Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesonny

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Question about Byker Hill

DigiTrad:
BYKER HILL


Related threads:
(origins) Byker Hill: background info anyone? (142)
Elsie Marley & Byker Hill revisited (2) (closed)
Help What is Bumble? (Byker Hill) (33)
Lyr Add: Byker Hill (9) (closed)
Lyr Add: Biker Bill & Walter Shaw (9)


Chanteyranger 06 Apr 03 - 10:11 PM
Malcolm Douglas 06 Apr 03 - 10:12 PM
michaelr 06 Apr 03 - 10:57 PM
Malcolm Douglas 06 Apr 03 - 11:16 PM
GUEST,Jon 06 Apr 03 - 11:51 PM
GUEST,celtaddict 06 Apr 03 - 11:53 PM
Yorkshire Tony 07 Apr 03 - 02:26 AM
Chanteyranger 07 Apr 03 - 03:22 AM
DMcG 07 Apr 03 - 05:33 AM
Pied Piper 07 Apr 03 - 06:44 AM
GUEST,Mr Red (having designed weighning machines) 07 Apr 03 - 06:46 AM
GUEST,Jon 07 Apr 03 - 07:03 AM
GUEST,Jon 07 Apr 03 - 07:22 AM
RiGGy 07 Apr 03 - 08:42 AM
belfast 07 Apr 03 - 09:14 AM
GUEST,Peter from Essex 07 Apr 03 - 12:33 PM
Schantieman 07 Apr 03 - 12:57 PM
Schantieman 07 Apr 03 - 01:00 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 07 Apr 03 - 01:11 PM
nutty 07 Apr 03 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,Peter from Essex 07 Apr 03 - 02:37 PM
Ed. 07 Apr 03 - 03:14 PM
Malcolm Douglas 07 Apr 03 - 03:21 PM
Celtaddict 07 Apr 03 - 04:37 PM
GUEST,Peter from Essex 07 Apr 03 - 05:18 PM
TheBigPinkLad 07 Apr 03 - 06:42 PM
toadfrog 07 Apr 03 - 11:32 PM
Chanteyranger 08 Apr 03 - 01:12 AM
greg stephens 08 Apr 03 - 08:39 AM
GUEST,alice newton 01 Aug 05 - 08:17 AM
Ned Ludd 01 Aug 05 - 07:07 PM
GUEST,Fullerton 02 Aug 05 - 04:10 AM
Mr Happy 05 Oct 05 - 12:49 PM
Mr Happy 05 Oct 05 - 12:59 PM
Mr Happy 09 Oct 05 - 06:01 AM
Shields Folk 09 Oct 05 - 08:55 AM
yrlancslad 09 Oct 05 - 09:17 PM
Terry K 10 Oct 05 - 02:27 PM
Mr Happy 18 Oct 05 - 09:58 AM
Mr Happy 18 Oct 05 - 10:00 AM
TheBigPinkLad 18 Oct 05 - 12:31 PM
Mr Happy 23 Sep 07 - 10:12 AM
GUEST,Young Hunting 23 Sep 07 - 02:53 PM
Kampervan 24 Sep 07 - 08:10 AM
GUEST,Keinstein 24 Sep 07 - 09:05 AM
webby 24 Sep 07 - 09:41 AM
Greg B 24 Sep 07 - 02:25 PM
Snuffy 25 Sep 07 - 08:33 AM
Greg B 25 Sep 07 - 10:12 AM
GUEST 04 Sep 08 - 05:58 PM
Mr Happy 08 Mar 09 - 12:01 PM
Jack Blandiver 08 Mar 09 - 12:34 PM
Mr Happy 08 Mar 09 - 12:47 PM
Jack Blandiver 08 Mar 09 - 12:50 PM
Mr Happy 08 Mar 09 - 12:56 PM
Jack Blandiver 08 Mar 09 - 03:28 PM
GUEST,Ebor_fiddler 08 Mar 09 - 08:36 PM
Gurney 09 Mar 09 - 12:05 AM
Mr Happy 10 Mar 09 - 08:12 AM
GUEST,Riggy 10 Mar 09 - 05:44 PM
GUEST,Rifka 24 Feb 10 - 02:42 AM
GUEST,Maurice 30 Mar 11 - 11:03 AM
Mr Happy 25 Apr 13 - 10:49 AM
GUEST 25 Apr 13 - 11:17 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: Question about Byker Hill
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 10:11 PM

In the song Byker Hill, the first verse goes "If I had another penny, I would have another gill." What is a gill, and is it pronounced as in a fish gill, or as in "Jill." I've heard it pronounced both ways by different singers.Thanks. I just want to know what I'm singing about! :-).

