Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeetta

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself

In Mudcat MIDIs:
Let Each Man Learn to Know Himslef (Mormon Hymn)


Brack& 30 Jul 98 - 08:34 PM
Ireland O'Reilly 31 Jul 98 - 12:22 PM
Brakn 27 Apr 99 - 02:07 PM
Peter T. 27 Apr 99 - 03:09 PM
Jon W. 27 Apr 99 - 04:57 PM
Jon W. 28 Apr 99 - 10:58 AM
Peter T. 28 Apr 99 - 11:12 AM
Jon W. 28 Apr 99 - 12:49 PM
Joe Offer 28 Apr 99 - 01:52 PM
Peter T. 28 Apr 99 - 02:03 PM
Jon W. 28 Apr 99 - 03:51 PM
Peter T. 28 Apr 99 - 04:20 PM
GUEST,Kerry C. 12 Sep 04 - 03:20 AM
GUEST,Al 21 Sep 08 - 12:54 PM
GUEST,Jose Herazo 28 Sep 08 - 03:53 PM
GUEST,Dallin 17 Oct 08 - 06:56 PM
GUEST,aR 08 Dec 10 - 01:56 PM
GUEST 06 Jul 11 - 02:18 AM
GUEST 28 Jul 12 - 02:11 AM
Joe Offer 28 Jul 12 - 02:23 AM
GUEST,Chris Shipley www.thebestadvantage.net 04 Nov 13 - 09:03 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:




Subject: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Brack&
Date: 30 Jul 98 - 08:34 PM

Can anyone give me information about this song? I don't know the air or who wrote it. My great grandmother used to sing it, and she's been dead since 1930. Apparently, the man who made it up was fond of drink and when under the influence got up to sing one night at a concert. The crowd started to snigger at him and he made this up while he stood there. So the story goes.
    Let each man learn to know himself,
    To gain that knowledge let him labour,
    Improve the failing in himself,
    That he condemns so in his neighbour,

    And in self judgement, if you find,
    Your deeds to others superior,
    To you, has providence been kind,
    As you should be to those inferior,

    And when you meet an erring one,
    Whose deeds to you are false and shameless,
    Consider, err you cast the stone,
    That you yourself are pure and blameless,

    Example sheds a genial ray,
    That oft times men are apt to borrow,
    So first improve yourself today,
    And then improve your friend tomorrow.

Any help??????
Regards Mick Bracken


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Ireland O'Reilly
Date: 31 Jul 98 - 12:22 PM

Can't offer any help, but I like the lyrics! :)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Brakn
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 02:07 PM

Last try.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Peter T.
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 03:09 PM

Dear Brakn, This may not be any help, but a Net search turns up this. The song seems to be a favourite of the Mormons (if these people are Mormons):
    (Compiled and written by David Kenison, Orem, Utah, dkenison@xmission.com)

    I want to reprint a poem that nearly sixty years ago was repeated to me in Idaho, or, rather, it was not repeated as a poem; it was sung as a song by the late Francis M. Lyman.

    It so happened that from Tooele I had to travel thirty-six miles to Salt Lake City and then on through Davis County, Weber County, and up to Brigham City, and then two and three-fourths days' journey west out to Oakley, to what was then a branch of the Grantsville Ward of the Tooele Stake of Zion over which I presided. (The first motion I made as an apostle was to present that whole country to the Box Elder Stake of Zion.) Now, when I was on that trip, Brother Lyman sang a song to me, and that very night I sat down and asked him to repeat it to me while I wrote it down, and the next day I learned it:

      Let each man learn to know himself;
      To gain that knowledge let him labor
      To improve those failings in himself
      Which he condemns so in his neighbor.

and so on. This is probably not much use -- but a gesture to let you know that no posting is completely unrecorded, and no hope... (I feel a song coming on).

Yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Jon W.
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 04:57 PM

I thought that was familiar. I believe it's in our Mormon hymnbook - there have been two editions in my lifetime, I'll take a look in them tonight. They will have the music also, which I will post if I find it. Meanwhile I can confirm that the terminology in Peter's post above is definitely Mormon. Francis M. Lyman was an apostle in the LDS (Mormon) Church at least as early as 1896.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: LET EACH MAN LEARN TO KNOW HIMSELF
From: Jon W.
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 10:58 AM

Success! I found this song in the older hymnbook, but it has been omitted from our more recent one. Unlike most songs in the book, this one has no indication of author or composer, which leads me to believe that it was passed on by oral tradition as the story above indicates. Here is the tune in ABC format, along with the words as they appear in the hymnbook - a few minor differences than above plus two additional half-verses (the second half of verses 1 & 2).
LET EACH MAN LEARN TO KNOW HIMSELF
Source: Hymns - Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Let each man learn to know himself;
To gain that knowledge let him labor,
Improve those feelings in himself
Which he condemns so in his neighbor.
How lenient our own faults we view,
And conscience's voice adeptly smother,
Yet, oh, how harshly we review
The selfsame failings in another!

(chorus)
Let each man learn to know himself;
To gain that knowledge let him labor,
Improve those failings in himself,
Which he condemns so in his neighbor.

