roses, come down
Oh, you pinks and poses,
Come down, you bunch of roses, come down


Oh, what do yer s'pose we had for supper?
Black-eyed beans and bread and butter.

Oh Poll's in the garden picking peas.
she's got fine hair way down to ker knewws.

I went downstairs and peeked throug a crack
And saw her staling a kiss from Jack.

I grabbed right hold of a piece of plank
and ran out quick and gave her a spank.


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Subject: Tune Add: COME DOWN, YOU BUNCH OF ROSES, COME DOWN
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 02:57 PM

N-Come Down, You Bunch of Roses, Come Down
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-Eb
B-4/4
F-Doerflinger, after Silsbee
H-
M-4R-3 C-4 B-4 D-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 F-4 b-2 E-4 E-2 C-4
L-Oh, yes, my lads, we'll roll a-lee, Come down, you
H-
M-4B-4 C-4 D-4 B-4 E-4 E-2 C-4 B-4 D-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 F-4 b-2
L-bunch of ros-es, come down, We'll soon be far a-way from sea,
H-
M-4E-4 E-2 C-4 B-4 C-4 D-4 B-4 E-4 E-2 R-4 b-3 a-4
L-come down, you bunch of ros-es, come down. Oh, you pinks and pos-es
H-
M-4G-4 G-4 a-4 G-4 E-4 E-2 C-4 B-4 C-4 D-4 B-4 E-4 E-2 R-4
L-Come down, you bunch of ros-es, come down. Oh, you
H-
M-4b-3 a-4 G-4 G-4 a-4 G-4 E-4 E-2 C-4 B-4 C-4 D-4 B-4
L-pinks and pos-es, come down, you bunch of ros-es,
H-
M-1E-4 E-2 R-4
L-come down.


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Subject: Lyr Add: REUBEN RANZO (I)
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 03:27 PM

REUBEN RANZO(I)
(From the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - pp 23-24)

Oh, poor old Reuben Ranzo,
[Ranso boys, Ran-zo!]
Oh Ranzo was no sail-or
[Ranzo, boys, Ran-zo!]

But he was a Boston tailor,
He went on a visit to new Bedford.

He was shanghaied on a whaler
He could not do his duty.

So they put him to holystonnign,
they took him to the gangway,

They tied him on the grating,
and they gave him five and forty.

the captain's youngest daughter
begged her father for mercy.

the captain loved his daughter,
and he heeded her cries for mercy.

he put Ranzo in the cabin,
And taught him navigation.

Ranzo married his daughter,
And now he's skipper of a whaler,

and he's got a little Ranzo!
And he's got a little Ranzo!


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Subject: Tune Add: REUBEN RANZO (I)
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 04:12 PM

N-Reuben Ranzo (I)
C-
A-
T-
S-88
K-F
B-4/4
F-Doerflinger - after Richard Maitland
H-
M-4R-3 G-8_a-8 b-4 c-4 b-4 a-4 G-2 a-4 R-4 G-4 G-4 G-2
L-Oh, poor old Reu-ben Ran-zo, Ran-zo boys,
H-
M-4a-4 G-2 G-8_a-8 b-4 c-8_c-8 b-8_b-8 a-8_a-8 F-2 C-4 R-4 F-4 a-8_c-8 c-5_c-8
L-Ran-zo! Oh, Ran-zo was no sail-or, Ran-zo boys,
H-
M-1G-4 F-4 R-2
L-Ran-zo!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Charley Noble
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 04:23 PM

Nice work!

Charley Noble


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Subject: Lyr Add: REUBEN RANZO (2)
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 04:26 PM

REUBEN RANZO (2)
(after the singing of Capt. Patrick Tayleur)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp24-25)

Note: Each solo line repeats (except verse 14). if there is a variation it is shown in parens. Bold text is a shout. Pattern as in first verse.

Oh, pore old rov-ing ran-zo,
HAY
[Ran-zo, boys, a-Ran-zo]
Oh, pore old Rov-ing Ran-zo
[Ran-zo boys, a-Ran-zo!]

Now, Ranzo he was (Aw, Ranzo was) no sailor.

So pore old Roving Ranzo,

Now (So) they shipped him on board of a whaler.

Now the captain he liked Ranzo.

So the captain he taught him how to read and write.

He taught him navigation.

when he got his first mate's papers,

He became a terror to whalers!

He was known all over the world as

As the worst old bastard on the seas!

He would take his ship to Georgiay.

And there he'd (he would) drag for sperm whale.

He lost the only ship he had
His first and last and only ship

Was the 'Morgan', and she's known everywhere.

Now (oh), he's gone to hell and we're all glad!

Now, I've told you he was no sailor.

He was a New York tailor.

Whether (oh, whether) a toailor or a sailor

He sure became a Ranzo!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 04:26 PM

it's just copywork. Doerflinger and those *he* transcribed from have done all the work.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: raredance
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 01:19 AM

"Copywork" or otherwise, it's a nice bunch of adds.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Mr Red
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 09:06 AM

got the 1980's reprint - very useful.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HANGING JOHNNY
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:23 PM

HANGING JOHNNY
(from the Singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p 31)

Now they call me Hang-ing John-ny
[A-way, ay-ay,]
Oh, they say I hang for mon-ey
[Hang, boys, hang!]

They say I hung my dad-dy
[Hoo-way, ay-ay,]
Oh they say I've hung my mam-my,
[hang, boys, hang!]

I hung my sister Sally,
Now they say I 've hung the fam'ly

Oh, we'll hand , and hang together,
And we'll hang for better weather.

Now, get around the Corner Sally
Oh, we'll make you, Saccarappa!


Note: In the music the for this the refrain after the first line is given as "A-way ( or Hoo-way) ay-ay". In the text of the verses the refrain is given as "hooway-ay hay hay" and "hooway-ay hay ay" Which primarily means (I would guess) that it varies a lot.

Two major variations of the music are given - set to verse one and two.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLL THE COTTON DOWN
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:24 PM

ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (1)
(from the singing of John O'Brien)
(doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p 33

Oh, roll the cot-ton, roll me, boys,
[Roll the cot-ton down]
Oh, roll the cot-ton, roll me, boys,
[Oh roll the cot-ton down]

2.When I was young and in my prime.

3. I thought I'd jine the Black Ball Line.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (2)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:25 PM

ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (2)
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp 33-34)
(to the tune of 'A Long time Ago')

Down in Alabama I was born
[Roll the cotton down]
Way done in Alabama I was born
[And I rolled the Cotton Down]

When I was young and in my prime
[Oh, roll the cotton down;]
I thought I'd go and join the Line
[And roll the cotton down]

And as a sailor caught a shine;
[roll the cotton down]
I shipped on board of the Black Ball Line;
[and roll the cotton down]

Now the Black Ball Line is the line for me;
[roll the cotton down]
That's when you want to go on a spree
[And roll the cotton down]

In the Black Ball Line you can cut a big shine;
[oh, roll the cotton down:]
For there you'll wake at any old time,
[And roll the cotton down]

Now see the Black baller prepareing for sea;
[then roll the cotton down]
You'll split your side luaghing, the sights to see,
[and roll the cotton down]

There's tinkers and tailors, shoemakers and all,
[Roll the cotton down]
They're all shanghaied on board the Black Ball
[And roll the cotton down]


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (3)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:26 PM

ROLL THE COTTON DOWN (3)
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p 34)

Way down South where I was born
[Roll the cotton down:]
I worked in the cotton and the corn,
[Oh, roll the cotton down.]

When i was young and in my prime,
I thought I'd go and join the Line,

And for a sailor caught a shine,
I joined on a ship of the Swallowtail Line.

(no tune specified)


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ALABAMA (1)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:28 PM

THE ALABAMA (1)
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp 35-36)

When the Al-a-bam-a's keel was laid
[Roll, Al-a-bam-a, Roll!]
They laid her keel in Birk-en-head,
[Oh, Roll, Al-a-bam-a, Roll!]

Oh, she was built at Birkenhead,
she was built in the yard of Jonathan Laird.

And down the Mersey she rolled away,
And Britain supplied her with men and guns

And she sailed away in search of a prize,
And when she came to the port of Cherbourg,

It was there she met with the little Kearsarge.
It was there she met the Ke-arsarge.

It was off Cherbourg harbor in April, '65,
That the Alabama went to a timely grave.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ALABAMA (2)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:29 PM

THE ALABAMA (2)
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp36-37)

In eighteen hundred and sixty-one,
[Roll Alabama, roll!]
The Alabama's keel was laid,
[And roll, Alabama, roll!]

Twas laid in the yard of Jonathan Laird
At the town of Birkenhead

At first she was called the 'Two Ninety two'
For the merchants of the city of Liverpool

Put up the money to build the ship,
In the hopes of driving the commerce from the sea.

Down the Mersey she sailed one day
To the port of Fayal in the Western Isles.

There she refitted with men and guns,
and sailed across the Western Sea,

With orders to sink, burn and destroy
all ships belonging to the North.

Till one day in the harbor of Cherbourg she laid,
And the little Kearsarge was waiting there.

and the Kearsarge with Winslow was waiting there,
And Winslow challenged them to fight at sea.

Outside the three mile limit they fought (repeat)

Till a shot from the forward pivot that day
Took the Alabama's steering gear away

And at the Kearsarge's mercy she lay
And Semmes escaped on a British yacht.


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Subject: Lyr Add: A LONG TIME AGO (1)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:36 PM

A LONG TIME AGO (1)
(from the singing of William Laurie)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman p 37-38)

A-way dowen South in Old Ten-nes-see,
[Way, hay,hay, yah]
A-way down south in old Ten-nes-see,
[oh, a long time a-go]

It is a long time, a ver-y long time
A long time, a ver-y long time

Since my young lady has written to me, (twice)

Saying, willie dear, come home from sea (twice)

It is a long time, a very long time,
Oh, a long time, a very long time

If ever I get my foot on the shore (twice)

Oh I will go to sea no more!
Oh I will go to the sea no more!

If ever I get my foot on the land, (twice)

I will be some lady's fancy man!
Oh, I will be some lady's fancy man!

It is a long time, a very long time
It's a long time, a very long time.


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Subject: Lyr Add: A LONG TIME AGO (2)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:37 PM

A LONG TIME AGO (2)
(James H. Williams MS)
(Doerflinger - 'Sings of the Sailor and Lumberman' p 38)

Away down Soouth where I was born,
[To me way, hay, hay, yah!]
Among the fields of cane and corn,
[A long time ago.]

I wish to God I had never been born
To go rambling round and round Cape Horn

Around Cape Horn where wild winds blow
Around Cape Horn thorugh frost and snow

The wind from the sou'west a-blowing a gale,
The packet ship she's crowding sail.

The monkey dressed in the sojer's clo'es,
but where he come from God on'y knows!

Oh, bully John from Baltimore,
I knew you well on the Eastern Shore.

Oh, bully John, I knew him well,
But now he'd dead and gone to hell.

Tis a long, long time and a very long time,
Tis a long time since I made this rhyme


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Subject: Add: a Long Time Ago (3)
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 03:37 PM

ALONG TIME AGO (3)
(From the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p39)

When I was young and in my prime,
[to me way-ay-ay yah,]
I thought I'd go and join the line,
[Oh a long time a-go.]

And as a sailor caught a shine
In a lot they called the Black Ball Line

Now come all you young fellers that's going to sea,
And just listen a while unto me.

I'll sing you a song and I won't keep you long.
It's all about the Black Ball Line

Just see the Black Ballers preparing for sea
You'd split your sides laughing the sights you would see

there's tinkers 'n' tailors, shoemakers 'n' all,
For they're all shipped as sailors on board a Black Ball.

Now, one more pull and we'll let her go
We'll h'ist her up through frost and snow

Just one more pull and we'll show her clew,
And another long pull and that will do.

additional verses:

Around Cape Horn you've got to go;
That's the way to Callao

In the Black Ball Line I served my time
I sailed in the Webb of the Black Ball Line.


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Subject: Tune Add: THE ALABAMA
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 04:09 PM

N-The Alabama (1)
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-A
B-4/4
F-
H-
M-4R-3 c-9 b-0 a-4 E-4 C-4 E-9_E-0 a-5 F-8 G-2 b-4 b-9 b-0 b-8 c-5
L-When the Al-a-bam-a's keel was laid, Roll, al-a-bam-a,
H-
M-4b-3 c-9_c-0 a-4 E-4 E-9_E-0 C-4 E-9_E-0 a-9_a-0 b-4 c-4 d-4 c-4 c-9 a-0 b-8 e-4
L-roll! They laid her keel in Birk-en-head, oh Roll, Al-a-bam-a
H-
M-1a-3 R-4
L-roll!


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Subject: Tune Add: HANGING JOHNNY
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 04:24 PM

N-Hanging Johnny
C-
A-
T-
S-58
K-A
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 E-0 F-0 G-4 E-8 F-4 E-8 G-0 b-0_b-8 e-8_e-4_d-8 c-5_c-8_b-8 c-8 b-4 R-8 c-4 c-8
L-Now they call me Hang-ing John-ny. A-way ay-ay, Oh, they
H-
M-5c-4 b-8 b-4 G-8 F-0 E-0_E-4_E-4 R-8 G-5 F-5 E-5_E-4 B-8 G-4 G-8 F-4 E-8
L-say I hang for mon-ey hang, boys, hang! They say I hung my
H-
M-5G-0 b-0_b-8 e-8_e-4_d-8 c-5_c-8_b-8 c-8 b-4 R-8 c-4 c-8 c-4 b-8 b-4 G-8 F-0 E-0_E-4_E-4 R-8
L-dad-dy, Hoo-way, ay, ay, oh they say I've hung my mam-my
H-
M-2G-5 F-5 E-5_E-4 R-8
L-Hang, boys, Hang!


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Subject: Tune Add: REUBEN RANZO
From: MMario
Date: 18 Dec 02 - 04:37 PM

N-Reuben Ranzo (2)
C-
A-
T-
S-69
K-A
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-7R-4 b-8_b-8 G-8_G-8 b-4 a-4 G-8_G-8 F-5_E-8 G-4 R-4 F-4 F-4 F-5 E-8
L-Oh, pore old Rov-ing Ran-zo, Ran-zo boys, a-
H-
M-8G-4 F-4_F-8 R-8 E-8_F-8 F-5 G-8 F-8_E-8 C-4 E-5_D-8 B-2 E-4 G-4 b-5 a-8
L-Ran-zo! Oh, pore old Rov-ing Ran-zo, Ran-zo boys a-
H-
M-2G-8_F-8 E-4_E-4 R-4
L-Ran-zo!


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Subject: Tune Add: ROLL THE COTTON DOWN
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 09:08 AM

N-Roll the Cotton Down (1)
C-
A-
T-
S-80
K-A
B-4/4
F-
H-
M-4R-3 c-8_b-8 a-4 E-4 C-4 E-4 a-4 a-4 a-2 b-5 b-8 b-5 b-8
L-oh, roll the cot-ton, roll me, boys, Roll the cot-ton
H-
M-4b-3 d-4 c-4 E-4 F-4 E-4 a-4 b-4 c-4 d-4 c-5 a-8 b-9_e-9 G-8
L-Down; Oh, roll the cot-ton, roll me boys, Oh, roll the cot-ton
H-
M-1a-3 R-4
L-down.


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Subject: Tune Add: ROLL THE COTTON DOWN
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 09:18 AM

N-Roll the Cotton Down (2)
C-
A-
T-
S-56
K-Ab
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 a-8 a-8_G-8 a-8 b-8_a-9 F-0 G-8 a-8 G-8 F-5 a-5 b-4 a-8 c-5 F-4 c-8
L-Down in Al-a-bam-a I was born, Roll the cot-ton down Way
H-
M-4d-8_e-8 d-8 c-8 b-8 a-8 F-8 G-8 a-8 b-4 c-0 d-0 c-5 b-8 a-9 b-0 a-5 R-5
L-down in al-a-bam-a I was born And I rolled the cot-ton down


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Dead Horse
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 09:48 AM

These sound to me like exremely garbled and mixed up versions of not very well remembered lyrics, therefore are probably exactly what WAS sung aboard ship. The obvious mixture of several shanties, the repeating of single lines, non rhyming couplets, and the transposition of tunes, was a feature which is now sadly lacking in folk orientated "Shanty Singers". It seems to be the done thing to *clean up* these old songs untill they are of Concert Quality.
I commend your efforts, dear sir.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 10:04 AM

just passing it forward...


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Subject: Tune Add: A LONG TIME AGO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 10:42 AM

Two main variations of this tune were given: Set to Verse one and verse two.

N-A Long Time Ago (1)
C-
A-
T-
S-56
K-Ab
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 a-8 a-8_G-8 a-8 b-8_a-9 F-0 G-8 a-8 G-8 F-5 a-5 b-4_a-8 c-5 E-4 c-8
L-A-way down south in old ten-nes-see, Way, hay, hay, yah, a-
H-
M-5d-8_e-8 d-8 c-8_b-8 a-8 F-8 G-8 a-8 b-4 c-0 d-0 c-5 b-8_a-9 b-0 a-5 E-8 F-8 G-8 a-5 b-8_a-9 F-0
L-way down south in old ten-nes-see, oh, a long time a-go 2:It is a long time, a
H-
M-5a-8 a-8 G-8 F-5 a-5 b-4_a-8 c-5 E-4 c-8 d-8_e-8_d-8 c-8_b-8 a-8 F-9 G-0 a-8 b-4 c-0 d-0
L-ver-y long time, way, hay, hay, yah, A long time, a ver-y long time, oh, a
H-
M-2c-5 b-8_a-9 b-0 a-4 R-2
L-long time a-go


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Subject: Tune Add: A LONG TIME AGO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 11:02 AM

N-A Long Time Ago (3)
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-F
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 C-0_C-0 F-8_F-8 a-8 G-8 c-4 F-8_E-8 D-8 E-4 C-0 C-0 F-5 G-4_F-8 a-5 C-4 G-0_a-0
L-When I was young and in my prime, To me way-ay-ay yah I
H-
M-4b-8_c-8 b-8 b-8_a-8 F-8 G-8_G-8 a-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 a-5 G-8_F-8 G-8 F-5 R-5
L-thought I'd go and join the line, oh a long time a-go


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Subject: ADD: A Long Time Ago (4)
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 11:25 AM

A LONG TIME AGO (4)
(From the singing of Patrick Tayleur)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp40-41)

Where there is a variation in the repeat of the line it is shown in parens

Oh, a long, long time and a ver-y long time,
[To me way, ha-ay, hay yah!]
oh, a long, long time, and a ver-y long time
[oh, a long time a-go]

Old Noah, he built a Hark for to sail (to go)

(Oh) Around the world and home again

Now I wend down to the docks one morn for a ship

There was an old wooden packet a-lyyin' there,

So I wnet on board and sked for a job.