Chanteyranger


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 10:12 PM

Gill, pronounced Jill.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: michaelr
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 10:57 PM

Hi Peter -- as I understand it, a gill is an archaic liquid measure equal to about one quarter of a pint.
I first came across it in the song "Rare's Hill" which you will find on the Greenhouse CD "I Lie Awake".


And when we got to Rare's Hill the laddie said to me
We can't go home tonight, my dear, it's far too late, you see
But the night is warm and in my pooch I have another gill
And we can lie down here content at the back of Rare's Hill

And then he poured a nip apiece to quiet all alarm
When I awoke in the morning we were locked in each other's arms
He handed me the bottle, another glass to fill
And I drank his health and store of wealth at the back of Rare's Hill


Cheers,
Michael


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 11:16 PM

Hardly archaic; (fractions of) a gill are still the standard measure for spirits in the UK. Because of wartime legislation of nearly a century ago, however, the standard spirit measure in England is, to my family's lasting regret (we live in England now) significantly smaller than the Scottish standard.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 11:51 PM

I'm not sure you are right there Malcolm. 1/6th gill (or 1/24 pint) seemed to be the standard "single" measure in England and Wales but I think that this is one area that did become metric.

Wherever I go, spirit is measured as 25ml (or double/ 50ml) which I think is larger than the old 1/6 measure. The only exception I can think of is a pub that has, within the last month, upped the measures to 35ml.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,celtaddict
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 11:53 PM

The "gill" unit of measure also is prominent in "The Barley Mow" and in the more recent "A Bottle of the Best." I am not at home to check, but think "Best" might be by Andy M. Stewart; Ed Miller sings it and it has a line that "If you spill a gill, you know I will, I'll drink it off the floor."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Yorkshire Tony
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 02:26 AM

I remember as a child my grandmother referring to a half pint as a gill, as distinct from the official gill which is a quarter pint. So there appears to have been some regional variation.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 03:22 AM

Thank you all. That answers it. Very much appreciated.

Chanteyranger


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: DMcG
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 05:33 AM

Maybe I'm showing my age too much, but I remember chanting in my primary class in 1959:

Four gills, one pint,
Two pints, one quart,
Four quarts, one gallon,
Eight pints, one gallon.
Two gallons, one peck,
Four pecks, one bushel,
Eight bushels, one quarter.

(Who says you did learn binary arithmetic in those days?)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Pied Piper
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 06:44 AM

I think a spirits were served in 1/6 of a gill not 1/5 (Scotland), which neer as damn it is 25ml.

PP


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Mr Red (having designed weighning machines)
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 06:46 AM

The gill is still a legal measure and FWIW it is illegal to sell overmeasure in English (and Welsh) pubs because of the drink drive laws. Dunno about Scotland. When I worked at W&T Avery we discussed weighing beer at the pump a means of dispensing correct measure and gave-up because of having to measure temperature and calculating (without embedded chips at the time). But it would have solved the "pint with or without froth" argument. If you can prove the froth makes the measure up to one pint there is no argument. If you can't the liquid has to reach the measuring line.

Breweries have forgotten the legal battles that have ensued over the years on three occasions in my lifetime. Anyone brave enough to argue with the landlord? With cider some just serve short measure and dare you to say anything.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 07:03 AM

Just tried the maths.

