Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origin: Bay of Biscay-o + Neptune's Raging Fury

DigiTrad:
BAY OF FUNDY
GHOST OF WILLIE-O
THE BAY OF BISCAY-O


Related threads:
Help: Bay of Biscay - My Willie Sails (19)
Tune: Bay of Biscay (Tim Hart & Maddy Prior) (4)


Lesley N. 05 Jan 99 - 04:22 PM
Bruce O. 05 Jan 99 - 05:29 PM
Lesley N. 05 Jan 99 - 06:26 PM
rick fielding 06 Jan 99 - 05:32 PM
Bruce O. 06 Jan 99 - 05:38 PM
Joe Offer 07 Jan 99 - 05:16 AM
Pork Sausage Mike 12 Oct 02 - 03:56 PM
Pork Sausage Mike 12 Oct 02 - 04:03 PM
Rick Fielding 12 Oct 02 - 04:39 PM
Pork Sausage Mike 13 Oct 02 - 12:59 PM
Bat Goddess 13 Oct 02 - 04:40 PM
Malcolm Douglas 13 Oct 02 - 08:29 PM
Art Thieme 16 Oct 02 - 12:53 AM
Artful Codger 06 May 07 - 12:16 AM
Q 06 May 07 - 10:36 PM
Malcolm Douglas 06 May 07 - 11:50 PM
Anglo 07 May 07 - 12:19 AM
Artful Codger 07 May 07 - 07:13 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:



Subject: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Lesley N.
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 04:22 PM

I have come across two tunes named the Bay of Biscay - strangely both are about shipwrecks - one is in DT (Ye Gentlemen of England... etc) another was written by Andrew Cherry (1762-1812) (Loud roars the dreadful thunder... - not in DT).

Does anyone know any background to these?

Thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Bruce O.
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 05:29 PM

"You Gentlemen of England" is a descendent of J[ohn] P[hillips] "Neptune's Raging Fury", c 1660, in my broadside ballad index. It the basis on which some other songs are built; 1: "Ye Gentleman of England" - Laws K2 and 2: "The Bay of Biscay, Oh" - Laws K3.

There's more than one "Bay of Biscay" song. Cherry was an Irishman that wrote several popular songs in the early 19th century. I seem to recall that he was an actor, and the songs were mostly for plays, and that he died tragically..


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Lesley N.
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 06:26 PM

Found it! Some day there will be a "Find in Page" feature that will know when I put in "Ye Gentleman" I will accept "You Gentleman" as an alternative!

Interesting about Cherry. I've exhuasted the Net for information - or exhuasted myself on the net as the case may be. I'll check Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians next time I'm in the library to see if there's anything there. At least I have a place to start now!

As always, thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: rick fielding
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 05:32 PM

I've been singing a "Bay of Biscay-o" for years now that begins "Of all the harbours east and west".... I've forgotten where I learned it. Anybody heard of it and have a source?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Bruce O.
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 05:38 PM

See source in DT file BISCAYO.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Joe Offer
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 05:16 AM

Click here to get to the lyrics in the Digital Tradition database for "Of all the harbours east and west." Entering "biscay" in the search box in the upper-right corner of this page will bring up more than one song, but may also bring up more information.
Here's the introduction to "The Bonny Bay of Biscay-O" in Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection
We have been able to find no information in print about this song. English friends have told us that this is one of the folk songs blandly thrust upon small English school children, with no information about its origin or usage. There is a version of the "Gypsy Laddie" (Child No. 200) in which the chorus says, "Some sang high and some sang low, and some sang 'The Bonny Bay of Biscay-O.'" The song has not been found elsewhere in America, although a song of the same name appears (words only) - with very different words - on page 515 of American Folk Poetry, edited by Duncan Emrich. That song may be heard on Library of Congress field recording AFS, 4464B as recorded by Alan Lomax from the singing of Mrs. Carrie Grover of Gorham, Maine, in 1941. Mrs. Grover's song is about a terrible storm at sea and the British ship that was nearly destroyed in the Bay of Biscay-O.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Pork Sausage Mike
Date: 12 Oct 02 - 03:56 PM

Hi Rick,
I heard this song recently but the tape was in such a poor condition I could not hear the words atall well The chorus has a line or two which goes: there she lay "all that day" or "til next day" in the bay of Biscay-O. It was sung by Uffa Fox(a wealthy yachtsman from the UK) on a tape of his Sea Shanties,

Hope this will ring a few bells! maybe Eight
Cheers Mike Dowding aka Pork Sausage Mike


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Pork Sausage Mike
Date: 12 Oct 02 - 04:03 PM

Hi Rick, sorry to bother you again. I have printed out your version of the song but the chorus is different to the one sung bt Uffa Fox.
I have found the tune on Jc'sTunefinder or is it ABCtunefinder..on web and it is No.329....a lovely melody.
Cheers again PSM
Click for tunes


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 12 Oct 02 - 04:39 PM

Uh, hi Mike. I'm a tad confused here. WHAT version did you learn off WHAT tape?