Oh, it (she) must have been the old Ark that Noah built.

Her hatch you had never saw nothing before!

About thirty-six feet long and nowhere insured.

Oh, her knees were so thick that you could not discern.

It's a long, long time and a very long time

Now this is the hatch (where)the animals must have gone down.(went down)

The gangway it was built of timber six foot high

I thought that I had struck an 'ome at last,

Where I could make a pay-day and go

Out to the western shores and away

But I had (I had) made a mistake when I judged her that way,

For at last, when we got out and to sea

Her bow it was bluff and her counter was round

Her fores'l would come to within about six points,

Her fo'c'sle was low and her ppoop was so high

That she looked just like a Dutch galley-old-yacht

So it's a long, long time and a very long time
Oh it's a long long time and a very long time


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Subject: Tune Add: A LONG TIME AGO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 11:44 AM

N-A Long Time Ago (4)
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-F
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 C-8 C-8 F-4 a-8 F-8 F-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 F-8 C-4 D-0 E-0 F-5 G-4 F-0_G-0 a-5 C-4 a-0 a-0
L-Oh, a long, long time and a ver-y long time, To me way, ha-ay, hay, yah! Oh, a
H-
M-4b-4 c-8 a-8 a-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 D-8 C-8_E-8 b-0 b-0 a-5 G-8_F-8 G-8 F-5 R-5
L-long , long time, and a ver-y long time, oh, a long time a-go


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Subject: Lyr Add: A LONG TIME AGO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 12:08 PM

A LONG TIME AGO
(From the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp41-43)

variations on the repeat of solo lines shown in parens - though according to the notes the second repeat often began with "Oh," - which is NOT shown...


There was an old lady who lived in Dundee,
[to me way, hay, hay, yah]
There was an old lady who lived in Dundee,
[oh a long time ago]

Now her sons (they) grew up and they all went to sea

One became mate and the other a sailor

But the one that I'm going to tell you of, the story is:

He joined a Hark bound out for the East

And not as a sailor nor yet as a mate

He joined as the master of that fine clipper ship

Now, you all remember the ship that I mentioned.

'Twas the Catty Sark, (and) her name was so high

Now (Oh) he took her out East and he lost his old ship (his whole trip)

He took her out East as these words I have told you

Out to Foochow and then home again

Now, un'appily for him, he married out there

A nice little girl with a long pigtail!

Oh, she wore the trousers and he wore the shirt

But when I can tell you the voyage 'e made 'ome.

Now it's a long, long time and a very long time
Oh a long, long time and a very long time

One hundred and eight days, (oh)he did sail.

And 'e used to look at 'is Chinese wife and say,

If it 'adn't a been for your unluck on board!

Now, a long, long time and a very long time.

Now, I told you he was always a-growlin' at 'is wife,

But when in London he did arrive,

The owners they told him he had made a record voyage!

So what did he do but he's blessed his young wife

And instead of callin' her Mong Sallee

He called her the sweet name of Mong Cutty Sark


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Subject: ADD:A Long Time Ago (6)
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 12:32 PM

A LONG TIME AGO (6)
(from the singing of James P. Barker)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman -p43)

Then up a-loft this yard must go,
[To me, way, ay, ay, yah,]
Then up a-loft this yard must go,
[For it's a long time a-go]

I placed my hand upon her knee

I think, young man, you're rather free!

Then one more pull and that will do

Oh, one more pull and then it's belay!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: EBarnacle1
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 12:35 PM

In A Long Time ago, "Galley old yacht" is almost certainly a mispronunciation of "Galliot" or "Galliot yacht," which was, even then, an archaic rigging style.


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Subject: Tune Add: A LONG TIME AGO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 12:46 PM

N-A Long Time Ago (6)
C-
A-
T-
S-103
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 D-8 G-4 b-8 a-4 F-8 G-8_F-8 E-8 D-4 E-0 F-0 G-5 a-5 b-5 D-4 b-8
L-The up a-loft this yard must go, To me way, ay, ay yah, then
H-
M-4c-4 a-8 d-4 d-8 D-4 D-8 G-4 c-0 c-0 b-5 a-8_G-8 a-8 G-5_G-4 R-8
L-up a-loft this yard must go, For it'sa long time a-go


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 12:47 PM

yes - Doerflinger notes that "galley old yacht" is more properly Galliot


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Subject: ADD: Shallo Brown
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 01:15 PM

see also:
Shallow Brown
Shallow Brown 2
Origins:Shallow Brown
Shalo Brown

SHALLO BROWN
(From the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p44

Shal-lo Brown, now what's the mat-ter?
[Shal-lo, shal-lo Brown!]
Oh, shal-lo Brown, what's the mat-ter?
[Shal-lo, shal-lo Brown!]

I'm going to leave you
[Shal-lo Brown]
Oh, I have left the wife and ba-by
[Shal-lo, Shal-lo Brown!]

The baby's in the cradle,
[shal-lo, shal-lo brown]
...
...

additonal verses

The packet sails tomorrow,
I'm leaving you in sorrow

And the baby in the cradle
My love I won't decieve you

Two major variants of the verse - set to verse one and two


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Subject: Tune Add: Shallo Brown
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 01:45 PM

N-Shallo Brown
C-
A-
T-
S-66
K-G
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 D-8 F-8 G-5 a-8 b-9 a-0 b-8 a-8_a-2 a-8 a-8_a-4 a-0 a-9 E-5 c-8 c-8 b-8
L-Shal-lo Brown, now what's the mat-ter? Shal-lo, Shal-lo Brown! Oh Shal-lo
H-
M-5a-5_F-8 F-9 E-0 E-8 D-8_D-2 G-8 G-8 G-4 G-0 G-9 D-2 F-4 G-9 a-0 b-8 a-8_a-4
L-Brown, what's the mat-ter? Shal-lo, shal-lo Brown! 2)I'm going to leave you,
H-
M-5a-8 a-8_a-2 a-5 c-8 c-8 b-8 a-5 F-8 F-9 E-0 E-8 D-8_D-2 G-8 G-8_G-4 G-0 G-9
L-Shal-lo Brown, Oh I have left the wife and ba-by Shal-lo, Shal-lo
H-
M-1D-2 R-4
L-Brown


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Subject: ADD: GIMME DE BANJO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 03:25 PM

GIMME DE BANJO
(From the singing of William Laurie)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - p 45)

Oh, dis is de day we pick on de ban-jo
[Dance, gal, gom-me de ban-jo!]

oh, dat ban-jo, dat tal-la-tal-la-wan-go

oh dat ban-jo, dat se-ben-string ban-jo

I was only one an' twenty

Ah was sent to shcool fer to be a scholar!

Nah cikkar was stuff, an Ah could not swaller.

Oh, dere's mah book, down on de table

An' you kin read it if you're able

NOTE:Three variants are given for the verse


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Subject: Tune Add: GIMME DE BANJO
From: MMario
Date: 19 Dec 02 - 04:34 PM

N-Gimme de Banjo
C-
A-
T-
S-84
K-Bb
B-2/4
F-
H-1:                                                                      2:
M-8F-2 d-0 d-8 G-0 a-8 F-8 b-0 b-8 G-0 a-8 F-8 D-4 D-4 D-0 D-8 C-0 D-8 B-8 B-5 D-8 F-8 a&4 a-8 a&0 a-0 a-0 a-0 G-8 E-8
L-Oh, dis is de day we pick on de ban-jo, Dance, gal, gim-me de ban-jo! Oh, dat ban-jo dat tal-la-tal-la-wan-go,
H-                              3:
M-7D-4 D-4 D-0 D-8 C-0 D-8 B-8 R-8 d-4 d-8 a-8 F-4 b-8 b-0 b-0 b-8 a-8 F-8 D-4 D-4 D-0 D-8 C-0 D-8 B-8
L-Dance, gal, gim-me de ban-jo! Oh, dat ban-jo dat se-ben-string ban-jo, Dance, gal, gim-me de ban-jo!


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Subject: Lyr Add: HELLO,SOMEBODY
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 09:05 AM

HELLO,SOMEBODY
(From the singing of James P. Barker - in the style of "Lemon" Curtis)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p46)

[Hel-lo, some-bod-y, hel-lo!]*
There's** Some-bod-y knock-ing at the gar-den gate;
[Hel-lo Some-bod-y, hel-lo!]
There's some-bod-y knocking at the gar-den gate;
[Hel-lo Some-bod-y, hel-lo]


Somebody wants to know my name

It's Nigger Dick from New Brunswick


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 09:07 AM

*phew* having problems posting...

Notes:
* - intro phrase for first verse only
** - note for "there's" silent in later verses, also sever 8th note pairs have single words in later verses.


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Subject: Add:Hello, somebody
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 09:44 AM

N-Hello Somebody
C-
A-
T-
S-152
K-G
B-2/2
F-in the style of "Lemon" Curtis
H-Intro:
M-4b-4 b-4 G-4 G-8 G-8 b-4 b-2 b-4 d-4 d-8 d-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 a-4 a-4 F-2
L-Hel-lo, some-bod-y, hel-lo! There's some-bod-y knock-ing at the gar-den gate
H-
M-4a-4 a-4 D-4 D-8 D-8 a-4 a-2 R-8 a-8 a-4 c-8 c-8 a-8 a-8 a-8 a-8 d-4 b-4 G-2
L-Hel-lo some-bod-y, hel-lo! There's some-bod-y knock-ing at the gar-den gate
H-
M-4b-4 b-4 G-4 G-8 G-8 b-4 b-2 R-4 d-4 d-8 d-8 c-4 c-4 a-4 a-4 F-2
L-Hel-lo some-bod-y Hel-lo! Some-bod-y wants to know mah name;
H-
M-4a-4 a-4 D-4 D-8 D-8 a-4 a-2 R-4 a-4 c-8 c-8 a-4 a-4 d-4 b-4 G-2
L-Hel-lo, some-bod-y hel-lo. Some-bod-y wants to know mah name;
H-
M-2b-4 b-4 G-4 G-8 G-8 b-4 b-2 R-4
L-Hel-lo some-bod-y, hel-lo!


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Subject: Add: Rise Me Up from Down Below
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 11:41 AM

RISE ME UP FROM DOWN BELOW
(James P. Barker in the style of "Lemon" Curtis)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p47)

Oh, I come from the world be-low. That is where the cocks do crow.
[Whis-key oh, John-ny oh!
Oh, rise me up from down be-low,
down be-low, oh, oh, oh, oh
Up a-loft this yard must go, John!
rise me up from down be-low!]

I come from the world below!
That is where the fires do roar


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Subject: Tune Add: RISE ME UP FROM DOWN BELOW
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 12:01 PM

N-Rise Me Up From Down Below
C-
A-
T-
S-88
K-Eb
B-4/4
F-in the style of "Lemon" Curtis
H-
M-4R-3 R-8 E-8 E-4 G-8_b-8 b-5 b-8 c-4 b-4 G-2 E-8 G-5 b-5 b-8
L-Oh, I come from the world be-low. That is where the
H-
M-4c-4 b-4 G-2 b-0 b-0 b-5 G-0 G-0 E-4 B-8 E-5 G-8 G-4 b-4 G-4 F-4 E-2
L-cocks do crow. Whis-key oh, John-ny oh! Oh, rise me up from down be-low,
H-
M-4F-5 b-8 b-4 d-4 c-4 F-4 b-2 e-5 c-8 b-4 c-4 b-4 G-4 E-4 E-4
L-down be-low, oh, oh, oh, oh Up a-loft this yard must go, John!
H-
M-2E-5 F-8 G-4 b-4 G-4 F-4 E-2
L-rise me up from down be-low!


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Subject: Lyric ADD:Highland Laddie
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 12:20 PM

HIGHLANS LADDIE
(from the singing of James P. Barker)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -p50)

Ay, Ay, and a-way she goes,
[Bon-nie lad-die, Hie-land lad-die,
Ay, ay, and a-way she goes,
Bon-nie Hie-land lad-die!]

'Way she goes, heels and toes,

This is the day we sail this way,


Note: sung as a chorus throughout - walkaway shanty


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Subject: Lyr Add: PADDY, GET BACK (from Richard Maitland)
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 12:42 PM

PADDY, GET BACK
(From the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp. 54-55)

I was broke and out of a job in the city of London.
I went down the Shadwell Docks to get a ship.

Paddy get back. Take in the slack!
Heave away your capstan, heave a pawl, heave a pawl!
'Bout ship and stations, there, be handy,
Rise tacks 'n' sheets, 'n' mains'l haul!

There was a Yankee ship a-laying in the basin.
Shipping master told me she was going to New York.

If I ever get my hands on that shipping master,
I will murder him if it's the last thing that I do!

When the pilot left the ship, the captain told us
We were bound around Cape Horn to Callao!

And he said that she was hot and still a-heating,
And the best thing we could do was watch our step.

Now the mate and second mate belonged to Boston,
And the captain b'longed in Bangor down in Maine.

The three of them were rough-'n'-tumble fighters.
When not fighting amongst themselves, they fought with us.

Oh, they called us out one night to reef the tops'ls.
There was belayin' pins a-flyin' around the deck.

We came on deck and went to set the tops'ls.
Not a man among the bunch could sing a song.

Oh, the mate he grabbed ahold of me by the collar.
"If you don't sing a song, I'll break your blasted neck!"

I got up and gave them a verse of "Reuben Ranzo."
Oh, the answer that I got would make you sick!

It was three long months before we got to Callao,
And the ship she was called a floating hell.

We filled up there at Callao with saltpetre,
And then back again around Cape Horn!

(Alternate last verse)
We filled up with saltpetre to the hatches
And then bound around Cape Horn to Liverpool.


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Subject: Tune Add: PADDY, GET BACK
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 01:09 PM

N-Paddy, Get Back
C-
A-
T-
S-156
K-G
B- F-
H-
M-2R-1 R-8 D-4 D-8 G-4 G-8 G-8 G-8 a-8 b-8 b-8 a-8 G-8 G-8 E-8
L-I was broke and out of a job in the cit-y of
H-
M-2D-5 B-3 b-4 c-8 d-4 d-8 c-4 b-8 c-4 a-8 a-4 F-8
L-Lon-don; I went down the Shad-well Docks to get a
H-
M-2G-3_G-5 G-8 G-8 F-8 E-1 F-8 G-4 E-8
L-ship. Pad-dy get back, take in the
H-
M-2D-3_D-5 R-5 G-4 G-8 G-4 G-8 G-4 a-8 b-4 G-8
L-slack! Heave a-way your cap-stan heave a
H-
M-2a-5 d-4 d-8 d-3 G-5 G-4 a-8 b-4 a-8 G-4 E-8
L-pawl, Heave a pawl! 'Bout ship and sta-tions, there, be
H-
M-2D-5 B-3_B-5 d-5 b-4 b-8 c-4 a-8 a-4 F-8
L-hand-y, Rise tacks 'n sheets, 'n main-s'ls
H-
M-1G-3_G-5 R-5
L-haul!

The fourth measure has a major variation for the second stanza - not given here.


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Subject: ADD: John Brown's Body
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 02:00 PM

JOHN BROWN'S BODY (HIP HIP HIP HURRAH)
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp72-73)

John Brown's body lies a-mould'ring in the grave
John Brown's body lies a-mould'ring in the grave
John Brown's body lies a-mould'ring in the grave
[Then it's hip, hip, hip, hur-rah!
Glo-ry Glo-ry Hal-le-lu-jah
Glo-ry Glo-ry Hal-le-lu-jah
Glo-ry Glo-ry Hal-le-lu-jah
Then it's hip, hip, hip, hur-rah!]

There's my girl with the blue dress on,

John Brown's wife drinks whiskey in her tea!


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Subject: ADD:Stormalong
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 02:36 PM

DT tunefile - STRMALNG

STORMALONG
(from the singing of Richard Maitland)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman pp82-83)

Old Storm-a-long was a gay old man,
[To me, way, old Storm-a-long!
Old Storm-a-long was a grand old man
[Aye, aye,aye,Cap-tain Storm-a-long]

But now he's dead, poor old Stor-my's gone
We bur-ied old Storm-y off Cape Horn

Poor old Stormy we'll ne'er see again.
We buried Poor Stormy off Cape Horn

We rolled him up in a silvery shroud
We lowered him down with a golden chain.

Although he's gone, he's left us a son.
How I wis I was old Stormy's son!

I'd build a ship of a thousand ton
I'd load her down with New England Rum

I'd sail this wide world round and round
And every day my crew would get their rum!

I'd pour out two drinks for the shantyman (twice)

I'd pour out drinks for every man
And a double cup for the shantyman!


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Subject: ADD:Susiana
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 02:53 PM

SUSIANA
(from the singing of Eliezer Zinck - Nova Scotia)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p83)

We'll heave him up from down be-low
[hoo-ray, oh, Su-si-a-na!]
We'll heave him up and a-way we'll go,
[A-way right o-ver the moun-tain!]


Note: pump or hauling shanty


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Subject: Tune Add: SUSIANA
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 03:05 PM

N-Susiana
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 D-8 G-4 G-8 D-4 D-8 G-4 G-8 D-4 D-8 G-4 D-8 D-4 C-8 B-8 D-4 R-4 D-8
L-We'll heave him up from down be-low, Hoo-ray, oh, Su-si-a-na! We'll
H-
M-4G-4 G-8 F-9 E-0 D-8 E-4 E-8 D-4 B-8 D-4 D-8 D-8 B-8 A-8 A-8 @-4 R-5
L-heave him up and a-way we'll go, A-way right o-ver the moun-tain!


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Subject: Add: The Campanero
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 03:39 PM

THE CAMPANERO
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp84-85)

Intro:

Oh, when-ev-er I went a-way, The stor-y I'd like to tell,
A-bout an 'an-dy lit-tle bark, the Camp-an-er-o.

Chorus:
Oh, it's be-tween the cook and the pump,
Well they drive me off me chump
On the 'and-y lit-tle bark, the Camp-an-er-o!
If I ev-er go to sea,Well, it won't be up to me
To go in that hand-y lit-tle bark, the Camp-an-er-o!

Verse:

Oh, the skip-per he is a bull-doz-er,
And you nev-er did hear
The words that come from a man's mouth so often
The mate he wants to fight, and then dur-in' eve-ry night,
the boys a-round the hatch they all sur-round him.

well, I'd have you all to know that wherever you do go,
If you see the name a-running fore-and-aft her,
Don't jine her anywhere, or you'll never forget the day
That you jined that 'andy little bark, the Campenaro!