And if you meet an erring one
Whose deeds are blameable and thoughtless
Consider, ere you cast the stone,
If you yourself are pure and faultless.
Oh, list to that small voice within,
Whose whisperings oft make men confounded,
And trumpet not another's sin;
You'd blush deep if your own were sounded.

And in self judgement if you find
Your deeds to others' are superior,
To you has Providence been kind,
As you should be to those inferior.
Example sheds a genial ray
Of light which men are apt to borrow,
So first improve yourself today
And then improve your friends tomorrow.


X:80
T:LET EACH MAN LEARN TO KNOW HIMSELF
S:Hymns - Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
M:C
K:F
L:1/4
Q:1/4=84
C|C F F3/2 G/2|A3/2 B/2 A C|A3/2 B/2 G/2 C3/2|
W: Let each man learn to know himself; To gain that knowledge
G3/2 A/2 G/2 F C/2|C F F3/2 G/2|A3/2 B/2 A C|
W: let him labor, Improve those feelings in himself Which
A3/2 B/2 G/2 C3/2|G3/2 A/2 G/2 F G/2|G E G c|
W: he condemns so in his neighbor. How lenient our own
=B3/2 A/2 F3/2 E/2|D F =B3/2 A/2|G D A/2 E
W: faults we view, And conscience's voice adeptly smother,
G/2|G E c3/2 G/2|=B3/2 A/2 G3/2 F/2|E/2D/2 E/2F/2 A3/2 G/2|
W: Yet, oh, how harshly we review The selfsame failings
G/2^F/2=F/2 D/2 D/2 C||C/2|C F F3/2 G/2|A3/2 B/2 A C|
W: In another! (chorus) Let each man learn to know himself; To
A3/2 B/2 G/2 C3/2|G3/2 A/2 G/2 F F/2|B3/2 A/2 G F|
W: gain that knowledge let him labor, Improve those failings
G A c/2=B/2_B/2 G/2 F C A3/2 B/2|A3/2 G/2 G/2 F3/2||
W: in himself, Which he condemns so in his neighbor.

W: 2:
W: And if you meet an erring one
W: Whose deeds are blameable and thoughtless
W: Consider, ere you cast the stone,
W: If you yourself are pure and faultless.
W: Oh, list to that small voice within,
W: Whose whisperings oft make men confounded,
W: And trumpet not another's sin;
W: You'd blush deep if your own were sounded.

W: 3:
W: And in self judgement if you find
W: Your deeds to others' are superior,
W: To you has Providence been kind,
W: As you should be to those inferior.
W: Example sheds a genial ray
W: Of light which men are apt to borrow,
W: So first improve yourself today
W: And then improve your friends tomorrow.


To play or display ABC tunes, try concertina.net

Click to play


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Peter T.
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 11:12 AM

Dear Jon, It is intriguing that a hymnbook would contain such an almost secular song (I know it mentions providence and sin, but the whole style is more Reader's Digest than "God oriented"). Is this typical of Mormon hymns? (I know almost nothing about the Mormons except the main outlines of the 19th century story).

Yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Jon W.
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 12:49 PM

Peter, I had thought about mentioning the lack of religious doctrine in the hymn earlier. I wouldn't say it is typical of our hymns, which range from the deeply religious to the "wisdom literature" such as this one. This song has never been popular in my lifetime - I doubt I've heard it in church more than two or three times in 40 years. There are a few others that are similar - "Should You Feel Inclined to Censure" is almost identical in tone to this, and "Truth Reflects Upon Our Senses" is also, but more scriptural, being based on some parts of the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 5-7). "Truth Reflects" was written by Eliza R. Snow, an early Mormon poetess, plural wife of both Joseph Smith and (later, and probably in name only) Brigham Young, sister of the fifth church president Lorenzo Snow, and women's leader in the Church. It is sung to a common tune written by C.D. Tillman with the chorus "Blessed Saviour, thou wilt guide us, Till we reach that blissful shore..." This is much more well known in the Church today than the other two.

Another similar song is "School Thy Feelings" written by Charles W. Penrose, a Mormon Apostle from the early Utah period of church history. No mention of God, Jesus, or religion (other than one occurrence of the word "Gospel"). I suppose that these songs were more commonly sung during the period of isolation of the Church, where it served as the de facto civil government, financial, and educational establishment as well as the religious order of the territory of Utah and some surrounding Mormon communities.

The LDS Church is now nearly 170 years old, has over ten million members, more of whom are outside the U.S. than inside, is growing ever more rapidly all the time, and has confined itself almost exclusively to the religious side of life. So these types of "secular ethics" hymns are not so common anymore.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 01:52 PM

"Know thyself," a saying by the renowned philosopher A. Nonymous, is inscribed on the temple of Apollo at Delphi. In Greek, it's "Gnothi SeAuton" - if you'll excuse my clumsy transliteration. Plato attributes the saying to the Seven Wise Men, one of whom was undoubtedly named A. Nonymous.
And that's about all I can remember from two years of Greek class. I hope that's enough to make Mom proud.
-Joe Offer-
I was searching my feeble memory to recall the rest of the song Jon quoted above. Thank Greenhaus it's in the database - it's Life's Railway to Heaven.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Peter T.
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 02:03 PM

Dear Jon, Thanks. The things you learn mudcatting around. Here's another question: I know the Mormons have a soft spot for Indian tribes (due to the ancient history proposed in the Mormon tablets, etc.). Are there any pseudo-Indian songs or hyms in the tradition? Any references to the native tribes? Just curious.