1/6 of a gill comes out around 23.67ml so we got 5.6% extra free where pubs moved over to metric ;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 07:22 AM

Just wondering, following on from Mr Red's comments. Wouldn't the density of beer decrease with a rise in temperature? Perhaps by selling beer very cold, we could actually be getting more of the product? Mind you, perhaps if they did sell some lagers warm enough to taste, people may realise how bad it is.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: RiGGy
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 08:42 AM

Bottle o' the Best
was masterfully written by newsman, Jack Foley

Riggy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: belfast
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 09:14 AM

The spirit measure in Ireland (both north and south) is also larger than that in England - 35ml, which is just less that a quarter of a gill, I think.

Some years ago I was with a friend in a London pub. She ordered a whiskey and, when it arrived, looked with some despair at the glass. "Where I come from," she informed the barman "that would be called a dirty glass."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Peter from Essex
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 12:33 PM

Spirits are now sold in metric measures. A gill is still a legal measure for beer although I have never heard of it being used. From context most dialect usage seems to refer to a larger measure than a quarter pint.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Schantieman
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 12:57 PM

In the song The Barley Mow, part of the chorus (well, it's mostly chorus, really) goes:

Gallon
Half gallon
Pint pot
Half pint
Gill pot
Half gill
Nipperkin and the brown bowl...

...which seems to confirm it as 1/4 pint - which is what I learned at school, too!

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Schantieman
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:00 PM

...And why does Martin Carthy sing a different tune from everyone else?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:11 PM

.... 'cos he was full to the gills at the time.....?

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: nutty
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:24 PM

I have a recording of Martin and Norma singing BIKER BILL AND WALTER SHAW.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Peter from Essex
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 02:37 PM

I know of at least three different tunes. I can't remember what Martin sings, is it different from all of them?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Ed.
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 03:14 PM

Peter,

You'd have to let us know which three tunes you do know, before we could answer that!

From the notes to Martin Carthy's Byker Hill album:

"The tune of Byker Hill sung here is not the one sung traditionally. It is a Northumbrian dance tune in 9/8, unusual in that instead of being divided into three threes as are most other 9/8 tunes, it is divided in three twos and one three and appropriately called The Drunken Piper.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 03:21 PM

For more on the tunes, see this previous discussion: Byker Hill: background info anyone?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Celtaddict
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 04:37 PM

Thanks, Riggy. I can recognize the voice I hear a song in, mentally, but not who wrote it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Peter from Essex
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 05:18 PM

Ed - Three tunes that I have heard:

1. as sung by Johnny Handle (and Pete Coe)
2. Off She Goes
3. as sung by Young Tradition


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 06:42 PM

The latest version (and a cracker to boot!) I have is performed by local boy Brian Johnson (of AC/DC) on the Northumbria Anthology (20 CDs of traditional music from the North East of England) It's an expensive collection at 150 quid, but worth it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: toadfrog
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 11:32 PM

The way I heard was:
2 ounces=1 jack
2 jacks =1 gill
2 gills= 1 cup
2 cups = 1 pint, etc.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 01:12 AM

Very interesting discussion! The two versions I've heard are from The NexTradition (Alison Kelley and Ken Schatz), and the Mudcat's own Dave Swan.

"Biker Bill and Walter Shaw." Good stuff, nutty!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: greg stephens
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 08:39 AM

The gill is technically a quarter pint, but the word is still in general use as a euphemism for a considerably larger quantity of liquid. If I run into someone and say "Do you fancy a gill, let's go into the George", it would be very surprising if we only drank a quarter of a pint. This is analogous to the phrase "how about a quick half"...which we all know is neither quick nor a half.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,alice newton
Date: 01 Aug 05 - 08:17 AM

There were two pits in Walker The Ann Pit on Mitchell Street where my grandfather was kiled March 8th 1908 The Jane pit that was adjacent where the Jubilee club stands now


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Ned Ludd
Date: 01 Aug 05 - 07:07 PM

For the record, in Outlane near Huddersfield where I was allowed to grow, we referred to a gill of milk at our infants school, which was half a pint and my Dad also used the term for a half of beer and went out for a 'couple of gills' meaning of course, about eight pints!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Fullerton
Date: 02 Aug 05 - 04:10 AM

The tune used in Mr. Carthy's version is, I believe, based on on the tune Dorrington Lads.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 05 Oct 05 - 12:49 PM

The DT version seems to be lacking a verse.