You may ring around the world, and go just where you please,
She's a livin' at a single time for days and months.
But if you';; take a sailor's advice, you'll get married once or twice
Before you jine that 'andy little bark, the Campenaro!

Chorus:


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Subject: Add:Ja, Ja, Ja
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 03:59 PM

JA, JA, JA
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer - pump shanty)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p86)

O mitsch mein ink-um stink-um buck-er-room and mein ja, ja, ja
Mitsch mein ink-um stink-um buck-er-room and mein ja, ja, ja
Vell, ve'll git up on der shteep-les
and ve'll spit down on der peo-ples,
Mitsch mein ja, ja, ja!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SAILOR'S WAY
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 04:20 PM

see also Across The Line (dt file sailfate)

THE SAILOR'S WAY
(from the singing of Frank VIckery - tune=Off to Sea Once More)
(Doerflinger -'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - p109)

I've sailed among the Yankees, The Spainards and Chinees.
I've laind down with the yellow girls beneath the tall palm trees.
I've crossed the Line and Gulf Stream, and around by Table Bay,
And around Cape Horn and home again, oh, that's the sailor's way!

Oh, bobby'll go to his darling, and Johnny'll go to his dear,
And Mike will go to his wife and fam'ly, and Andrew for pipes and beer;
But I'll got to the dance hall to hear the music play,
For around Cape Horn and home again, oh, that is the sailor's way!


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Subject: ADD:The Big Five-Gallon Jar
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 04:33 PM

THE BIG FIVE-GALLON JAR
(from Henry E. Burke)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p111)

In Liv-er-pool there liv'd a man Jack Jennings was his name
And in the days of square-rigged sail he played the shang-hai game
His wife's name was Car-o-line, sail-ors knew from near and far;
And when she played the shang-hai game she used his big sone jar.

In the old Vir-gin-ia low-lands,low-lands,low,
In the old Vir-gin-ia low-lands low!@


There were drunkards in the corner and bummers at the bar
And Caroline was supplying them with a big five-gallon jar
...
...

Said old Jack to old Caroline, I'll tell you what we'll do,
There's a ship lying down to McKinnon's Wharf; I think she wants a crew.
We'll go down around the corners to get some drunken tars
We'll shanghai them away out of Liverpool Bay with a big five gallon jar.

So JAck and Cal they worked their game when the ships signed on their tars,
Skys'l Jack and Pete and Bowline Bill helped to judge old Cal's five gallon jar.
Now we'll bid adieu to Cal and Jack and set our sails for ports afar
Dear Shanghai Cal, we'll all come back, and sample Jack's five-gallon jar.

Burke's title for this was "Cal and Jack - the Shanghai-ers"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 20 Dec 02 - 04:40 PM

for Five-Gallon JAr - see also the Big Stone Jar in DT - tune is not quite the same - but close.


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Subject: ADD:The FLying Cloud (2)
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 11:47 AM

THE FLYING CLOUD (2)
(from the singing of Archie lant - Ontario ~1890)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp138-139)

My name is Ed-ward Hal-la-han, as you may un-der-stand.
I was born in the coun-ty of Wa-ter-ford in E-rin's hap-py land.
It was in my ear-ly days of youth, when beau-ty on my shone,
My par-ents dot-ed on me, I be-ing their on-ly child.

My father bound me to a trade in Waterford's own town;
He bound me to a cooper there by the name of William Brown.
I served my master faithfully for eighteen months or more,
When I shipped on baord the Ocean Queeen bound for Beleeza shore.

It waqs a short time after, that I met with Captain Moore;Commander of the Flyind Cloud, belonging to Baltimore.
He askemd me to go along with him, on a slavish voyage to go
To the burning shore of Africa where the sugarcane does grow.


Note:though Doeflinger prints only three verses - the tune has five phrase variants without direction as to where they are used or in what combinations.


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Subject: Add: The Female Warrior
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 11:59 AM

THE FEMALE WARRIOR
(from the singing of Capt. Henry E. Burke)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p 143,144)

This dam-sel was brought up to read and to write,
But this dam-sel was nev-er brought up for to fight,
But be-ing gal-lant-ly dressed in her roy-al es-tate,
She shipp'd on board of the Un-ion as mate.

Where she served a twelve-month, a twelve-month or more,
Till at last we grew close to the old England Shore
There we saw a French pirate lying down by the main,
And it caused us to hoist up our taps'ls again.

We hoisted our tops'ls and bore down alongside,
But the first salutation we got was a broadside,
We gave them another just as hot as they sent
Now for to link each other was our full intent

This first salutation our captain was slain
And this damsel was chosen, master to remain
...
...

Then she fought this French pirate for hourse sever,
Till she scarecly had a man on her deck that could steder,
Till she scareely had a man that could handle a gun
While the blood from her scuppers like water did run

For quarters, for quarters, this French Turk did cry;
But 'No quarters, No quarters!" this damsel replied.
You've had all the quarters that I can afford
You must fight, sink or swim, or die by the sword!


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Subject: Tune Add: THE FEMALE WARRIOR
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 12:29 PM

N-The Female Warrior
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-8R-5 F-8 G-8_C-8 E-8 F-8 G-8 c-4 b-8 a-4 D-9 E-0 D-5 D-0 E-0 F-4 F-8 G-8 b-8 a-4 G-8 E-4 C-9 E-0
L-This dam-sel was brought up to read and to write. But this dam-sel was nev-er brought up for to
H-
M-8C-4 R-8 T38bE-0 F-0 F-0 G-0 C-9_C-8 E-8 G-8 c-4 d-8 c-4 R-8 D-0 E-0 D-4 R-8 E-8 F-8 G-5 b-8 a-4 G-8 G-8_E-8 C-0 D-9
L-fight, * But be-ing gal-lant-ly dressed 9in her roy-al es-tate, she shipp'd on board of the Un-ion as
H-
M-1C-4 R-4
L-mate.


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Subject: ADD:Let Go the Reef Tackle
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 01:26 PM

LET GO THE REEF TACKLE
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p165)

As we sailed down the Chyan-nel of old eng-e-land,
With our pen-nants all fly-ing at bay,
And a man on the yard-arm a-clear-ing
the reef tayck-le and this wis what he'd say:

Let go the reef a-tayck-le.
Let go the reef a-tayck-le,
Let go the reef a-tayck-le,
My sheets they are jammed


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Subject: Tune Add: LET GO THE REEF TACKLE
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 01:45 PM

N-Let Go the Reef Tackle
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-8R-4 E-8 D-8 C-4 E-8 G-8 b-8 c-4 d-8 e-4 e-8 d-8 c-4 b-8 a-8 G-0 c-9 a-8_F-8 F-8_a-8 F-8 E-8 E-2_E-4 E-8 D-8
L-As we sailed down the Chyan-el of old Eng-e-land, With our pen-nants all fly-ing at bay, and a
H-
B-3/4
H-
M-5C-2 D-8 C-8 C-4 E-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-5 a-8 G-4 G-4 c-4 E-4
L-man on the yard-arm a-clear-ing the reef tayck-le and
H-
M-1D-8 D-5 C-8 C-8 C-2_C-4_C-4 R-4 G-4
L-this is what he'd say, Let
B-4/4
H-
M-4c-2_c-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 a-4 F-4 R-4 a-4 d-2_d-8 c-8 d-8 c-8 b-4 G-4 R-4 G-4
L-go the reef a-tayck-le, let go the reef a-tayck-le, let
H-
M-4c-2_c-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 a-4 F-4 R-4 F-4 G-2_G-4 c-8 b-8 c-2_c-4 R-4
L-go the reef a-tayck-le, My sheets, they are jammed!


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Subject: ADD: The Spring Trip of the Schooner Ambition
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 02:11 PM

THE SPRING TRIP OF THE SCHOONER AMBITION
(from the singing of Captain Roger Conrad)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp177-179)

It was in the schoon-er Am-bi-tion,
That I'm going to sing a-bout
Al-bert him-mel-mann was our cap-tain,
Nine-teen was our full crowd

He te-e-phoned to the crew to come
To go a-way this day
It was on March the twen-ty-ninth
We're the first to fill a-way

We are in the port oc Canso
The place we all know well,
and taking a baiting of frozen squid
The Atlantic Fish company did seel

We went out on the Western Bank
And started to let her play;
We baited up and let her run
And hauled our trawls that day

Next morning it was blowing hard;
Our vessel she went adrift,
The wind being from the south southeast
And all iced up on deck.

We shifted to the Western Bank
and finished our frozen squid
Then we went to Canso and got some more,
But we didn't finish all of it.

Then on our way to Magdalenes
We got among the ice;
We couldn't get over there for bait
So squared por P. E. I.

After laying there a week or more,
We then proceeeded on;
We went to Cape North, a fisheing there,
but the fish not being on;

After jogging round a day or more,
The fish then came around;
Some of the vessels had gone up north
Some went to Middle Ground

We finished fishing that baiting
And we started out for more;
We finished another small baiting,
Which makes a total of four.

On the last part of homeward passage,
Thje wind southeast by south;
After clearing up a little
We got in Middle south

The word was passed then all around
To come around in time;
And now the spring trip is ended
and everybody's feeling fine!


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Subject: Tune Add: THE SPRING TRIP OF THE SCHOONER AMBITION
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 02:55 PM

N-The Spring Trip of the Schooner Ambition
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-1R-2 D-8 D-8 G-4 b-8 d-0 d-9 e-8 d-8 b-4 G-4 G-8 D-4 G-8 G-4 F-8 G-2 D-8 D-8
L-It was in the schoon-er Am-bi-tion, that I'm going to sing a-bout. Al-bert
H-
M-1G-0 G-9 b-8 d-4 e-8 d-4 b-8_b-4 a-8 c-4 b-8 a-4 G-8 a-2 R-8 D-8 G-0 G-9 b-8 d-4 e-8
L-Hil-mel-mann was our Cap-tain, Nine-teen was our full crowd. He tel-e-phoned to the
H-
M-5d-8 b-4 G-4 G-8 D-4 G-8 G-4 F-8 G-2 R-8 D-8 G-4 b-8 d-4 e-8 d-4 b-8 b-4 a-0 a-0
L-crew to come To go a-way this day. It was on March the Twen-ty-ninth, We're the
H-
M-1c-4 b-8 a-4 G-8 a-2 R-4
L-first to fill a-way


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Subject: Add:A Trip to the Grand Banks
From: MMario
Date: 23 Dec 02 - 03:29 PM

A TRIP TO THE GRAND BANKS
(Amos Hanson)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - p179-180)

Ear-ly in the spring when the snow is all gone,
The pe-nob-scot boys are anx-ious their mon-ey for to earn;THey will fit out a fish-er-man, one hun-dred tons or nigh,
For the Grand Banks of New-found-land their luck for to try.

Sailing down the river, the weather being fine,
Our homes and our frineds we leave far behind;
We pass by Sable Island, as we've oft done before,
Where the waves dash tremendous on a storm-beaten shore,

Now the vessel is our quarters, the ocean is our home,
And islands, capes and headlands we leave far astern
We run to the eastward for three or four days,
Then round and "sound" upon the western edge

The we run for the shoals and we run for the rocks,
Where the hagduls and Careys, they surround us in flocks;
We let go our best anchor, where the seas run so high,
On the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, the snapeyes for to try.

Early in the morn at the dawn of the day,
We jump into our dories, and saw, saw, away;
The snapeyes steal our bait, and we rip and we rave,
If ever we get home again, we'll give up the trade.

In this way we pass the summer, through dread and through fear
In fog mulss and gales of wind and big ships passing near;
The sometimes run the shcoonders down and sink them in the deep
The thoughts of such scenery is horrid to repeat.

Now the salt is all wet, but one half a pen,
The colors we will show and the mansail we bend
Wash her down and scrub the decks, the dories we will sotw,
Then heave up the anchor! To the Westward we go!


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Subject: Tune Add: A TRIP TO THE GRAND BANKS
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 10:23 AM

N-A Trip to the Grand Banks
C-Amos Hanson
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-8G-8 E-8 C-8 E-8 G-4 c-8 a-8 G-4 G-8 E-8 G-4 G-8 G-8 G-8 E-8 C-8 E-8 G-8 E-8 G-8_E-8 D-8 D-8 D-8 E-8 D-4 @-8 @-8
L-Ear-ly in the spring when the snow is all gone, The Pe-nob-scot boys are anx-ious their money for to earn; they will
H-
M-8C-4 C-8 D-8 E-8 E-8 E-8 F-8 G-8 G-8 a-8 E-8 G-4 G-8 G-8 a-4 c-8 a-8 a-8 F-8 E-8 C-8 D-4 C-8 C-8 C-5 R-8
L-fit out a fish-er-man, one hun-dred tons or nigh, For the Grand Banks of New-found-land their luck for to try.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE GALE OF AUGUST, '27
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 10:37 AM

THE GALE OF AUGUST, '27
(George Swinamer; tune=The Death of Floyd Collins)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp184-185)

Good peo-ple, come and lis-ten, a sad sto-ry I will tell,
Of Eight-y-sev-en fish-er-men, good men we all know well,
Who left their homes in Apr-il to sail the rag-ing seas,
To reap the o-cean's har-vest that feed-eth you and me.

Their hearts were light within them to hoist those fleecy sails,
And soon they left the harbor to catch the pleasant gales,
But down on Sable Island, where those angry waves do rage
Those eighty-seven fishermen all met their watery graves.

For many miles before them they saw those angry waves,
And soon their vessels foundered beneath their sandy graves.
The have left us here in sorrow to live and earn our bread
And by God's helo, good people, I know we'll all be fed.

Their bodies now lie sleeping beneath that quick and rolling sand;
Their spirists are in heaven with that bright and happy band.
No more they'll hoist those topsails or fight the raging seas,
But on that bright eternal day they'll dwell where all is free.

On the ninth day of October, im memory of our dead,
Five thousand gathered in Lunenburg, by the band we all were led.
The harbor it was scattered with flowers sweet and fair,
And all denominations united there in prayer.

To Him who rules us from on high with His almighty hand,
Grant to us on this Judgement Day united we may stand
Where sould and body meet again, where pain and sorrow cease.
O, May we meet together there and dwell inendless peace!


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Subject: Tune Add: THE GALE OF AUGUST, '27
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 10:52 AM

N-The Gale of August, '27
C-George Swinamer
A-
T-
S-100
K-E
B-4/4
F-tune = The Death of Floyd Collins
H-
M-4R-3 G-4 b-4 b-4 c-4 b-4 b-4 G-4 F-4 F-4 E-4 F-4 E-4 C-4
L-Good peo-ple come and lis-ten, a sad sto-ry I will
H-
M-4E-2 R-4 G-4 b-5 b-8 c-4 b-4 b-4 G-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 E-4 F-4 G-4
L-tell, Of eight-y-sev-en fish-er-men, good men we all know
H-
M-4F-2 R-4 G-4 b-4 b-4 c-4 b-4 b-4 G-5 R-8 F-4 E-4 F-4 E-4 C-4
L-well, Who left their homes in Ap-ril to sail the rag-ing
H-
M-4E-2 R-4 B-4 E-8 E-5 E-4 F-4 G-8 b-5_b-4 c-4 b-4 G-4 F-4 E-4
L-seas, To reap the o-cean's har-vest that feed-eth you and
H-
M-1E-2 R-2
L-me.


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Subject: Add:Corbitt's Barkentine
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 11:30 AM

CORBITT'S BARKENTINE
(from the singing of Charles Boudreau)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp189-191)

Come all you brave An-nap-o-lis boys, I'll tell you what I've seen,
On a voyage to De-me-ra-ra in a fan-cy bark-en-tine.
The thir-ti-eth day of Au-gust in eight-een eight-y three
The Ev-a John-son took our lines and towed us out to sea.

The mates did pick their watches and unto us did say,
If you can't do your duty, boys, she's the hottest out of the bay!
Oh Lord, Oh Lord, what have I done, bo bitterly [one?] did scream,
That I should be shanghaied on board of Corbitt's barkentine?

The rising sun next morning shone on six seamen bold,
And one big dog named Rover made seven hands all told,
He was chum of the second mate, for when his watch was done,
Instead of going forward he would lie aft in the sun.

I think they were connected, if rightly I may guess,
For neither one spoke English, but they both said "ja" for "yes"
The wind is to the west'ard, she heads across the Stream.
the angry waves are rolling over Corbitt's barkentine.

Our Captain on the quarter, while thirteen days passed by,
A speck to the head and windward one morning did espy,
Now, mind your hel-m carefuly, don't let her swing about,
And if the wind holds steadily we soon shall make her out.

It proved to be the Myrtle, with three long days a start,
And with a fair and lively breeze that drove her like a dart,
But now we exchange signals, she's to leeward on our beam,
She dips her colors gracefully to Corbitt's barkentine.

Oh, now we're shoving lumber, and the sweat like rain does pour,
Wishing for the night to come so we can get on shore,
And then we're up to Tibert's Bay upon some drunken spree,
Or else we're off a-dancing, upon our dignity!

But if our friends could see us, you bet that we'd by shy,
For we have sweethearts fore and aft, although they're on the sly,
And down there comes a yaller gal dressed up just like a queen,
Inquiring for the steward of Corbitt's barkentine.

Now we're loaded sugar and for boston we are bound
We'll take our sand and canvas and we'll wash and scrub her down,
And after that is finished to painting we will go.
We are in hopes when that is done to get one watch below.

Old Neptune he had favored us with a fair and lively breeze.
andlike a thing endowed with life she bounds across the seas.
Old Scotty caught a dolphin [that] turned yellow, blue and green.
The blood lies spattered on the deck of Corbitt's barkentine.

Now under a goose wing[ed] tops'l and a double-reefed mainsail,
With her head toward the nor'west she rides a furious gale.
If honest Tom was only here to hear those wild winds blow,
He'd wish to God that he was out of Corbitt's gondelow!

Our course being west nor'west, my boys, if I remember right,
With everything all sheeted home she heads for Boston Light
The sun upon the state house dome so brightly does gleam
it glitters forth a welcome to corbitt's barkentine

Now we sight Nova Scotia's shores, with outstretched hands exclaimes,
Like William Tell, Ye crags and peaks, I'm with you once again.
The up along that Granville shore majestically we sail.
We pass Goat Island on our lee all through the rain and hail.

And now we lie at anchor abreast this gay old town.
we'll run aloft Saint George's Cross, the wreath and Tory crown,
the people are all remarking;it is their only theme;
there lies the 'George E. Corbitt'! She's a handsome barkentine!