Yours, Peter


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Jon W.
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 03:51 PM

There is a very popular Primary song (Primary being the organization of the Church for children up to age 11) called "Book of Mormon Stories" that has a pseudo-Indian tune and beat. Mormons use the generic term "Lamanite" for all American Indian (or Native American to be PC) peoples as well as Polynesians to a lesser degree. The term is taken from the Book of Mormon. So I'm not aware of any references to tribes by their proper names.

I think there were a few more Indian-oriented songs published by the Church as part of the Indian Seminary Program, which was a course of religious studies specifically for LDS Native American youth. This would have been in the '60s and maybe '70s.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: Peter T.
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 04:20 PM

Thanks, Jon.

Yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LET EACH MAN LEARN TO KNOW HIMSELF
From: GUEST,Kerry C.
Date: 12 Sep 04 - 03:20 AM

I was looking for some history and authenticity to this myself. In that search I have found your question. I had found this version quoted by Heber J. Grant, a Mormon Apostle in 1919 from where he got it except for a possible author at the bottom, I could find nothing much more about either. Most of this may be familiar, but interestingly different. I hope this helps your search.
    Let each man learn to know himself:
    To gain that knowledge, let him labor,
    Improve those failings in himself,
    Which he condemns so in his neighbor.
    How lenient our own faults we view,
    And conscience' voice adeptly smother;
    But oh! how harshly we review
    The self-same errors in another!

    And if you meet an erring one
    Whose deeds are blamable or thoughtless,
    Consider, ere you cast the stone,
    If you yourself be pure and faultless.
    Oh! list to that small voice within,
    Whose whisperings oft make men confounded,
    And trumpet not another's sin,
    You'd blush deep if your own were sounded.

    And in self-judgment, if you find
    Your deeds to others are superior;
    To you has Providence been kind,
    As you should be to those inferior;
    Example sheds a genial ray
    Of light, which men are apt to borrow;
    So first, improve yourself today,
    And then improve your friends tomorrow.

    Philip De La Mere.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Let each man learn to know himself??????
From: GUEST,Al
Date: 21 Sep 08 - 12:54 PM

How lenient our own faults we view
and conscience voice adeptly smother;
yet, oh, how harshly we review
the self same failings in another.

And if you meet an erring one
whose deeds are blamable and thoughtless,
consider, ere you cast the stone,
if you yourself are pure and faultless.

Oh, list to that small voice within,
whose whisperings oft make men confounded
and trumpet not another's sin,
you'd blush deep if your own were sounded.

And in self judgment if you find
your deeds to others are superior,
to you has Providence been kind,
as you should be to those inferior.

Example sheds a genial ray
of light which men are apt to borrow.
So first improve your self today
and then improve your friends tomorrow.

Let each man learn to know himself,
to gain that knowledge let him labour
to improve those failings in himself
which he condemns so in his neighbour.
------
On page 144 from a book first published in 1871

Title: Hermes Mercurius Trismegistus his Devine Pymander
-----
Edited by Pashal Beverly Randolph

Note: the Mormon hymn transposed the last four lines from the end to the beginning of the poem.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: GUEST,Jose Herazo
Date: 28 Sep 08 - 03:53 PM

Hi everuone, is there any way to get it in Spanish?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: GUEST,Dallin
Date: 17 Oct 08 - 06:56 PM

To say that this poem or song is not religiously based is not completely correct. The concept is losely based on a couple of verses from the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew in the New Testament.
Matthew 7:1-5
1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.
3 And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?
4 Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye?
5 Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: GUEST,aR
Date: 08 Dec 10 - 01:56 PM

From what I understand, this poem was written by Philip de la Mare, an early pioneer to Utah. His son, Thomas, wrote in 1943 that Philip wrote the poem while working as an blacksmithing apprentice at his home on the Isle of Jersey. Philip came to America in 1851-52, and settled in Tooele, Utah.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jul 11 - 02:18 AM

Yes, you are correct about Philip De La Mare writing the hymn "LET EACH MAN LEARN TO KNOW HIMSELF." He is my ancestor.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Jul 12 - 02:11 AM

26-05-1986 at 7:25am


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jul 12 - 02:23 AM

γνῶθι σεαυτόν (gnothi seauton - Know yourself) - one of the first of many aphorisms we had to memorize in Greek class....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Let Each Man Learn to Know Himself
From: GUEST,Chris Shipley www.thebestadvantage.net
Date: 04 Nov 13 - 09:03 PM

The poem which was later put to music was originally written by my great great grandfather in the Isle of Jersey while he walked several miles back and forth to work each day.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 26 October 1:57 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.