Its one that goes

??? gets half a penny,
??? gets half a crown
??? gets five & sixpence
Just for riding up & down.


Anyone know it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 05 Oct 05 - 12:59 PM

please ignore last q.

i just found variations of missing verse in closed thread.

also found variation of the 'pig' verse:

Geordie Thompson had a pig
And he hit it with a shovel and it danced a jig
All the way to Byker Hill
It danced the Elsie Marley.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 09 Oct 05 - 06:01 AM

anyone know who wrote the song?

& when?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Shields Folk
Date: 09 Oct 05 - 08:55 AM

the coal cutter gets half a penny,
the deputy gets half a crown
the overman gets five & sixpence
Just for riding up & down


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: yrlancslad
Date: 09 Oct 05 - 09:17 PM

Officially in the UK a gill (pronounced "jill")is a quarter of a pint but growing up in Lancashire I never heard it referred to as anything other than a half pint(always in the pub) as in," 'ere gie us a gill luv"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Terry K
Date: 10 Oct 05 - 02:27 PM

My A L Lloyd version curiously calls it "Walker Shore and Byker Hill" on both the LP sleeve and on the LP itself, but even more curiously he sings it as "Walker Hill and Byker Shore".

He wrote his own sleeve notes of course and doesn't credit a writer, but says that

"Versions .... were published as long ago as 1812".

(It may not have made the charts as there was some competition at the time).

cheers, Terry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 18 Oct 05 - 09:58 AM

'but even more curiously he sings it as "Walker Hill and Byker Shore". '


very odd- i wonder what he'd been drinking??


or was it mish eard lyrics?


'walk the hill then bike ashore' perhaps?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 18 Oct 05 - 10:00 AM

sounds sort of 'kipperish'!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 18 Oct 05 - 12:31 PM

I remember a chant from the footie back in the early 70s at St. James' Park when one section of the crowd in the Leazes end shouted "Byker!" and another section replied with "Walker!"

Was anyone a member of(or even rememberer of) the Leazes End Choir?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 23 Sep 07 - 10:12 AM

Again, different from the DT version, I've heard the 'Geordie Charlton' verse sung as:


Geordie Charlton, he had a pig.
He hit it with a shovel and it danced a jig.
All the way to Bullmanfs Rig.
To the tune of Elsie Marley.

also he's sometimes 'Geordie Thompson'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Young Hunting
Date: 23 Sep 07 - 02:53 PM

GUEST,Jon

Wouldn't the density of beer decrease with a rise in temperature? Perhaps by selling beer very cold, we could actually be getting more of the product?

There was a book some years ago called something like 100 Ways of Saving Petrol. One of those ways was - always buy your petrol when it is cold in the pump because otherwise it will be expanded in the measure and you will be paying for less actual petrol.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Kampervan
Date: 24 Sep 07 - 08:10 AM

Byker Hill - introduced by The Wlsons as the 'pig-beating shanty'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Keinstein
Date: 24 Sep 07 - 09:05 AM

Volume expansivity of water is 2.1e-4/K, that of alcohol about 1e-3/K. So assume that beer is a little above water- say 2.5e-4/k. "Cold" beer won't be freezing, say it's 5C, and British "warm" beer is served a little below room temperature- say 15C. To the temperature difference is about 10 degrees. The volume expansion will be 2.5e-3 or a quarter of 1%, about 1.5ml in a (UK) pint glass. Just enough to drown a mosquito.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: webby
Date: 24 Sep 07 - 09:41 AM

re Barley Mow I always understood it to be
The Gallon
The Half gallon
Quart-pot
Pint-pot
Half-pint
Gill-pot
Half a gill
Quarter gill
Nipikin and a dram more   Heres good luck etc

re Byker I was taught
The pitman he gets one and six
The Deputy gets half a crown
The Overman gets four and six
And all for walkin up and down

and after working many years down the pits in Warwickshire four and
six was about four bob more than most of them were worth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Greg B
Date: 24 Sep 07 - 02:25 PM

When I first heard Byker Hill, I had a mondegreen experience,
hearing it as 'Bike Her Hill and Walk Her Shore,' which made
no bloody sense at all, but what the hell...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Snuffy
Date: 25 Sep 07 - 08:33 AM

Then I'll dance down that Walker Shore
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.