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Subject: Tune Add: CORBITT'S BARKENTINE
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 11:45 AM

N-CORBITT'S BARKENTINE
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-E
B-2/2
F-
H-
M-4R-3 G-4 G-5 G-8 G-5 G-8 b-8 E-0 E-0 E-2 E-4 F-4 E-4 C-4 E-4
L-Come all you brave An-nap-o-lis boys, I'll tell you what I've
H-
M-4B-3 B-8 B-8 B-4 E-4 E-4 E-4 E-4 E-4 E-5 F-8 G-4 G-4 F-4 E-4
L-seen, On a voyage to De-me-ra-ra in a fan-cy bark-en-
H-
M-4F-3 G-4 G-8 G-8 G-4 G-4 G-4 b-4 E-2 E-4 F-4 E-4 C-4 E-4
L-tine. The thir-ti-eth day of Au-gust in eight-een eight-y
H-
M-4B-3 a-4 a-5 c-8 a-4 F-4 G-4 b-4 G-4 E-4 C-4 C-4 D-4 B-4
L-three. the Ev-a John-son took our lines and towed us out to
H-
M-1E-3 R4
L-sea.


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Subject: Add: The Donzella and the Ceylon
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 12:45 PM

THE DONZELLA AND THE CEYLON
(Danial Smith)
(Fronm the singing of Captain Henry Burke)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp192-194)

'Twas on the first of Feb-ru-a-ry from Lun-en-burg we set sail.
Kind heav-en did re-ward us with a fair and pleas-ant gale.
We left the town of Lun-en-burg so ear-ly in the morn,
And side by side we sailed a-way, the Don-zel-la and Cey-lon.

And looking out to leeward, a schooner we did spy,
It is the Lizzie Wharton! our captain he did cry.
Our Captain is a Western mand, to Cape Negro he belings,
And that's our mate from Lockeport, boys, by the name of Thomas Brown.

Our cook we shipped at Lunenburg, from Port Medway he came;
There are three others of our crew, you well do know each name.
Our hull and rigging are both good, our officers did say.
We'll run aloft our stays'ls, the donzella we will try!

The second night from home, lads, the wind did loudly blow,
At four o'clock in the morning away our jib did go.
Our captain he then came on deck and siad to us, his men,
Take in that piece of jib, my lads! The storms'l we will bend!

Fourteen days from home, my lads, in Ponce, Porto Ric', we lay,
Our captain he then came on board and unto us did day,
We are the first in here, my boys! Now for a hearty cheer!
But in ten hours afterwards, the Donzella did appear.

We fdinished our outward cargo on the sixteenth day,
Our Captain he then came on board and unto us did say,
Our cargo is molasses, boys, for Boston, so I hear
We'll take it on board quick again and for the north we'll steer.

We left the port of Ponce, my boys, with a fair and pleasant gale,
Our little mate did loudly shout, Hoist up those lofty sails!
The Ceylon is as fast a boat as ever crossed the main,
Our Captain is a plucky man by the name of Charlie Swain.

After leaving Ponce we headed north, the breeze being fairly storng,
With all sail set under sunny skies the Ceylon stormed along,
The wind then increased very sharp, we quickly shortened sail,
I then heard Captain Swain remark, Prepare for a heavy gale.

The wind now blew a hurricane, we set our reefed stormsail.
The next ten hours we lay hove to in a vicious Gulf Stream gale.
We head-reached under double reefs six dreary days or more
The wind decreased, with rising glass, we knew the gale was o'er.

Next morning, boys, as we arose, the sun shone bright and clear,
We shook out our close reefs, for South Channel we did steer,
Our good ship speeded onward to the port that we were bound
But to our sad misfortune the wind did haul around.

That night it was a terrible one as you will understand;
The lightning flashed, the thunder rolled, another gale on hand,
At four o'clock in the morning, our ship we did heave to;
For twenty four long hours the wind did loudly blow.

Our food and water now being short we were distressed at sea,
Our run being up for Shelbourne, but land we could not see.
God know what will become of us, our officers did say.
We surely will be lost on shore or we'll be starved at sea.

[it was?]On the twenty-eight of March, as you will understand,
With main boom broke and foremast sprung, by chance we made the land.
The land looked very strange to us, for it we did not know,
It proved Cape Breton Islands, a place called Point Michaud.

We drifeted now toward the point, where breakers loud did roar;
We let go the both anchors, for we could do no more.
the cables snapped, the Ceylon struck, a crashing, shivering shock.
We safely got in our lifeboat and reached St. Peter's Lock.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 01:20 PM

N-The Donzella and the Ceylon
C-Daniel Smith
A-
T-
S-132
K-Eb
B-6/8
F-from the singing of Henry Burke
H-
M-4R-2 R-8 G-8 b-4 b-8 a-4 b-8 c-8 c-4 D&0 D-8 R-0 F-8 a-8 G-8 F-8 E-4 F-8 E-4 R-4 E-8
L-'Twas on the first of Feb-ru-a-ry from Lun-en-burg we set sail. Kind
B-2/4
H-
M-1G-0 E-9 G-9 b-0
L-heav-en did re
B-6/8
H-
M-1e-8 b-4 R-8 b-8 c-8
L-"ward us with a
B-2/4
H-
M-1e-0 e-9 d&8 c-8
L-fair and pleas-ant
B-3/4
H-
M-5b-5 R-4 E-8 G-4 E-8 G-8 b-4 e-8 e-8 b-8_b-4 c-8 d&8 e-4 d-4 c-8 b-5 R-4 G--_a-=
L-gale. we left the town of Lun-en-burg so ear-ly in the morn, and
B-2/4
H-
M-1-8 c-8 a-8 c-8
L-"side by side we
B-3/4
H-
M-1E-9 D-0 B-4 R-8 E-8
L-sailed a-way, the
B-6/8
H-
M-3D-9 C-0 B-8 E-4 E-8 E-4 R-2
L-Don-zel-la and Cey-lon.


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Subject: ADD:The Loss of the Druid
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 03:09 PM

THE LOSS OF THE DRUID
(crew of the Druid)
(from the singing of Henry Burke)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p195)

I'll sing you a song of a schoon-er of fame,
In Lun-en-burg owned and the Du-id her name;
Jim-my Jack-son* her own-er, a mis-er was he,
Too greed-y to fit out his ves-sel for sea.

So Lun-en-burg boys, keep stead-y,
And still your rights main-tain,
For Jack-son swears he'll nev-er send
The Druid to sea a-gain!


With a fair, pleasant breeze we crossed the Gulf Stream,
Not knowing the danger was lurking at sea;
When off of Bermuda the barometer fell,
and warned us all to prepare for a gale.

Our captain came for'ard, his orders to give;
Nail up your fore quarters and aft we will live
In God is our trust, for the gale is at hand.
Get ready, my boys, by the mainmast to stand!

The wind from the northeast blew a terrific blast,
which caused us poor sailors to cut away the mainmast.
The then tried our pumps and we found that she leaked;
The water she made was dreadful to speak.

*named changed at the request of the singer.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 04:17 PM

Whalen's Fate


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Just Amy
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 06:21 PM

MMario - you are awesome, I adore you!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 27 Dec 02 - 06:29 PM

all it takes is a computer and the book. *grin*


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 08:46 AM

I'm being lazy and NOT converting the tune for 'The Loss of the Druid' to Songwright format. I *do* have it available in NWC format and midi; and will post the midi when our tech problems with that are resolved.


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Subject: ADD:The Schooner Kandahar
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 09:04 AM

THE SCHOONER KANDAHAR
(Sepley Collin)
(From the singing of Frank Risser)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp196-198)

'Twas in the schoon-er Kan-da-har, With Cap-tain Wil-liam Shube,
We were a crew of sev-en all told, A hap-py joy-ful crew.
And when we go to do our work We do it joy-ful-ly,
And when we al-so go on shore, We have a joll-ly good spree.

It's also when we go on shore, we dress so very neat.
We try to charm those pretty girls, Which we meet upon the stree.
They boldly step up to us And they ask us who we are;
We answer them politely, "From the schooner Kandahar!"

It's then we went to Louisburg A load of coal to take,
Bound down to St. John's, Newfoundland, a quick passage we did make.
Our captain he chartered her there For the island of Barbados.
He says, "We'll get our vessel ready for the favorable winds that blows!"

After thirteen days on passage Our vessel she sprang a leak,
But it not being serious On our same old course did keep.
With the favorable trade-winds a-blowing,We arrived in four days more,
But owing to smallpox raging there We were not allowed on shore.

They wanted to quarentine us; This made our captain mad.
He says, "Give me my orders and I'll go to Trinidad!"
After telegraphing all around, which caused us much delay,
The customs officer came on board and ordered us under way.

So gladly we got under way And went to Trinidad.
After lying there a week or more, Our vessel was leaking bad.
We had to go to St. Thomas's To put her on the slip.
I tell you, there we enjoyed ourselves The best of all that trip!

It's then we went to Sant'mingo, And that's a very good port.
We loaded a load of sugar Bound up to old New York.
With the favorable breezes a-blowing, We were getting right around;
We bid adieu to the Yankee girls, For Lunenburg we were bound.

We arrived safely in Lunenburg, The place we love the best;
We opened a jug of St. Thomas's rum And I guess you'll know the rest!
Now much success to the Kandahar With Captain William Shube,
Likewise mate, cook and sailors! We were a jolly crew.


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Subject: tune add:
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 10:34 AM

N-The Schooner Kandahar
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 C-8 C-4 E-8 G-9_a-0 G-8 c-9_b-0 c-8 F-4 G-8 F-8_E-8 D-8 G-4 G-8 C-4_C-5 c-8
L-'Twas in the schoon-er Kan-da-har, With Cap-tain Wil-liam Shube,
H-
M-5d-4 d-8 G-9_a-0 b-8 c-9 b-0 c-8 d-8_c-8 a-8 G-4 G-8 b-4 a-8 G-4_G-5 c-8 d-4 d-8 G-8_a-8 b-8
L-We were a crew of sev-en all told, A hap-py, joy-ful crew. And when we go to
H-
M-5c-9_b-0 c-8 d-8_c-8 a-8 G-4 G-8 b-4 a-8 G-4_G-5 G-8 C-4 E-8 G-9_a-0 G-8 c-9_b-0 c-8 G-4 G-8
L-do our work we do it joy-ful-ly, And when we al-so go on shore, We
H-
M-2F-8_E-8 D-8 G-8 G-8 G-8 C-5 R-5
L-have a jol-ly good spree!


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Subject: ADD:The Schooner Blizzard
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 10:57 AM

THE SCHOONER BLIZZARD
(from the singing of Henry Burke)
(tune = irish derived variant of 'Lord Randal')
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp198-200


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 11:24 AM

THE SCHOONER BLIZZARD
(from the singing of Henry Burke)
(tune = irish derived variant of 'Lord Randal')
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp198-200)

Come all you jol-ly sail-or-men that fol-low the salt sea,
I pray a warn-ing you'll take; now lis-ten un-to me,
And do not be in haste, my boys, to leave your na-tive shore,
To sail in those mean pac-kets where they put no food on board.

The twenty-eight September, lads, I'll ne'er forget that day,
The wind blew from the southwest as we got her under way.
We headed out the bay, my boys, thinking that all was right,
But little did we think we had no oil to burn that night.

Five days after leaving port in Sydney we did lay,
Our mate then said unto us, "Boys, we'll scrape her down today."
The we did commence to scrape and slush her down also,
Ans when the stewards did sing out, "Hash," our heads hung pretty low.

For when we got below, my boys, it did look pretty bad;
Our meat was stale, our bread half-baked, and butter none we had.
I guess we looked quite glum as we sat trembling like a leaf,
and every eye was fixed upon this chunk of rotten beef.

We laid there until Friday, then to South Sydney we did go.
We then discharded our ballast and got ready for to load.
We then did load a cargo of coal for Yarmouth bright and fair,
And five days after leaving port we anchored safely there.

We worked at painting all next day until the call for tea;
Then we dressed up and went on shore the pretty girls to see.
We strolled about the busy street uuntil the clock struck ten,
And we jogged on board of our "poor-house"; we felt quite sleepy then.

Next morning bright and early as we in our bunks did lay,
We heard our mate shout from on deck, "Boys, get her under way!"
We then jumped up and went o n deck to hear the next command;
'Twas "Get the hawser ready, boys, the tow boat is at hand."

We bid the Yarmouth girls adieu and towed outside the bay,
And after putting ropes shipshape, our mate to us did say:
"We are now bound down the coast, lads, to the port that's called Cow Bay"
To load another cargo for where I cannot say"

Five days after leaving port, In Cow Bay we did lay,
And there we had a gale of wind which made us work all day.
We carried fenders all day long; our sholders felt quite sore
Until we all agreed that we would carry them no more.

We then discharged our ballast and got ready for to load,
But where our craft was loading for 'twas no one of us knowed
Until we had her under way and slipped out with the tide,
Our Captain told our chief mate, "We are bound to Summerside."

Now sway and shout, my jolly tars, the wind is blowing mild.
We soon will set our topsails and steer for Summerside.
It's then we will parade on shore up to some butcher stall
For butter and meat that's fit to eat and likewise kerosene oil.

Our steward's name was Edmund Brown, as you will understand,
He went on shore in Summerside and worked a dirty plan;
He fell in with a maiden there whose name I do not know,
He told our Captain his wife was sick and home he had to go.

Our Captain thought the words the steward had told to him were true,
He left him go home, as he thought the lad was going to do;
But to our great surprise we heard from all around the town,
The steward and his fair maid had left to be married in Charlottetown.

Well, now my song is ended so I'll just relate to you
the names of these four hungry men who were the Blizzard's crew:
there's harry, Carles and Robert Burns, belonging to this town*
and likewise Harry from LaHave, who helped to write this song.

Well now, my lads from far and near, a word I'll give to you;
If you will lend a list'ning ear I'll tell you what to do
Never ship in Wolf's "poor-house," she'll shtarve you right to death.
So now you'll please excuse me, for I'm nearly out of breath.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 12:25 PM

N-The Schooner Blizzard
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-2R-2 R-8 G-8 a-5 a-8 G-8 a-8
L-Come all you jol-ly
B-2/4
H-
M-8c-8 c-8 C-9 E-0 G-0 E-9 D-8 E-8 D-4 R-8 D-8 F-8 D-0 R-0 F-0_G-9 a-8 d-8 a-8 d-8 d-0 d-0 c-4 b-8 a-4 R-8 E-8 F#0 D-9 F%0 a-9
L-sail-or-men that fal-low the salt sea, I pray a warn-ing you'll take; now lis-ten un-to me and do not be in
B-3/4
H-
M-1d-8 d-8 a-5 b-8
L-haste, my boys, to
B-2/4
H-
M-3d-0 d-9 c-8 b-8 a-4 R-8 G-8 a-0 b-9 G-8 a-8
L-leave your na-tive shore, To sail in those mean
B-3/4
H-
M-1D-8 C-8 A-4 R-8 B-8
L-pac-kets where they
B-2/4
H-
M-2C-0 A-9 D-0 D-0_E-8 D-4 R-4
L-put no food on board.


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Subject: ADD: The Winter of '73
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 12:41 PM

THE WINTER OF '73 / McCullam Camp
(Larry Gorman)
(from the singing of Clev Ryan)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp214-215

On the eight-eenth of Sp-tem-ber in eight-een sev-en-ty three,
I left my native Is-land and came to Mir-mi-chi,
I hired the day I land-ed to work in Snow-ball's mill,
That lare two-stor-ied build-ing at the foot of Sawdust Hill.

ON the eighteenth of Novemeber, the mill she did shut down,
which caused a general scattering, the men went walking round.
I hear of those that wanted men, that put me in good cheer.
I packed my Kennebecker and for Indiantown did steer.

When I arrived at Indiantown, being mach fatigued from tramp,
I fell in with two portash teams bound for McCullam Camp.
John Ingraham, Bill Derringham were both of these men's names,
Belonging to McCullam Camp and drove two portash teams.

I drove with Billy Derringham, a verse for him I'lll make,
He drove a gray and a roan that he brought from the Grand Lake,
The horse he weighed twelve hundred, and a noble beast to haul,
the mare she was a beauty too, although she was but small.

When we arrived at McCullam Camp, being hungry, tired and cold,
The face of Billy Bryenton was the first I did behold.
The crew they were as fine a bunch as ever I did see,
That was my first experience [up] on the Mirimichi.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 01:49 PM

N-The Winter of '73
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-6/8
F-
H-       First Verse
M-5R-5 E-9_F-0 G-8 C-4 C-8 D-4 F-8 a-8_G-4 G-4 D-8 F-4 E-8 C-8 C-9 B-0 C-5 R-4 G-8
L-On the eith-eenth of Sep-tem-ber in eight-een sev-en-ty three I
H-
M-5c-4 c-8 a-8_b-8 c-8 b-5 D-4 E-8 F-4 G-8 b-4 a-8 G-5 R-4 G-8 c-4 b-8 a-8_b-8 c-8
L-left my na-tive Is-land and came to Mir'-mi-chi. I hired the day I
H-
M-5b-5 D-4 E-8 F-4 G-8 b-4 a-8 G-5 R-4 G-8 C-4 C-8 D-4 E-8 a-5 G-4 C-0 C-0
L-land-ed to work in Snow-ball's mill, That large two stor-ied build-ing at the
H-                                                 All other verses:
M-5F-8 F-4 C-4 B-8 C-5 R-4 G-0 G-0 c-4 c-8 a-8_b-8 c-8 b-5 D-4 E-8 F-4 G-8 b-4 a-8
L-foot of Saw-dust hill. On the eight-eenth of Nov-em-ber, the mill she did shut
H-
M-5G-5 R-4 G-8 c-4 b-8 a-8_b-8 c-8 b-5 D-4 E-8 F-4 G-8 b-4 a-8 G-5 R-4 G-8
L-down. Which caused a gene-ral scat-tering, the men went walk-ing round.
H-
M-5c-4 b-8 a-8_b-8 c-8 b-5 D-4 E-8 F-4 G-8 b-4 a-8 G-5 R-4 G-8 C-4 C-8 D-4 E-8
L-I heard of those that wanted men, that put me in good cheer, I packed
H-
M-3a-5 G-4 C-0 C-0 F-8 F-4 C-4 B-8 C-5 R-5
L-my Ken-neb-eck-er and for Ind-ian-town did steer.


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Subject: ADD: Tomah Stream
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 02:14 PM

TOMAH STREAM
(from the singing of Robert MacArthur - attributed by the singer to Larry Gorman)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp216-217)

Come all you Mill-town row-dies that drink and have no fear,
I'll have you not to touch a drop in the fall of the year;
For if you do, you'll sure-lye rue, like-wise my-self I've seen,
Be care-ful, do not hire out to work on To-mah Stream.

For the last fall that ever was, I was drunk and on a spree.
I swore that I would hire, and the very fisrt sight I'd see.
The first it was old Natty Lamb, and up to him I steered.
I hired to work on Tomah and to drive six little steers.

He said the chance for lumbering was the best I ever did see,
The spruce they stand upon a ridge, as thick as thick can be.
The provisions I'll provide for you, and of the very best kind!
The cook will dish 'er up for you and have yer males on time.

But when I got to Squirrel Point, 'twas there I was struck dumb
To see the load of provision that into the camp must come.
there was three little loaves of bread as black as the Ace of Spades
And about a quarter of a pound of teas and an old bull's shoulder blade.

We packed our provisions up and put them on a sled,
We hitched behind an old gray mare that had a broken leg.
We all marched up the turnpike behind this fancy team.
That is the fate of any man who works on Tomah Stream.

At length we got to Tomah; 'twas there we made a stop
We hitched the old mare to a tree and cast about the lot.
The way we had to travel, it was a muddy tramp.
Each man he had to sack a load that night in to the camp.

At length the camp it hove in view; it was a sight to see.
There laid an old dead porcupine, full as large as me.
A piece of an old hemp carpet, 'twas wore as thin as gauze,
This was the beddin' that Natty had for to keep out the frost

We rested hard that night, my boys, we shivered with the cold.
We rose by day in the morning a sight for to behold.
We kindled up a fire and the frost was cutting keen.
I cursed the day I hired out to work on Tomah Stream.

About ten o'clock in the morning Old Natty he appeared.
We all rushed to the door and grieved him with a cheer.
He said, you look quite happy, all in your little abode,
A pox upon the devil, boys! Why didn't you skid the road?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 02:39 PM

N-Tomah Stream
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-E
B-4/4
F-
H-
M-4R-3 G-4 G-5 G-8 a-4 a-4 b-4 b-2 E-4 F-5 E-8 E-4 D-4
L-Come all you Mill-town row-dies that drink and have no
H-
M-4E-2 R-4 G-4 a-5 b-8 c-4 a-4 G-8 a-8 b-4_b-4 G-4 a-4 G-4 F-5 E-8
L-fear, I'll have you not to touch a drop in the fall of the
H-
M-4b-2 R-4 G-4 a-8 b-8 c-4_c-4 a-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 R-8 E-8 a-5 b-8 c-4 d%4
L-year; For if you do, You'll sure-lye rue, like-wise my-self I've
H-
M-1b-2 R-4 B-4 E-8 F-5 G-4 E-4 C-2 B-4 B-4 B-8 E-5 E-5 D-8
L-seen, Be care-ful, do not hire out to work on To-mah
H-
M-1E-2 R-2
L-Stream.


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Subject: ADD: Burns's Log Camp
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 02:47 PM

BURNS'S LOG CAMP
(from the singing of "Duke" Neilson)
(Doerflinger -'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -p217)

I 'rived in the camp, and all I could see
Was a lous-y old cook and a lous-y cook-ee;
The floors were all dirt-y, all cov-ered with mud;
The bed-quilts were lous-y and so was the grub.

The cook called for supper; they all tore from work.
Some had two knives and other two forks.
While fighting for molasses they upset the lamp,
And thus I was greeted at Burns's log camp.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 03:13 PM

N-Burns's Log Camp
C-
A-
T-
S-207
K-D
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 D-8 D-4 F-4 a-4 a-4_G-5 E-8 E-4 D-4 D-4 D-2 a-8 a-8
L-I 'rived in the camp, and all I could see Was a
H-
M-5a-4 b-4 c-4 d-2 e-8 d-8 c-4 a-4 a-4 a-4 R-5 a-8 a-4 b-4 c-4
L-lous-y old cook and a lous-y cook-ee; The floors were all
H-
M-5d-8 a-5 F-4 G-8 a-5 b-4 a-4 R-5 F-8 D-4 F-4 a-4 a-4 G-5 E-8
L-dirt-y, all cov-ered with mud; The bed-quilts were lous-y and
H-
M-2E-4 D-5 D-8 D-4
L-so was the grub.


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Subject: ADD:McKinley Brook
From: MMario
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 03:49 PM

McKINLEY BROOK
(George Calhoun)
(From the singing of David A. Smith)

The rain does down in torrents pour
and fast it spash-es on the floor
for our old camp leaks rath-er free
for com-fort, as you plain-ly see.

Perhaps the Lord he does intend
a little deluge for to send
To drown this whole McKinley crew,
For they deserve it well, it's true.

Their nights are oft in gambling passed
And some will win tobacco fast,
And then like Satan they will cheat;
and swear at cards, they can't be beat.

Now, one a vulgar song will sing
and make the lonely forest ring.
To dance and gamble, sing ans swear,
Few crews can with those men compare.

Out in the dark they dare not stay,
for fear Old Nick takes them away.
They mimic everyone they hear;
The best at this is Alec Grier.

But half of them are going away,
Ande if they git in Kenney's way,
I hope he'll make them sore repent
the way they have this winter spent.

But if he makes a change in them
and turns them all to pious men,
Then I will say there's hope for all
And Satan's kingdom soon shall fall!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: radriano
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 04:27 PM

Thanks, MMario!


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Subject: Tune ADD: McKinley Brook
From: MMario
Date: 31 Dec 02 - 01:18 PM

N-McKinley Brook
C-George Calhoun
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 F-9_G-0 a-8 c-8 a-4 G-9_F-0 D-8 D-8 D-4 F-9_D-0 C-8 C-8 c-4 b%8_G-8 a-8 c-8 d-8 R-4 a-8
L-The rain does down in tor-rents pour and fast it spash-es on the floor for
H-
M-1d-8 d-8 d-4 d-4
L-"our old camp leaks
B-5/8
H-
M-3c-8 a-8 F-4 G-8 a-8 c-8 a-8 G-8_F-8 D-8 D-8 D-5
L-rath-er free for com-fort, as you plain-ly see.


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Subject: ADD: Jack Tar
From: MMario
Date: 31 Dec 02 - 01:39 PM

JACK TAR
(from the singing of Guy Morehouse)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp 294-295)

Come all my fair ones,
Come all my dear ones,
Come and lis-ten un-to me.
Could you fan-cy a jol-ly sail-or lad
That has just come from sea?
Could you fan-cy a jol-ly sail-or lad
That has just come from sea?*

No, I dislike them
No I despise them
For they smell so much of tar!
So begone, you sassy sailor lad,
so begone, you Jack Tar.

I have ship on the ocean, love,
I have money in my pocket, love,
I have gold in great store
I would give to a poor country girl
If she would wed Jack Tar.

Soon as she heard him say
Down on her bending knees fell she,
Saying, Forgive me my jolly sailor lad,
for I love none but thee.

Do you think I'm foolish, love
Do you think I'm crazy, love?
Do you think I'm going mad,
For to wed with a poor country girl
That's no fortune to be had?

verses 1&2 have a different opening to the tune then verses 3,4,5.



*last couplet repeats in each verse


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 31 Dec 02 - 02:00 PM

Not sure how verse 4 fits this. I think some lyrics are missing.

N-Jack Tar
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-C
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-3C-4 C-8 D-8 E-4 @-4 C-4 C-8 D-8
L-Come all my fair ones, come, all my
B-3/4
H-
M-5E-4 C-4 C-8 E-8 G-4 G-4 a-8 F-8 E-2 D-8 E-8 F-4 F-8 E-8 E-8 D-8 G-8 E-8 C-8_D-8 E-8 F-8
L-dear one, Come and lis-ten un-to me. Could you fan-cy a jol-ly sail-or lad That has
H-
M-5E-4 D-4 B-4 C-2 D-8 E-8 F-4 F-8 F-8 E-8 D-8 G-8 E-8 C-8_D-8 E-8 F-8 E-8_E-8 D-4 B-4
L-just come from sea? Could you fan-cy a jol-ly sail-or lad That has just come from
H-
M-5C-2 R-4
L-sea?


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Subject: ADD:The Boys of the Island
From: MMario
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 10:54 AM

THE BOYS OF THE ISLAND
(from the singing of Jared MacLean)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp 218-219)

Come all ye young fel-lows of Prince Ed-ward Is-land,
come list to my song and I'll tell you the truth:
It's true I'm a na-tive of Prince Ed-ward Is-land,
I'll ad-vise ev-'ry young ans sen-si-ble youth.

Now, the boys on the Island, they say they're not happy
to work on the farm; they say it's no good.
They talk foolish nonsense, they're rambunctious crazy,
To go off to Bangor and work in the woods.

Now, a new suit of clothes is prepared for the journey,
a long pair of boots made by Sherwood and Clark,
And a fine Kennebecker filled up with good homespun
and then the young Islander takes his embark.

When he reaches Bangor, gits off at the station,
Old woodsmen gaze on him all with a keen eye,
for they know by the clothes that the youngster is wearing,
It is easily seen that he came from P.I.

Now a lumberjack;s life is of short duriation,
Made up of tobacco, hard work and bad rum,
But according to Scripture there are a hereafter,
And the worst of your days, boys, has yet got to come.

The boys of the Island is oft times in trouble,
God, man and the Devil to them's all the same.
Such up-river tearing, blashpeming and swearing,
Drinking and fighting 'tis their down-river game.

Brade Kelley will poison a man with bad whiskey,
For pastime they will banish their lager and ale;
Then on the corner when he does get frisky,
They will call for Tim Carey to take him to jail.

Now, if this be the law, by the mother of Moses,
They have better laws 'mong the heathen Chinees.
They go out and git drunk and come in and git sober,
Thwy go out when they like and come in when they please.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 11:51 AM

N-The Boys of the Island
C-from the singing of Jared MacLean
A-
T-
S-120
K-Eb
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 G-8 E-8 G-8 F-8 E-0 G-9 b-8 c-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 G-8 b-8 e-8 d&8 c-8 b-8 a-8 G-8 F-8 R-8 G-8
L-Come all ye young fel-lows of Prince Ed-ward Is-land, come list to my song and I'll tell you the truth; It's
H-
M-4E-9 E-0 E-8 E-8 G-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 G-8 b-0 b-0 e-8 d-8 c-8 b-8 R-8 G-8 F-8 C-9 D-0 E-8 R-4
L-true I'm a na-tive of Prince Ed-ward Is-land, I'll ad-vise ev-'ry young and sen-si-ble youth.


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Subject: Add: Harry Dunne
From: MMario
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 12:07 PM

HARRY DUNNE
(from the singing of Archie Lant)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p222)

there's man-y a young Ca-na-di-an boy leaves home and friends so dear,
And long-ing for ex-pee-ri-ment, to Mich-i-gan to steer.
In less than three months af-ter, a tele-e-gram does come,
Say-ing, Your son was killed in the lum-ber-ing woods, His bod-y we'll send home,

I once did know a charming youth by the name of Harry Dunne
His father was a farmer in the county of Odun.
He had everything he wanted, and a farm of good land,
But he only wanted to have a time in the woods of Michigan.

see Dt songfile:HarryDun


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 03:24 PM

N-Harry Dunne
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-G
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5D-3 E-4 D-4 E-4 c-3_c-4 a-4 b-4 a-4 b-4 G-4_
L-There's man-y a young Ca-na-di-an boy
H-
M-5G-2 E-4 D-2 E-4 G-2 G-4 G-5 R-8 R-4 R-2 b-4
L-leaves home and friends so dear And
H-
M-5c-2 d-4 e-2 e-4 d-8 b-2_b-8 G-2 d-4 b-2 a-4
L-long-ing for ex-pee-ri-ment, to Mich-i
H-
M-5a-8_G-5 E-4 D-2 R-4 R-2 b-4 c-2 d-4 e-5 e-5
L-gan to steer. In less then three months
H-
M-5d-2_b-4 G-5 R-8 d-4 b-2 a-4 a-8_G-5 E-4 D-5 R-5
L-af-ter, a tel-e-gram does come
H-
M-5R-2 T34aD-8 D-8 D-8 E-2 E-4 c-2 a-8 a-8 b-4 a-4 b-4 G-4 R-2
L-say say-ing your son was killed in the lum-ber-ing woods
H-
M-1E-4 D-2 E-4 G-2 G-4 G-2
L-his bod-y we'll send home.


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Subject: ADD:Young Forbest
From: MMario
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 04:01 PM

YOUNG FORBEST
(from the singing of Pat Lumson)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Silor and Lumberman')

Come all you young men from the Nash-wask,
It's of a young man I'm going' to talk,
Young El-mer For-best wasa this man's name,
Of Christ-ian par-ents this young man came.

He worked five years for John MacBean*
He worked five years for John MacBean.
he worked five years in his employ,
And they called him their own serving boy.

The marched them up John Sullivan's hill,
the marched them to the forest gree
It was there to behold it was there to be seen,
With axes keen the cut them down**
And on the wagon their lumber bound.

The choppers stopped, they heard a groan,
The wagon partee, but never broke,
the wagon parted but never broke;
Young Forbest fel, and he never spoke.

His comrades washed his hands and face all o'er;
And for this young man they could do no more.
His parents bore him down, and on his grave you can sit and*** weep
While he lies under, fast asleep

These lines were written by a blind man,
and every verse it is complete
And every line it is the truth,
Here ends the days of a faithful youth

*pronounced McBane
** repeat notes for line three for line four
*** the quarter note that would normally follow the eight note for "grave" becomes 4 16ths regular melody resumes on dotted quarter for "weeps"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 04:24 PM

N-Young Forbest
C-
A-
T-
S-100
K-F
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5C-5 F-4 G-8 a-4_a-8 F-4 a-8 b-8 b-4 G-5 R-4 C-8 F-4 G-8 a-4_a-8 F-4 a-8
L-Come all you young men from the Nash-waak.It's of a young man I'm
H-
M-5b-8 c-0_b-0 a-8_a-5 R-4 C-8 F-8_F-8 G-8 a-4_a-8 F-4 a-8 b-8 b-4 G-5 R-4 C-8 F-4 G-8
L-goin' to talk, YOung El-mer For-best was this man's name; Of Christ-ian
H-
M-2a-5 F-4 G-8 F-8 E-4 F-5
L-par-ents this young man came.


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Subject: ADD:
From: MMario
Date: 06 Jan 03 - 09:36 AM


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Subject: ADD:The Scow on Cowden Shore
From: MMario
Date: 06 Jan 03 - 09:39 AM

THE SCOW ON COWDEN SHORE (1)
(from the singing of Willie Norrad)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp234)

My name is Lar-ry Gor-man, to you I mean no har-rm.
You need-n't be a-lar-rmed, you've heard of me before
I can make a song and sing it, and into me-tre bring it,
and the ti-tle that I give it is 'The Scow on Cow-den Shore'


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Subject: Add: The Scow of Cowden Shore (2)
From: MMario
Date: 06 Jan 03 - 09:59 AM

THE SCOW ON COWDEN SHORE (2)
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp234-235)

Oh, my name is Larry Gorman, to you I mean no har-rm;
And don't you be offended, for of me you'e hear before.
I can make a song and sing it, and in good metre bring it,
and the title that I'll give it is 'The Scow at Cowden Shore'

We've go men of every nation, with dark and swarthy faces
to gain and occupation I'll wtry and name them o'er/
Island men and Restigouchers, Nashwaakers and Pugmooshers,
All assembled here together round the scow at Cowden Shore.

We got men from oromocto, and more from Riichibucto,
From Frederiction and Bathurst and Macdonals from Baras d'Or.
Night ramps and gallivanters, swift runner and fast canters,
All assemplbe her together round the scow at Cowden Shore.

Oh, there the two young Joyces, with their unhuman voices,
Making all kinds o' noises ontil their throat is sor
A bear-wolf or Indian Devil, he would be far more civil
Than this oncultivated rubbish round the scow at Cowden Shore.

Now, Dan Brown and Billy buggy on night got very gorggy,
the night was dark and foffy, they put up a heduous roar.
Being somewhat agaitated and very much excited,
All hands they did upright it round the scow at Cowden Shore.

Now, there;s the widow Whinney, it's she sells cokeaninny,
and to catch the poor fools' pennies she sells apples by the score.
she sells run and gin and cider, whiskey, ale and fly-beer
that makes them whoop ans stagger round the scow at Cowden Shore

Now, Dan Brown's a splendind singer, and in quadrilles he'll swing her,
good tidin's he will bering her of a new bank kill and more,
She'll laugh and she'll be funny for she knows he's got the money,
And she'll call him her darling honey from the scow at Cowden shore.

Now the dudes they spend their dollars in white shirts and paper collars,
and in good whiskey waller; they'll fight and git them tore.
they'll curse and they will wrangle, each other they will mangle,
They're called hard men to handle on the scow at Cowden shore.


NOTE:
This uses the same tune as the example from Willie Norrad.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 06 Jan 03 - 10:59 AM

N-The Scow on Cowden Shore
C-from the singing of Willie Norrad
A-
T-
S-108
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 c-8 d-4 d-8 d-4 b-8 b-8 a-4_a-4 b-8 c-4 a-8 a-4 G-8 F-8_D-4_D-4 F-8
L-My name is Lar-ry Gor-man to you I mean no har'rm You
H-
M-3G-4 G-8 G-4 b-8 d-8 d-4_d-4 d-8 e-8 d-4 c-4 a-8
L-need-n't be a-lar-rmed, you've heard of me be
B-9/8
H-
M-1d-5 R-5 b-4 c-8
L-fore, I can
B-6/8
H-
M-1d-4 d-8 e-4 c-8 c-8 a-4_a-4 b-8 c-4 a-8 b-8 a-4 F-8 D-8 R-8 E-4 F-8 G-8 G-4 D-4 D-8
L-make a song and sing it, and in-to me-tre bring it, and the ti-tle that I
H-
M-1d-8 d-4 d-4 c-8 a-4 G-8 E-4 a-8 G-5 R-5
L-give it is the Scow on Cow-den Shore.