Can't have been unintentional, can it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Greg B
Date: 25 Sep 07 - 10:12 AM

That explains the chap with the bicycle riding down
the gang-plank.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Sep 08 - 05:58 PM

Less of the archaic - I learned gills at school, along with rods, poles, perches, acres, ounces, pounds, feet yards, inches - ALONGSIDE the meter, centimeter and all that stuff.

And of course corespondents are correct - just go into any British pub and look at the optics!

Cheers, Norman


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 12:01 PM

A variation verse is

Poor coal cutter gets a shilling
Deputy gets half a crown
Overman gets five and sixpence
Just for riding up and down




Here's a choir who're singing it with a hard G

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnQorEl6uzk


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 12:34 PM

Here's a choir who're singing it with a hard G

That's truly awful.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 12:47 PM

Well they're furriners - p'raps they don't know how to pronounce it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 12:50 PM

I'm not talking about the pronunciation.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 12:56 PM

Tee-Hee!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 03:28 PM

Hell, listen to me! Sniffing at an American choir for having the audacity to sing one of my native songs! For shame! So - sing on ye merry songsters & Glee-men of Michigan; I'm sure there's a drop of the old blood somewhere in there...

Here's my version: Sedayne - Byker Hill (Alpha)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Ebor_fiddler
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 08:36 PM

"You can bike from Byker to Walker, but you've got to walk from Walker to Byker" (local saying, explaining the geography to strangers).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Gurney
Date: 09 Mar 09 - 12:05 AM

Snuffy, it is   'I'll dance on down that walk-ashore, and sail the grey funnel line no more.'
Gang-plank. I asked Cyril. Long time ago.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 10 Mar 09 - 08:12 AM

As a mondegreen, I've often heard it as
'I'll dance on down and walk ashore, and sail the grey funnel line no more.'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Riggy
Date: 10 Mar 09 - 05:44 PM

Got to actually live in Byker in late '71 with Ray Tremble and his mum. He told me that Walker was actually an under-sea coal pit that ran out from a shaft on the land. Hence "shore". But couldn't have been near Byker Hill, as that was quite a l-o-n-g ways from the seashore. Still tryin' to figger it out ... Riggy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Rifka
Date: 24 Feb 10 - 02:42 AM

I lived on Welbeck Road in Walker, across from St. Anthony's Church in the late 80s. Behind the church was a desolate and newish parade of shops (very grim indeed).   Byker was by then a housing development up the road, back towards Newcastle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST,Maurice
Date: 30 Mar 11 - 11:03 AM

Everyone seems to sing diferent words 9silightly) to the ones I learned as a very young boy in the late 1950s.
The bit that anoys me is "all the way to Walker Shore" which should be "All the way to Duncan's rigg" real place and rhymes with pig.
And it's "scad" it with a shovel not hit it.

Byker Hill

If I had another penny
I would have another gill
I would have the piper play
The bonny lass of Byker Hill

Ch    Byker Hill and Walker Shore,
        Collier lads for ever more,
        Byker Hill and Walker Shore,
        Collier lads for ever more

When I first came to the dirt
I had no breeks nor no pitshirt
Now I've gotten two or three
Why Walker Pit's done well by me

The pitman and the keelman trim
They drink bumble made from gin
Then to dance they do begin
To the tune of Elsie Marley

The poor coal cutter gets a shillin'
the deputy gets half a crown
The owerman gets five and sixpence,
just for riding up and down

Geordie Charlton, he had a pig
He scad it with a shovel and it danced a jig
All the way to Duncan's rig
To the tune of Elsie Marley -


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: Mr Happy
Date: 25 Apr 13 - 10:49 AM

Tune borrowed?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_w5JlDn9WCw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Question about Byker Hill
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Apr 13 - 11:17 AM

In Manchester my grandad always referred to a half pint of beer as a gill.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 24 June 6:55 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.