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Subject: Add:The Scow on Cowden Shore (3)
From: MMario
Date: 06 Jan 03 - 03:37 PM

THE SCOW ON COWDEN SHORE (3)
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp235-236)

Mi-chael Hayd'n and Pat-rick Bug-gy on night got ver-y drug-gy,
Oh, the night was sark and fog-gy, you could hear the dead-ly roar;
There were men from Ri-chi-buc-to and more brom O-ro-moc-to,
Res-ti-gouch-ers and Pug-moosh-ers and Mac-Don-alds by the score

He could make a song and sing it, and into rhyme he'd bring it,
And the ti-tle I will give the tune is 'Fair-bank Bul-la-more'
There were men of dif-ferent ra-ces with their pale and swarth-y fa-ces,
and they were hard men to con-quer on the scow on Cow-en shore.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 07 Jan 03 - 01:52 PM

N-The Scow on Cowden Shore (3)
C-from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin
A-
T-
S-108
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-5 b-4 c-8 d-4 d-8 d-4 b-8 c-8 b-4_b-4 G-8 a-4 a-8 a-4 G-8 F-8 D-4 E-4 F-8
L-Mi-chael Hayd'n and Pat-rick Bug-gy one night got ver-y drug-gy, Oh, the
H-
M-3G-4 G-8 G-4 a-8 G-4 a-8 b-4 c-8 d-4 d-8 b-4 G-8
L-night was dark and fog-gy, you could hear the dead-ly
B-9/8
H-
M-1c-2_c-8 R-8 b-4 c-8
L-roar; there were
B-6/8
H-
M-5d-4 d-8 d-4 a-8 b-8 b-4_b-4 G-8 a-4 b-8 a-4 G-8 F-4 D-8 E-4 F-8 G-4 F-8 G-4 a-8
L-men from Ri-chi-buc-to and more from O-ro-moc-to, Res-ti-gouch-ers and Pug-
H-
M-5b-4 c-8 d-4 b-8 a-8 a-4 G-4 F-8 G-5 R-5 R-5 b-4 c-8 d-4 d-8 d-4 d-8
L-moosh-ers and Mac-Don-alds by the score He could make a song and
H-
M-5c-8 b-4_b-4 G-8 a-4 b-8 a-4 E-8 F-4 D-8 E-4 F-8 G-4 G-8 G-4 G-8 G-4 a-8 b-4 c-8
L-sing it, and in-to rhyme he'd bring it, And the ti-tle I will give the tune is
H-
M-5d-4 d-8 b-8 G-4 c-2_c-8 R-8 R-5 b-4 c-8 d-4 d-8 d-4 b-8 c-4 b-8 a-4 G-8
L-'Fair-bank Bul-la-more' There were men of dif-ferent ra-ces with their
H-
M-5a-4 b-8 a-4 E-8 F-4 D-8 E-4 F-8 G-4 F-8 G-4 a-8 b-4 d-8 d-4 G-8 F-4 a-8 G-4 F-8
L-pale and swarth-y fa-ces, and they were hard men to con-quer on the scow on Cow-en
H-
M-1G-5 R-5
L-shore.


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Subject: ADD: The Miads of Simcoe
From: MMario
Date: 07 Jan 03 - 02:08 PM

THE MAIDS OF SIMCOE
(from the singing of Archie Lant)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - pp241-242)

Come all ye maids of Sim-coe, give ear to what I write,
In cross-ing Lake On-ta-ri-o where rafts-men take de-light.
In cross-ing Lake On-ta-ri-o as jol-ly rafts-men do,
While your low-land, loaf-ing farm-ers can stay at home with you.

The lowland loafing farmers they thell their girls fine tales
All of the dangers they go through in crossing over their fields,
In cutting off their grass so green that's all what they can do,
Whilst us poor jolly raftsmen runs they St. Lawrence through.

And when the sun it does do down, away they'll swing their ploughs,
And whenm it does grow darker, it's homeward they march on,
And when the clock strikes eight or nine off to their beds they'll crawl,
Whilst us poor jolly raftsmen stand many's the bitter squall.

The wind blows from the mountains, which toss up upside down,
And sets us in confusion for fear we'd all be drowned.
The wind blows from the west, my boys, which drives our raft along,
Cheer up, Cheer up, my lively lads, your balsom oars spring on!

It's lee bore down and lee bore round, and set your sails to right!
It's we'll sail out immediately and leave those lakes behind.
It's we'll sail out immediately and bid those lakes adieu.
We'll steer our course all for Quebec, all sorrows to subdue.

All sorrows to subdue, my boys, since joy has come to town;
We'll call into a tev-er-en and there we'll all sit down.
We'll call for eggs and brandy, boys, and merrilye pass it round;
We'll drownd all sorrow in a glass since joy has come to town!

Since joy has come to town, my boys, it's homeward we'll march on,
To see our wives and sweethears that we've left behind to mourn.
We'll dance and sing and merrilye be as we oft-time done before,
And when our money is all spent, we'll hunt the woods for more.

Doerflinger notes the last two words were spoken.


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Subject: Tune Add: THE MAIDS OF SIMCOE
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 09:18 AM

N-The Maids of Simcoe
C-From the singing of Archie Lant
A-
T-
S-100
K-E
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 B-8 E-4 F-8 G-4 b-8 a-5 G-4 E-8 F-4 D-8 E-4 E-8 E-5 R-4 a-8
L-come all ye maids of Sim-coe, give ear to what I write, In
H-
M-5e-4 e-8 d-4 c-8 c-8_b-8 b-8 b-8_a-8 G-8 a-4 b-8 c-8_b-8 a-8 b-8 R-4 R-4 a-8 e-4 e-8 d-4 c-8
L-Cross-ing Lake On-ta-ri-o where rafts-men take de-light, In cross-ing Lake On
H-
M-5c-8_b-8 b-8 b-8_a-8 G-8 a-4 b-8 c-8_d-8 e-8 b-4 R-8 B-4 B-8 E-4 F-8 G-4 b-8 a-5 G-4 E-8
L-ta-ri-o as jol-ly rafts-men do, While your low-land, loaf-ing farm-ers can
H-
M-2F-4 D-8 E-4 E-8 E-4 R-8 R-5
L-stay at home with you.


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Subject: ADD: Jack Haggerty / The Flat River Girl
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 09:47 AM

There are already three example of this in the DT (Flat River Girl, Jack Haggerty, Jack Haggerty (2)) but from the text this appears to be different enough to at least mention:

JACK HAGGETY /THE FLAT RIVER GIRL
(from the singing of Willis Norrad)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp245-246)

My occupation is river man, as you may well know,
My name is engraved on the rocks down below,
Over hills and rocky mountains I'm very well known.
they call me Jack Jaggerty, I'm the pride of the town.

I worked on the river by night and by day,
Till a blacksmith's pretty daughter my heart stole away,
She was neat, tall and handsome by a bright peraly stream,
And my thought were with Annie; She haunted my dreams.

So I worked on the river till I earned a large stake,
I was steadfast and loyal, I ne'er played a rake,
For my thoughts were of Annie by the Flat River side,
and I always intended to make her my bride.

But one day on the river a letter I recieved,
Telling me from her promises she herself would relieve.
She would wed with another a long time delayed,
And the next time I'd see her she would not be a maid.

On her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame.
she's the cause of my ruin and all my ill fame.
She cut loose the rigging that god would soon tie
and left me to wander till the day that I die.

Note: Doerflinger gives the fifth verse set to the tune, no variations listed.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 10:45 AM

N-Jack Haggerty /The Flat River Girl
C-From the singing of Willis Norrad
A-
T-
S-100
K-D
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 a-8 a-8 D-4 F-4 a-4 a-8 G-8 R-4 C-4 E-4 D-5 C-8 D-5 R-8 F-9 F-0
L-On her moth-er, Jane Tuck-er I lay all the blame. She's the
H-
M-5F-5 E-4 F-8 G-8 F-5_F-8 G-8 a-4 c-4 b-4 a-5 R-8 a-4 a-4 d-4 e-4
L-cause of my ru-in and all my ill fame. She cut loose the
H-
M-5d-8 a-5 R-4 F-4 E-4 D#4 E-4 b-5 R-8 a-4 D-4 F-4 a-4 D-4 F-8 R-8
L-rig-ging that God would soon tie, And left me to wan-der til the
H-
M-2D-8 D-8 E-4 D-4 C-4 D-5 R-8
L-day that I die


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 11:27 AM

THE RED LIGHT SALOON
(From the Singing of Willis Norrad)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp249-250)

A trip down to Bang-or, the Forth of Ju-ly:
To make my con-nect-tion with a train I did try.
The train it being late, as you all will know soon,
I was forced to take a trip to the Red Light Sa-loon.

I boldly walked in and stepped up to the bar,
When a saucy young damsel says, "Have a cigar"
A cigar I did take, in a chair I sat down,
When a saucy young damsel came tripping around.

She boldly came over , sit down on my knee,
Saying Jack you're a woodsman, that I plainly see.
Saying, Jack you're a woodsman, and that we all know.
Your muscle is hard from your head to your toe.


Per Doerflinger - "a song that will never be printed in full"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 11:48 AM

N-The Red Light Saloon
C-from the singing of Willis Norrad
A-
T-
S-207
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 b-4 E-4 G-4 b-4 E-4 G-4 G-4 F-4 D-4 D-4 E-4 R-4 b-4
L-A trip down to Bang-or, The Fourth of Ju-ly: To
H-
M-5d-4 e-4 e-4 E-4 G-4 b-8 b-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 b-8 R-8 b-8 e-4 e-4 e-4 E-4 G-4 b-4
L-make my con-nec-tion with a train I did try. The train it being
H-
M-5c-4 c-4 c-4 b-4 R-4 b-8 b-8 E-4 G-4 b-8 b-8 E-4 G-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 D-4
L-late, as you all will know soon, I was forced to take a trip to the Red light Sa-
H-
M-1E-4 R-2
L-"loon


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Charley Noble
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 11:49 AM

Couldn't resist adding some more verses for the above, courtesy of Oscar Brand:

Anon
From Singing of Oscar Brand
Tune: Sweet Betsey from Pike

The Red Light Saloon


D-----------------------A----------D
It was early one morning I walked into town.
------------------------A--------D
In sweet recreation I was strolling a-round,
-------G----------------------------D
When I spied this hotel in the fore after-noon,
------------------------------A-----------D
It was sporting a sign said "The Red Light Sa-loon."


I boldly walked in and stepped up to the bar,
Where a pretty young lady said, "Have a cigar."
Well, I took that cigar saying, "Thanks for the boon."
But she said, "That's our way in the Red Light Saloon."

She mussed up my hair and sat down on my knee,
Saying, "You are a logger, that's easy to see."
Saying, "You are a lumberjack, that we all know,
For your muscles are hard from your head to your toe."

She proceeded to test if my muscles were right,
Till I smoked that cigar without striking a light;
My head it was rising just like a balloon,
From the treatment I got at the Red Light Saloon.

It was early next morning I bade her good bye,
She waved from the window, a tear in her eye,
And I did not find out till the middle of June,
I was carrying a keepsake from the Red Light Saloon.

I cursed that young lady till the heavens turned blue,
And with whiskey and women I swore I was through,
But with all of my swearing I'd give my fortune,
Just to be back in bed at the Red Light Saloon.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 12:28 PM

Tom Dixon


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Subject: Add:The Gull Decoy
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 10:03 AM

THE GULL DECOY
(Larry Gorman)
(From the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp255-256)

I take no books, nor I read no pa-pers,
I have no mon-ey to spend or lose,
But ev-'ry Sun-day a-mong my neigh-bors,
I run a-round to hear the news!

'Twas all for spite and satisfaction
I set my dog on an orphan boy,
And all those other dirty actions
That adds more grief to the Gull Decoy,

When I stand up and begin to whistle,
the gulls they all begin to fly,
And for this occupation
they call me the Gull Decoy.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 11:54 AM

N-The Gull Decoy
C-Larry Gorman
A-
T-
S-92
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-2R-2 R-8 F-8 G-8 a-0_b-0 c-4 R-8 b-0 c-0
L-I take no books, Nor I
B-4/4
H-
M-1d-8 d-8 c-8 a-8 R-5 c-8
L-read no pa-pers, I
B-3/4
H-
M-1d-8 d-8 c-0 c-9 R-8 c-8
L-Have no mon-ey to
H-
M-2c-9 b-0 G-8 R-4 G-8 b-8 c-0_d-0 d-4 T34ad-8 R-8 c-8
L-spend or lose, But ev-'ry Sun x day a
H-
M-4d-8 a-8 F-4 G-8 R-8 a-8 b-8 c-8 b-4 R-8 a-8 G-8 G-8 F-4 R-8 R-3
L-mong my neigh-bors, I run a-round to hear the news!


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Subject: ADD:Beware of Larry Gorman
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 12:04 PM

BEWARE OF LARRY GORMAN
(Larry Gorman)
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p 258)

And when they see me com-ing,
their eyes sticks out like prongs,
Say-in' Be-ware of Lar-ry Gorman;
He's the man that makes the songs!

I told here that her bread was good,
Likewise her teas was strong;
But little she knew I was Gorman,
The make who made the songs!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 12:14 PM

N-Beware of Larry Gorman
C-Larry Gorman - from singing H.Hinchey
A-
T-
S-114
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 E-8 G-4 a-8 b-4 c-8 d-5 d-8 R-8 d-8 c-4 c-8 G-8_a-8 b-8 c-4 R-8 b-8 b-8 c-8
L-And when they see me com-ing, Their eyes sticks out like prongs, Say-in', Be-
H-
M-4d-4 d-8 G-4 F%8 F%8 D-8 R-8 D-4 C-8 D-8_E-8 F-8 G-4 F-8 G-5 R-5
L-ware of Lar-ry Gor-man; He's the man that makes the songs!


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Subject: Add:Duffy's Hotel
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 12:34 PM

DUFFY'S HOTEL
(from the singing of Williis Norrad)

If you're long-ing for fun or en-joy-ment,
If you want to go out on a spree,
Come a-long with me o-ver to Boies-town
On the banks of the Mi-ra-mi-chi.
You'll meet with a roya-al re-cep-tion,
the truth un-to you I'll re-late.
On the eight-eenth of May I ar-rived here,
from Fred-'ric-ton came by the freight.

I'm employed by a man named E. kenney,
A gentleman you all know well,
J.P. for the parish of Stanley
And he puts up at Duffey's hotel.
...
...
...
...

The other night I was out on a racket,
I tell you 'twas something immense
We collared a Shanghai rooster,
And he just cost us seventeen cents.
He was sick with the croup and the measles,
They said he was too poor to sell,
But I guess he'll make hash for the boarders
That hang out at Duffy's Hotel.

One night I was out to a party;
'Twas held in the Mansion below,
A row was kicked up in the kitchen
I tell you it wasn't too slow.
They upset the chairs and the tables
cause the Pleasant Ridge pigs for to yell
the row was kicked up by Delaney,
A sucker from Duffy's hotel.

Kind friends, I must bid you good evening,
Or else you will fear I'm a turk,
If I loiter 'round here any longer
some fellow might give me a jerk!
I'll go back to the place of my childhoord,
In peace and contentment to dwell,
Bid adieu to the kind friends and boarders
That hang 'round at Duffy's Hotel!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 02:48 PM

N-Duffy's Hotel
C-from the singing of Willis Norrad
A-
T-
S-189
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 G-8 F-8 E-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-4 R-4 c-8 c-8
L-If your're long-ing for fun or en-joy-ment, If you
H-
M-5c-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 a-4 G-4 F-3_F-4 R-4 G-8 F-8 E-4 G-4 F-4
L-want to go out on a spree, Come a-long with me
H-
M-5E-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-2 c-8 c-8 c-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 a-4 F-4
L-o-ver to Boies-town On the banks of the Mi-ra-mi-
H-
M-5E-5 R-5 R-2 c-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 e-4 d-4 c-4 c-4 b-2_
L-chi. You'll meet with a roy-al re-cep-tion,
H-
M-5b-2 b-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 c-4 b-4 G-4 F-3 R-2 G-8 F-8
L-The truth un-to you I'll re-late. On the
H-
M-5E-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-2 c-4 c-4 b-4 G-4
L-eight-eenth of May I ar-rived here, From Fred-'ric-ton
H-
M-2b-4 a-4 F-4 E-3
L-came by the freight.


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Subject: Add:The Wife of Kelso
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 03:30 PM


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WIFE OF KELSO /THE WILY AULD CARLE
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 03:45 PM

THE WIFE OF KELSO /THE WILY AULD CARLE
(from the singing of 'Duke' Neilson)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p281)

There was an old woman in Ire-land, in Ire-land she did dwell;
She dear-ly loved her hus-band, and an-other man twice as well!
[Sing fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle ad-dy, fa-lad-dle doo-dle day;
Sing fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle ad-dy, fa-lad-dle doo-dle day]

She went unto a doctor to see if she could find,
To see if she could find anything to make the old man blind

Now, the doctor give three marrowbone, for him to suck them all,
And after he had sucked them, he couldn't see any at all.

Now the doctor met the old man, and to him explained the scheme.
Be jappers, says the old man, I'll act upon the scene!

She gave to him the marrowbones for him to suck them all,
And after he had sucked them he couldn't see any at all.

Oh, wifie, dearest wifie, on land I cannot stay.
I'd gladly go and drown myself if I only could find the way.

Oh husband, dearest husband, you shall not go astray,
For I will go along with you and gladly show you the way.

They toddled on and on and on, until the came to the brim
Oh, wifie, dearest wifie, you'll have to push me in.

the old womand got back a step or two and suddenly made a spring.
The old man side-stepped and she went tumbling in!

She swam around and round and round and then in front of him
the old man grabbed a long pole and shoved her head within.

The old man grabbed a long pole and shoved her head within
Now , wasn't she a darned old fool, to think that I was blin'.


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Subject: tune add: wife of kelso
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 04:18 PM

N-The Wife of Kelso /the Wily auld carle
C-
A-
T-
S-189
K-C
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 c-8 e-8 d-8 c-8 d-8 d-8 b-8 c-5 a-4 G-8 e-4 c-8 d-4 b-8 c-4 R-8 R-4 G-8
L-There was an old wo-man in Ire-land, in Ire-land she did dwell; She
H-
M-5e-4 e-8 d-4 d-8 c-5 b-8 b-8 b-8 a-8 b-8 d-8 c-4 a-8 G-4 R-8 E-4 F-8 G-8 E-8 G-8 a-4 b-8
L-dear-ly loved her hus-band, and an-oth-er man twice as well! Sing fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle
H-
M-5G-8 E-8 R-8 R-4 G-8 G-8 G-8 c-8 b-4 d-8 c-5 E-4 F-8 G-8 E-8 G-8 a-4 b-8 G-8 E-8 R-8 R-4 G-8
L-ad-dy fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle-day; Sing Fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle ad-dy fa-
H-
M-2G-8 G-8 c-8 b-4 d-8 c-5 R-5
L-lad-dle-ee doo-dle day!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Jan 03 - 04:27 PM

Joe,

How could you forget "I'm a Lumberjack?"

wdyat24


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 11 Jan 03 - 05:27 PM

MMario, you're a treasure!


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Subject: ADD: Were You Ever in Dumbarton?
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 11:14 AM


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 11:22 AM

Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?
Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
Where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?

My love she is so neat and small, she won't have me at all
But try to get her full and then she'll marry me.
Oh if I had her, if I had her,
Oh if I had her, happy I would be.
Oh if I had her, if I had her,
Oh if I had her, happy I would be.

Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?
Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
Where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 12:22 PM

N-Were You Ever in Dumbarton?
C-from the singing of Archie Lant
A-
T-
S-120
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-1R-2 A-8 C-8 E-9 E-0 E-9 E-0 G-8 E-8 b-9 b-0 b-9 b-0 G-8 b-8 c-9 c-0 c-9 b-0 a-8 E-8
L-Were you ev-er in Dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tar-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan,
B-4/4
H-
M-1F-7 F-7 F-7 F-9 E-0 C-4 B-9 B-0
L-lit-tle a-bove the knee? Were you
B-3/4
H-
M-4E-9 E-0 E-9 F-0 G-8 E-8 b-9 b-0 b-9 b-0 G-8 b-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 b-8 G-8 E-7 E-7 E-7 E-9 F-0 D-4
L-ev-er in Dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tar-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan lit-tle a-bove the knee?
B-2/4
H-
M-5R-4 b-4 b-9 d-0 e-9 d-0 c-8 b-8 G-9 b-0 b-9 e-0 d-9 e-0 c-5 d-8
L-My love she is so neat and small, she won't have me at all. But
B-3/4
H-
M-5e-8 f-8 e-0 c-9 b-8 G-8 a-8 F-8 G-0 E-9 C-9_B-0 E-4 E-8 E-8 G-0 E-9 b-5 b-8 G-0 b-9 c-4 c-8 c-8 b-0 G-9
L-try to get her full and then she'll mar-ry me. Oh, if I had her, if I had her, Oh, if I had her,
H-
M-4F-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 D-4 E-4 E-8 E-8 G-0 E-9 b-5 b-8 G-0 b-9 c-4 c-8 c-8 b-8 G-8
L-hap-py would I be. Oh, if I had her, if I had her, Oh, if I had her,
B-4/4
H-
M-1F-8 G-8 F-8 G-8 E-4 B-9 C-0
L-hap-py would I be! Were you
B-3/4
H-
M-3E-8 E-8 E-9 E-0 G-8 E-8 b-8 b-8 b-9 b-0 G-8 b-8 c-9 c-0 c-9 c-0 b-8 G-8
L-ev-er in Dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tar-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan,
B-4/4
H-
M-1F-7 F-7 F-7 F-9 E-0 C-4 B-9 C-0
L-lit-tle a-bove the knee? Were you
B-3/4
H-
M-5E-8 E-8 E-9 E-0 G-8 E-8 E-9 b-0 b-9 a-0 G-8 b-8 c-8 c-8 c-9 c-0 b-8 G-8 F-7 F-7 F-7 F-9 G-0 E-4_E-3
L-ev-er in dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tart-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan, lit-tle a-bove the knee?


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Subject: Add: Sally Monroe
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 02:59 PM

see DT salmunro (Sally Munro)

SALLY MONROE
(from the Singing of Mrs. Mary Grieve)
(collected by Samuel P. Bayard)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp303-304)

Come all ye young fe-males, I pray you'll at-tend
To these twa or thress let-ters that I've new-ly penned,
To let you un-der-stand the hard-ships I un-der-go,
When first I fell in love wi' yong Sal-ly Mon-roe.

I wrote her a letter, a letter I did send;
I sent it with a comrade I thought to be a friend.
Instead of bein' a friend to me, he proved to be a foe,
and he never gave that letter to young Sally Monroe.

It was on a sunday morning about six o'clock,
'Twas all in a sudden our ship did strike a rock,
Three hundred and fifty were all sank below,
And out among that number I lost Sally Monroe.

'Twas from her aged parents I stole her away,
And that will grieve my conscience till my dying day,
It was not for to injure her that I did do so,
And all my life I'll mou-rn for young Sally Monroe!


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Subject: Tune Add: SALLY MONROE
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 03:32 PM

N-Sally Monroe
C-from the singing of Mary Grieve
A-
T-
S-100
K-G
B-2/2
F-
H-
M-1R-3 B-4 E-2 E-4 F-4 G-2 G-4 a-4 b-2 b-4 c#4
L-Come all ye young fe-males. I pray you'll at-
H-
M-4b-3 R-8 B-8 E-5 E-8 E-4 F-4 G-2 G-4 R-8 a-8 b-5_c#8 d-4 c-4
L-tend To these twa or three let-ters that I've new-ly
H-
M-4b-2 R-4 a-4 b-5 a-8 b-4 c#4 d-2 d-4 b-4 a-4 R-8 a-8 b-8_c#8 d-4
L-penned, To let you un-der-stand the hard-ships I un-der
H-
M-4e-2 R-4 e-4 d-4 c#4 d-4 e-4 b-8_a-5 G-4 E-4 F-2 E-4 E-4
L-go, When first I fell in love wi' young Sal-ly Mon-
H-
M-1E-2 R-2
L-roe.


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Subject: ADD:Dark-Eyed Sailor
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 04:11 PM

see also DT songfiles darkeyed; darkeye2

THE DARK EYED SAILOR
(tune from singing of J. E. Shepard)
(verses compiled from multiple sources)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp300-301)

'Twas of a maid-en both young and fair,
Whilst walk-ing out for to take the air.
She met a sail-or all on her way,
And I paid at-ten-tion,
And I paid at-ten-tion
to hear what they might say.

He says, Fair maid, why roam alone?
For the day's far spent and the night's coming on.
While crystal tears from her eyes did flow
It's for my dark-eyed sailor,
Oh, me dark-eyed sailor
That proved my overthrow!

Then three long lyears since he left this land;
A new gold ring he took off his hand,
He broke a token, gave one half to me,
While the other half's lying
While the other half's lying
At the bottom of the sea.

Oh, he says, fair maid, drive him from off your mind
For as good a sailor as him you'll find!
Love turns aside and cold does grow
Like a winter's morning
Like a winter's morning
When the hills are covered with snow

His coal-black eyes and curly hair,
His flattering tongue did my heart ensnare
Genteel he was, no rake like you,
to advise a maiden
to advise a maiden
to slight the jacket blue!

A tarry sailor I'll ne'er disdain,
But keep always true till he comes again.
So drink his health, here's a piec of coin,
But my dark-eyed sailor
But my dark-eyed sailor
Still claims this heart of min.

When William did the ring enfold
She seemed distracted idst joe and woe
You're welcome, William; I have lands and gold
for my dark-eyed sailor
For my dark-eyed sailor
So manly ture and bold!

Down in a cottage by a river side
In peace and harmony they now reside,
So girls, prove true whilst your lover's away
Oft a cloudy morning
Oft a cloudy morning
Brings forth a pleasant day.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 04:34 PM

N-The Dark Eyed Sailor (3)
C-
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-5 D-8 a-8 a-8 a-4 G-8 G-8 F-8 G-8 D-5 D-8 D-8 D-8 c-4 a-8 a-8 c-8 d-8 a-5 c-8 c-8 F-8
L-'Twas of a maid-en both young and fair, Whilst walk-ing out for to take the air. She met a
H-
M-5E-8 D-4 D-8 F-8 G-8 a-5 a-0 a-0 a-8 C-8 D-8 C-4 D-0 D-0 a-8 c-8 d-8 c-4 d-8 G-4 a-4 F-4 E-4
L-Sail-or all on her way, And I paid at-ten-tion, And I paid at-ten-tion to hear what they might
H-
M-1F-4 R-2
L-say.


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Subject: Add:The Silk Merchant's Daughter
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 10:13 AM

See also - slkmrcht - DT The Silk Merchant's Daughter

THE SILK MERCHANTS DAUGHTER
(from the singing of Archie Lant)
(DOerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp296-297)

Oh hold your hand, butcher! the fair one she cried.
Indeed and I'm only an innocent main.
I'm a rich merchant's daughter , from London I be,
And you see what I've come to by the loving of thee.**

Oh, it's then the hot blood to his head it did pour,
Saying Since you are the loved on that I do adore,
Since you are the loved one that I do love best,
With my sweet, happy life, love, it's I wid I die first.

They lots were got ready and in a bog put,
and each one of us our own lot we drew,
The innocent fair one, the short lot she drew;
She was to be killed for to feed the whole crew.

They lots were got ready and in a bag put,
And each one of us our own lot we drew,
Be quick in lyou motion; let the bus'ness be done.
But before the blow was struck, oh we all heard a gun.

Oh, hold you hand, butcher, our captain he cried,
Some port or some harbor we are drawing nigh.
And while we were a-sailing with a sweet, pleasant tide,
We came to a city close by the sea side.

This couple got married, as I've hear the people say,
There was great rejoiucing on their wedding day.
The bells of the village did echo and ring,
The boys they did dance, and the girls they did sing.


** last two lines of each verse repeat


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 10:49 AM

N-The Silk Merchant's Daughter
C-from the singing of Archie Lant
A-
T-
S-120
K-G
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 D-9_G-0 G-4 G-4 a-8_G-8 F%4 F-4 G-8_a-8 c-4 c-4 d-8_c-8 a-5 R-8 c-4
L-They lots were got read-y and in a bag put, And
H-
M-5b-4_a-4 G-4 F-4 D-4 F-4 G-4 E-4 C-4 D-5 R-8 D-8_c-8 c-4 c-4 c-0_e-9
L-Each one of us our own lot we drew; This in-no-cent
H-
M-5d-0_b-9 b-2 a-8_G-8 G-4 G-4 a-0_b-9 D-5 R-8 D-9_G-0 G-2 F%9 G-0 a-4 d-4
L-fair one, the short lot she drew; She was to be killed for
H-
M-5b-4 c-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-5 R-8 a-8_b-8 c-4 c-4 c-0_e-9 d-8_b-8 b-4_b-4 a-8_G-8 G-4
L-to feed the whole crew. This in-no-cent fair one, the short
H-
M-5G-4 a-0_b-9 D-4_D-8 R-8 D-9_G-0 G-4_G-4 F%9 G-0 a-4 d-4 b-4 c-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-4_
L-lot she drew, She was to be killed for to feed the whole
H-
M-1G-4 R-2
L-crew


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Subject: ADD:Charles Gustavus Anderson
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 11:08 AM

see DT - Saladin Mutiny ; The Saladin Mutiny (sldnmtny & sldnmty2)

CHARLES GUSTAVUS ANDERSON
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp291-292)

Now, Charles Gus-ta-vus An-der-son is my right and prop-er name.
Al-though I lie in cus-to-dy, I'll ne'er de-ny the same.
I was raised by hodn-est par-ents, al-though I die in scorn.
Oh, Bud-lieve me, now I much la-ment the hour that I was born!

Now my father was a shipwright; I might have been the same.
He taught me good exampdles, on him I lay no blame.
And for my poor old mother, for me she has wept sore.
Whedn she hears of my misfortune she cadn but grieve the more.

Note: per Doerflinger the added consonents in words were typical of many older singers.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 11:34 AM

N-Charles Gustavus Anderson
C-from the singing of Herbert Hinchey
A-
T-
S-198
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 C-4 E-2 F-4 G-2 a#4 b-2 a#4 G-4 E-4 F-4
L-Now, Charles Gus-ta-vus An-der-son is my
H-
M-5E-8_C-5 D-4 E-2 D-4 E-5 R-5 R-2 G-4 b-2 b-4
L-right and prop-er name. Al-though I
H-
M-5c-4_d-4 e-4 e-2 d-4 e-4 R-4 d-4 c-2 F-4 F-4_G-4 a-4
L-lie in cus-to-dy, I'll ne'er de-ny the
H-
M-5b-5 R-5 R-2 G-8 G-8 b-2 G-4 b-2 c-8_d-8 e-3
L-same. I was raised by hadn-est par-
H-
M-5d-2 e-4 e-2 e-4 G-2 b-4 c-5 R-5 e-2 d-4
L-ents, al-though I die in scorn. Oh, bud-
H-
M-5b-2 b-4 G-8_F-8 R-4 G-4 E-8_D-5 E-4 F-2 G-4 G-8_E-5 F-4
L-lieve me, now I much la-ment the hour that
H-
M-2E-2 E-4 E-4 R-2
L-I was born!


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Subject: ADD: The Jealous Lover
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 01:30 PM

see DT for additional versions:

THE JEALOUS LOVER
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp287-288)

It was down in a lone green val-ley
Where the ro-ses bloom and fade,
there lies a jeal-ous lov-er
In love with a bea-ti-ful maid.
One night the moon shoe bright-ly
The stars were shin-ing too,
And to the maid-en's cot-tage
This jeal-ous lov-er drew.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 01:38 PM

oops!

see DT for additional versions:

THE JEALOUS LOVER
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp287-288)

It was down in a lone green val-ley
Where the ro-ses bloom and fade,
there lies a jeal-ous lov-er
In love with a bea-ti-ful maid.
One night the moon shoe bright-ly
The stars were shin-ing too,
And to the maid-en's cot-tage
This jeal-ous lov-er drew.

Come love and we will wander
Down where those woods are gay.
While wandering we will ponder
And plan our wedding day.
So arm in arm they wandered,
The night birds sang above.
This jealous lover grew angry
With the beautiful girl he loved.

The night was dark and dreary.
She said I'm afraid to stay.
I've grown so tired and weary,
I must retrace my way.
Retrace your steps? No, never,
For you have met your doom!
So bid farewell forever
To Parents, friends and home.

Down on her knees before him
She pleaded for her life,
But deep within her bosom
He plunged a dreadful knife.
Oh willie, my poor Willie,
Why have you taken my life?
You know I've always loved you
And wanted to be your wife.

I have never decieved you*
Was her last and dying cry.
I will forgive you Willie
then she closed her eyes and died.


* use second half of melody for last verse.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 02:10 PM

N-The Jealous Lover
C-from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin
A-
T-
S-88
K-G
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 F-9 F-0 G-2 F-9 a-0 b-2 D-4 F-4 E-2_E-5 R-8 E-9 E-0
L-It was down in a lone green val-ley Where the
H-
M-5D-2 D-4 F-4_E-4 F-4 G-3_G-4 R-5 G-8 G-2_G-9 a-0
L-ro-ses bloom and fade, There lies a
H-
M-5b-2 D#4 F-4 E-2_E-4 R-4 E-4 D-2 D-9 E-0 F-4 E-4 F-4
L-jeal-ous lov-er In love with a beau-ti-ful
H-
M-5G-3_G-4 R-5 G-8 a-2 R-8 a#8 d-2 c-4 b-4 G-2_
L-maid. One night the moon shone bright-ly
H-
M-5G-4 R-5 b-8 c-2 E-4 G-2 E-4 D-3_D-4 R-4 G-4
L-The stars were shin-ing too, and
H-
M-5G-2 a-4 b-2 D#4 F-4 E-2_E-4 R-4 E-4 D-2 D-4
L-to the maid-en's cot-tage This jeal-ous
H-
M-2F-8_E-5 F-4 G-3
L-lov-er drew.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MILLMAN SONG (John Calhoun?)
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 12:49 PM

THE MILLMAN SONG
(John Calhoun?)
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - -pp285-286)

You tender hearted Christians, I pray you lend an ear
To a sad and mournful story you air about to hear.
'Twas of a love-lye country girl, young, innocent and fair
Content and free she seemed to be, without one thought or care.

Just blooming into womanhood, that pure and holy state,
And God ordained should be sustained in purity complete;
But alas, how often do we find, as down life's streams we glide,
Some gentle maid that's been betrayed away from virtue's side.

This was the sin that turned the tide of Mary Cuplon's life,
And truthfully she was to be a mother, not a wife.
And him that she has trusted to protect her through the strife,
To hide his shame and save his name took this poor creature's life.

As evening shadows gently fell o'er streamlets and o'er hill,
Young Mary went with purpose bent a meeting to fulfill.
Young Millman on that evening was waiting for her near,
With a murderous heart to do his part and end this girl's career.

They talked a while on matters; 'twas formless to their view,
This trusting maid seemed not afraid to walk some distance, too,
Until they came to a lonely spot well suited to the deed.
His murderous heart then did act its part; his victim there did bleed.

He clasped her then within his arms and hast unto the shore,
And soon afloat within a boat prepared by him before,
A rope he tied around her waist, and after tied a stone,
One gentle splash, and like a flash the murderer was alone.

Alone? Oh, no. All-seeing eyes was watching from on high
And God is just; the murderer must from His great vengeance fly.
The brand of Cain upon his brow, no rest again he'll find
Until upon the gallows high he'll expiate his crime.

Now, the river's searched, the body found; Now, Millman, hold your own,
For the best-laid plans of mice and men are oft-times overthrown.
The very means that you've employed to ward suspicion off,
And her sad end will surely tend to cut your young life short.

The rope, the rock, the pistol shot, the meeting at the gate,
Will help to hang the guilty man and end this sad estate,
Now. an inquest and a verdict next in quick succession came,
And to this awful tragedy they coupled Millman's name.

Now when the judge he read the sentence, a tear bedimmed his eye.
On the twenty-second day of June, Young Millman you must die.
...
...

Now, parents, here a warning take: no matter what in rue
You know you must discard the trust that God hath given you,
Until upon that rising day you're called before the throne
To answer for your children's sins as well as for your own.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 01:46 PM

N-The Millman Song
C-from the singing of Herbert Hinchey
A-John Calhoun?
T-
S-180
K-Eb
B-6/4
F-
H-
M-2R-1 R-4 @-4 C-4 R-4 C-4 D-4_E-4 F-4
L-You ten-der heart-ed
H-
M-2G-2_F-4 E-8_C-4 R-8 D-4 C-8_@-5 B-4 C-2 B%4
L-Chris-tians, I pray you lend an
H-
M-2C-2 R-2 F-4 F-4 G-2 a%8_b%8 c-2 c-4
L-ear To a sad and mourn-ful
H-
M-2c-2_b%4 G-2 G-4 E-8_C-5 D-4 C-2 C-4
L-sto-ry you air a-bout to
H-
M-2C-2 R-2 R-4 F-4 G-2 G-4 c-2 d-4
L-hear. 'Twas of a love-lye
H-
M-2e-2 e-4 d-5 R-8 d-4 c-2 C-4 E-2 F-4
L-coun-try girl, young, in-no-cent and
H-
M-2F-3 R-2 G-8_a%8 b-4 b-2 F-4 R-4 G-4
L-fair. Con-tent and free she
H-
M-3F-4_C-4 D-4 B-2 D-4 F-2 E-4 C-2 C-4 C-4 R-2 R-2 R3
L-seemed to be, with-out one thought or care.


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Subject: ADD:I'm a Decent Boy from Ireland
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 02:15 PM

I'M A DECENT BOY FROM IRELAND
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp278-279)

I'm a de-cent boy from Ire-land, I've claimed it as my home.
Quite sor-ry for to tell you, boys, I was forced fro it to roam.
Brought up by hon-est par-ents, who loved their Pad-dy dear,
And of-ten by the fire-side they would whis-per in my ear:

Be kind to your old par-ents when their locks are turn-ing gray.
Re-mem-ber boys, in child-hood they have nursed you man-y's the day.
they have treat-ed you with kind-ness, with man-y* and man-y's* the smile.
You'll nev-er know their val-ue till they lay be-neath the soil.

At first I did not notice that I had led a deperate life,
And a couple of years after, I got myself a wife.
But Fortune proved unknow-m; Death came to my cabin door
And stole away my bonny bride I was forced to roam once more.

Kind friends, don't be offended; I would like to please you all.
If ever I pass this dear old town I will make another call.
We will sing the same songs over as we did in days of yore.
Be kind to your old parents, although they're old and poor


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Subject: Add:The Famous Light Brigade
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 02:57 PM

THE FAMOUS LIGHT BRIGADE
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp276-277)

It was a fa-mous sto-ry, pro-claim it far and wide,
And let your child-ren's chidl-ren re-ech-o it with pride;
When old Car-di-gan, the fear-less, his name im-mor-tal made,
When he charged through the Rooosh-ian val-ley,
with his fa-mous Light Brig-ade.

Brave Nolan brought the order, Good God, can it be true?
For me to charge those massive gunds with this brigade so few!
It is the order given, sir, and you must obey.
So take my tip and ride away, and go to hell with them all.

Then is was a famous story, proclaim it far and wide
And let your children's chidlren re-echo it with pride;
When old Cardigan, the fearless, his name immortal made,
When he charged through the Rooosh-ian valley,
with his famous Light Brigade.


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Subject: ADD:Rufus's Mare
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 04:02 PM

RUFUS'S MARE
(George Calhoun)
(from the singing of David Alexander Smith)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp264-265)

Now, poor Ru-fus he has come to town.
No won-der that he is cast down.
It's the first time in man-y's the day
that he has walked here all the way.

Come listen to his tale of woe
And then the truth you soon shall know.
The reason why he walks today
Old Tozer stole his mare away.

When Tozer gave that mare to me
A useless brute she seemed to be
Upon three legs she had to go
The fourth one dangling to and fro.

Her hoofs then I did oil and pare.
I tended her with watchful care.
Before the year was at an end,
My little mare begin to men.

When she was well and free from pain
And fit to take the road again.
I lent her to that damned old clown
To go as far as Frederictown.

He drove to Estey's that same day
And there he traded my mare away.
A Central note that would not pass
He gave to bind the bargain fast.

It's when I heard what he had done,
I soon resolved to stop his fun.
I quickly followed on his track;
My little mare I soon brought back.

As I was in my field at work
It's there I saw this useless Turk
coming toward me through the field
His son-in-law was at his heels.

They never stopped to shake my hand;
My little mare they did demand.
Being two to one, I was forced to yield
And so they led her from the field.

Now I am cast down and sore oppressed
For the want of her I cannot rest.
I have no team to go to mill
Or haul my wood from off the hill.

Her empty stall, I view it now;
She used to stand besdie the cow.
No stall between them did divide;
To kick the cow she never tried.

Her harness hangs up by the wall.
I have no use for it at all.
The pung in which I took delight
It now seems hateful to my sight.

At length I heard this villian preach,
His words my heart could never reach.
Of going to Heaven I've heard him boast,
But down in Hell he'll surely roast!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 10:54 AM

N-Rufus's Mare
C-George Calhoun
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 F-8 G-8 a-8 c-8 a-4 G-8_F-8 D-8 D-8 D-4 F-8_D-8 C-8 C-8 c-4 b%8_G-8 a-8 c-8 d-8 R-4 a-8_d-8
L- Now, poor Ru-fus he has come to town. No won-der that he is cast down. It's
H-
M-1d-8 e-8 d-4 d-4
L-"the first time in
B-5/8
H-
M-3d-0 c-0 a-8 F-4 G-8 a-8 c-8 a-8 G-8_F-8 D-8 D-8 D-5
L-man-y's the day that he has walked here all the way.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 12:20 PM

N-I'm a Decent Boy from Ireland
C-from singing of Charlie Chamberlin
A-
T-
S-92
K-C
B-3/4
F-Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
H-
M-5R-2 E-8 F-8 G-2 G-4 F-2 E-4 D-4 C-2_C-2 C-8_D-8
L-I'm a de-cent boy from Ire-land, I've
H-
M-5E-2 C-4 A-2 C-4 @-3_@-2 C-4 C-2 D-4
L-claimed it as my home Quite sor-ry
H-
M-5C-2 A-4 @-4 C-2 C-2 E-8 F-8 G-2 G-4 G-8_F-5 E-4
L-for to tell you, boys, I was forced from it to
H-
M-5D-3_D-2 E-8_F-8 G-2 G-4 F-2 E-4 D-4 C-2_
L-roam. Brought up by hon-est par-ents
H-
M-5C-2 D-4 E-8_E-5 C-4 A-4_C-4 C-4 @-3_@-2 C-4
L-_ who loved their Pad-dy dear, And
H-
M-5C-2 D-4 C-2 A-4 @-4_C-2 C-2 E-8 F-8 G-2 F-4
L-of-ten by the fire-side they would whis-per
H-
M-3A-2 B-4 C-3_C-2 R-4
L-"in my ear:


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 01:12 PM

N-The Famous Light Brigade
C-from the singing of Patrick Tayluer
A-
T-
S-69
K-C
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-8R-5 G-8 G-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 D-0 C-9 R-8 G-8 c-0 c-9 b-9 a-0 C-4 R-8 G-8 a-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 a-0 G-9 R-8 E-8 E-0 G-9 F-8 E-8
L-It was a fa-mous sto-ry, pro-claim it far and wide, And let you child-ren's child-ren re-ech-o it with
H-
M-4D-4 R-0 E-0 E-8 E-8 G-0 G-0_G-8 E-8 D-8 C-8 R-8 E-8 E-8 G-8 G-8 a-8
L-pride; When old Car-di-gan, the fear-less, his nam im-mor-tal
B-3/4
H-
M-1G-4_G-8 G-0 G-0 G-4
L-made, when he charged
B-2/4
H-
M-4c-8 c-8 b-8 a-8 G-0 E-9_E-8 D-0 C-0 E-0 D-9 C-8 B-8 C-2
L-through that Roosh-ian val-ley, with his fam-ous Light Brig-ade.


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Subject: CORRECTION - the Dying Ranger
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 01:18 PM

DT songfile dyrangr
known in the south as Dying Ranger in Doerflinger as The Dying Soldier

DT file missing the first verse:

The sun was sinking in the west and fell in ling'ring rays
Through the branches of a forest wher a wounded soldier lay.
On the banks of the Potomac /neath the southron sultry sky,
Far from his loved New England home, they've laid him down to die.

tune in DT


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Subject: ADD:Byrontown
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 02:41 PM

BYRONTOWN
(from the singing of Jerry Hanley via the singing of Jared MacLean)
(collected by Louise Manny)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp260-262)

Oh, in By-ron-town of high re-nown,
That's where I do be-long,
And to speak my mind on wo-men-kind,
Now, I've com-posed a song.
And I hope with me you'll all a-gree,
Mind, what I say is true,
And young la-dies gay I will be-tray,
And give them all thier due.

Now the first of all, there's big and small,
As you may understand;
The tall and slim, the thick and thin,
All inour glorious land.
The black and white, they lace up tieght
Our young men to beguile.
There's the young and ould, the hot and cold,
There's every shade and style.

Now, these girls you'll meet upon the street,
the seem so blithe and gay,
With a form and face that would disgrace
The blooming flowers in May.
And a ruby lip some nice young slip
The seem so gay and shy;
And they'll kindly speak and look so meek
Saying; I'm Mother's pride and joy.

Now, such thoughts as these, they do me please,
And set my heart on fire.
To be some man's wife, yes, all through life,
It is their whole desire.
But love has blinded all mankind,
From the days of Adam down,
so that's the way in the State of Maine,
Likewise in Byrontown.

Oh, it's now you know, to a dance they'll go,
Next day they can scarcely crawl,
And if our young men could see them then,
In love they'd never fall.
Like a lousy pup, they're all used up,
Their sex they do degrade;
They should lead their life as no man's wife,
But die a poor old maid.

They rise at nine, or dinner time
To get their morning meal.
Oh, Mother dear, I feel so queer.
You don't know how I feel!
My head does ache, it will surelye break;
My back it pains again.
I wished last night I was in my grave,
And the grass growing over me green!

But they'll marry a man, that's if they can,
And to keeping house they'll go.
They'll pile on style, yes, all the while,
Let the wages be high or low.
A loaf or cake they cannot bake;
You would laugh to see their pies,
They'd declare the flour was old and sour,
And the dough it would not rise.

It's an organ grand you must pursue,
All for your lady bright,
And a sewing machine to hem and seam
To keep her hands so white.
And a great big hat, sure she'll sport that,
No matter what you say,
And a brand new shawl she'll have next fall,
When you your debts can't pay.


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Subject: ADD: The Anchor's Aweigh
From: MMario
Date: 17 Jan 03 - 01:12 PM

THE ANCHOR'S AWEIGH
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflilnger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p167)

Oh the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh,
Fare-well, fare you well, my own true love


At last we part-ed on the shore,
as the tears rolled gent-ly from her eyes.
Must you leave me now, she did say,
That I face this all a-lone?

Oh the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh,
Fare-well, fare you well, my own true love


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 17 Jan 03 - 02:42 PM

N-The Anchor's Aweigh
C-
A-
T-
S-72
K-F
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-5 C-4 C-8 F-5 F-4 F-8 F-5 R-4 F-0_a-0 c-5 c-4 c-8 a-5 R-8 a-8_c-8
L-Oh, the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh, Fare-
H-
M-4d-5 d-8_b-8 G-8 F-8_D-4_C-4 D-8 a-5 G-4_F-8 F-5 R-4 C-8
L-well, fare you well, my own true love. At
B-4/4
H-
M-1B-5 F-8 a-0_G-0 F-8 D-8 F-8
L-last we part-ed on the
B-3/4
H-
M-4C-4 R-8 C-0 C-0 F-8 a-8 c-5 c-8 d-0_b-0 G-8 E-2 R-8 C-8 F-5 F-8 d-8 c-8
L-shore, As the tears rolled gent-ly from her eyes. Must you go leave me
H-
M-2c-8 b%0 b%0 b&5 G-0 G-0 T34aa-8_d-8 c-8_c-4 T34ab%8_a-8 b-8
L-now, she did say, That I x face this x all a-
B-6/8
H-
M-5c-5 R-8 C-8 C-8 F-5 F-4 F-8 F-5 R-4 F-0_a-0 c-5 c-8_a-8 a-8 a-5 R-8 a-8_c-8
L-lone? Oh, the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh, Fare-
H-
M-4d-5 d-8_b-8 G-8 F-8_D-4_C-4 D-8 a-5 G-4_F-8 F-5 R-5
L-well, fare you well, my own true love.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 10:43 AM

N-Byrontown
C-
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-4/4
F-
H-
M-4R-3 F-9 G-0 a-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-4 G-4 c-8_G-8 G-8 R-8 C-4 F-4 G-8_F-8 D-5 D-8
L-Oh, in By-ron-town of high re-known, That's where I do be-
H-
M-4D-2 R-4 D-9 E-0 F-4 F-4 F-8 R-8 a-0_c-9 c-0 c-5_c-0 a-8 R-8 c-4 d-4 c-8_a-8 F-4 G-4
L-long. And to speak my mind on wom-en-kind, Now, I've com-posed a
H-
M-4a-2 R-4 D-9 E-0 F-4 F-4 F-4 a-0_c-9 c-4 c-8_a-8 a-8 R-8 c-4 d-4 c-0_a-9 F-4 G-4
L-song. And I hope with me you'll all a-gree, Mind, what I say is
H-
M-4a-4 R-4 R-4 F-9 G-0 a-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-4 a-8 R-8 C-4 F-4 G-0_F-8 R-0 D-5 D-8
L-true. And young la-dies gay I will be-tray, and give them all their
H-
M-1D-4 R-3
L-due.


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Subject: ADD:Call John the Boatman
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 10:53 AM

CALL JOHN THE BOATMAN
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p 173)

Call John the boat-man, call, call a-gain.
For loud roars the remp-est and fast falls the rain.
John-ny is a good man, he sleeps so ver-y sound,
His oars are at rest and his boat is a-ground
Red rolls the riv-er, so ra-pid and so deep;
Well the loud-er you call him, the fast-er he'll sleep!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 11:09 AM

N-Call John The Boatman
C-
A-
T-
S-138
K-D
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5G-5 G-4 G-8 b-5 G-5 G-5 F-4 E-8 F-5 R-4 F-8 G-5 b-4 b-8
L-Call John the boat-man, call, call a-gain, For loud roars the
H-
M-5b-5 E-4 F-8 G-5 F-4 F-8 E-5 R-5 E-4 E-8 E-4 E-8 E-5 E-4 E-8
L-tem-pest and fast falls the rain. John-ny is a good man, he
H-
M-5E-4 E-8 D-4 C-8 B-5 R-4 B-8 E-5 E-4 E-8 E-5 E-4 E-8 E-5 D-4 C-8
L-sleeps so ve-ry sound, His oars are at rest and his boat is a-
H-
M-5B-5 R-5 b-5 b-4 a-8 G-5 E-4 E-8 b-4 b-8 b-4 c-8 d-3
L-ground. Red rolls the riv-er, so rap-id and so deep
H-
M-5R-5 d-4 d-8 e-5 G-4 a-8 G-5 b-4 b-8 b-5 a-4 a-8 G-5 R-5
L-Well the loud-er you call him, the fast-er he'll sleep!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 04:31 PM

That's most of it - I've shipped a "new" index off to Joe - that has links for most of the songs - either here in this thread or the DT - a few in the forum.

There are a VERY few with no link - I should be able to get to them sooner or later; but I am *way* behind on stuff I've promised Philippa, and Bronson, and...


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 07 Feb 03 - 09:17 AM

I've started putting the midi's up on the Mudcat Midi page


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 16 Oct 03 - 01:24 PM

tune posted for "We'll have another drink before the boat shoves off" in another thread - see link above.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: EBarnacle1
Date: 16 Oct 03 - 04:30 PM

re: Anything attributed to Larry Gorman can be expanded upon by contacting Sandy Ives (died 2009) at the University of Maine, Orono. He established the department of folklore and department survives.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Dec 06 - 05:50 PM

A version of "Poor Old Man," collected by P. A. Hutchison in the late 1800's has been posted in 97546: Old Hoss
It is not combined with the 'floated in' "round Cape Horn" verses.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Charley Noble
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 11:47 AM

It's curious that no work songs have been collected related to loading or unloading lumber aboard the ships. This was very hard work, calling for a team effort, threading the larger beams through the bow or stern ports.

The only thing I've turned up is a poem by C. Fox Smith, appropriately titled "Lumber", which commemorates the experience as she observed it many times in Victoria, British Columbia, in the early 1900's. Here's her poem:

Words by Cicely Fox Smith ©
In ROVINGS, Elkin Mathews, London, UK, © 1921, pp. 33-34.

LUMBER

If I'd got to choose alone
One of all the freights I've known –
All my cargoes live and dead,
Bacon pigs and pigs of lead,
Cattle, copra, rice and rails,
Pilgrims, coolies, nitrates, nails,
Lima beans and China teas –
What do you think my pick would be?

If I'd got to name the best –
Take just one and leave the rest
Out of all the ports I've known –
Coral beaches white as bone,
All the hot lands and the cold,
Nights of stars and moons like gold,
Tropic smells and Spanish wine,
Whispering palm and singing pine,
All the isles of all the sea –
Where do you think I'd want to be?

Loading lumber long ago
In a ship I used to know,
With the bow-ports open wide
In her stained and rusted side,
And the saws a-screaming shrill
At the Steveston lumber-mill;
Where the Fraser floods and flows
Green and cold with melting snows,
And the tow-boats' wailing din,
As the booms come crawling in,
Fills the echoing creeks with sound,
And there's sawdust all around,
Deep and soft like drifted snow;
Nowhere much a man can go,
Nothing much to see or do,
Mouldiest burg you ever knew…

But I'd give the years between –
All I've done and all I've seen,
All the fooling and the fun,
All the chances lost and won,
All the good times and the bad,
All the memories sweet and sad,
Far and near, by shore and sea,
I would give them all to be
Loading lumber years ago
With the lads I used to know –

Loading lumber all day long
Stacks of scented deals among –
Loading lumber at the mill
Till the screaming saws were still,
And the rose-red sunset died
From the mountains and the tide,
And the night brought out its stars,
And the wind's song in the spars
Of that ship I used to know –
Loading lumber, long ago.

Notes: Cicely Fox Smith was based in Victoria, British Columbia, for much of the time that she was on the West Coast of Canada, roughly 1904 to 1913. She describes in vivid detail her experience there walking the docks, watching the sunsets, admiring the ships, listening to the yarns of ship-keepers and other sailors, and nosing around the waterfront. The Village of Steveston is located in Richmond, BC, adjacent to Vancouver where she likely visited. Curiously, there is no record of a "Steveston Mill" in Steveston Village. There were an abundance of Salmon canneries but apparently no lumber mill. However, there was a major railhead for shipping out lumber, and maybe that was the source of the poet's apparent confusion.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: shipcmo
Date: 07 Mar 11 - 07:11 AM

It appears that the program "MusicEase" will accomodate MMario's "Songwriter" notation.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 May 11 - 04:39 PM

shipcmo sent me a pack of MIDI files, converted from the SongWright files MMario posted above. You'll note that MMario has posted links to a number of MIDI files above, so some of these may be duplicates of tunes MMario has already posted. Most seem to be at least somewhat different from the MMario MMidis. Here they are, all together.
Thanks, shipcmo.
-Joe-


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