Cheers

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Pork Sausage Mike
Date: 13 Oct 02 - 12:59 PM

Hi Rick,
I have never learned The Bay of Biscay-O.....just heard it. I'm not sure of the name of the tape I heard and could not hear many of the lyrics, yet could quite clearly remember the melody which was one of those that stick in my little ol'memory.
After E-mailing you I persevered with the web and found the words on: www.contemplator.com/folk/biscay.html...via Mudcat!...wonderful!.written by Andrew Cherry (1762-1812)and I
played the tune on midi.
I found the tune on Jc's tunefinder on web.
.....so now I'm sorted, until I learn it!........just retired you see, and have time on my hands now to do the things I want to do

Many thanks for your time and trouble....marvellous service......Mike D.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 13 Oct 02 - 04:40 PM

The "Bay of Biscay" that I sing I learned from a Tim Hart & Maddy Prior LP.

"My Willy sails on board the tender
And where he is I do not know.
For seven long years I have been constantly waiting
Til he crossed the Bay of Biscay-o"

Ghost ballad, actually.

Linn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 13 Oct 02 - 08:29 PM

A completely different song, not related to the subject of this thread.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Art Thieme
Date: 16 Oct 02 - 12:53 AM

I always have love the way FRANK WARNER sang this song on what I believe was an Elektra LP.

Art Thieme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: NEPTUNE'S RAGING FURY
From: Artful Codger
Date: 06 May 07 - 12:16 AM

Below is the text of "Neptune's Raging Fury", copied from the broadside at the Bodley site. The Bodley index lists the author as Martin Parker, but no author appears on the broadside itself. They date their copy somewhere around 1700. Earlier in this thread, Bruce O. stated that the song was actually written by John Phillips, c.1660, according to his broadside ballad index.

An abbreviated recording of this song was made by The City Waites on their LP A gorgeous gallery of Gallant Inventions (1977), where they used the song's subtitle, "The Gallant Seaman's Sufferings". They sang only verses 2, 3, 9 and 14. I'm glad to have tripped over this thread, because I'd always hoped there were more verses.

I've left the spelling and punctuation as it was, correcting only a couple spacing errors. I also added verse numbers and coalesced line pairs, as indicated. I did not retain italics.


Neptune's Raging Fury
Or, The Gallant Seaman's Sufferings.

Being a Relation of their Perils and Dangers, and of the extraordinary Hazards they undergo in their noble Adventures. Together with their undaunted Valour and rare Constancy in all their Extremities: and the manner of their Rejoicing on Shore, at their return home. Tune: When the Stormy Winds do Blow, &c.

1. You gentlemen of England / that live at home at ease,
Full little do you think upon / the danger of the Seas;
Give ear unto the Mariners, / and they will plainly show,
The cares and the fears / when the stormy winds do blow.

2. All you that will be Sea-men, / must bear a valiant heart,
For when you come upon the Seas, / you must not think to start,
Nor once to be faint-hearted, / in hail, rain, or snow,
Nor to shrink nor to shrink / when the stormy winds do blow.

3. The bitter storms and tempests / poor Sea-men must endure,
Both day and night, with many a fright / we seldom rest secure;
Our sleep it is disturbed, / with visions strange to know,
And with dreams on the streams, / when the stormy winds do blow.

4. In claps of roaring thunder, / which darkness doth enforce,
We often find our ships to stray / beyond our wanted course;
Which causeth great distractions, / and sinks our hearts full low,
'Tis in vain to complain / when the stormy winds do blow.

5. Sometimes in Neptune's bosom / our ship is tost in waves,
And every Man expecting / the Sea to be their graves;
Then up aloft she mounteth, / and down again so low;
'Tis with waves, O with waves / when the stormy winds do blow.

6. Then down again we fall to prayer, / with all our might and thought,
When refuge all doth fail us, / 'tis that must bear us out,
To God we call for succour, / for he it is we know,
That must aid us, and save us / when the stormy winds do blow.

7. The Lawyer and the Usurer, / that fits in gowns of fur,
In closets warm can take no harm, / abroad they need not stir;
When winter fierce with cold doth pierce, / and beats with hail and snow,
We are sure to endure / when the stormy winds do blow.

8. We bring home costly merchandise, / and jewels of great price,
To serve our English Gallantry / with many a rare device;
To please the English Gallantry, / our pains we freely show,
For we toyl and moile / when the stormy winds do blow.

9. We sometime sail to the Indies, / to fetch home Spices rare,
Sometimes 'gain to France and Spain, / for Wines beyond compare;
Whilst Gallants are carousing / in Taverns on a row,
Then we sweep o'er the deep, / when the stormy winds do blow.

10. When Tempests are blown over, / and greatest fears are past,
Ay, weather fair, and temperate air, / we straight lye down to rest;
But when the billows tumble, / and waves do furious grow,
Then we rouse up, up we rouse / when the stormy winds do blow.

11. If Enemies oppose us, / when England is at Wars,
With any Foreign Nations, / we fear not wounds nor scars;
Our roaring guns shall teach 'em / our valour for to know,
Whilst they reel, in the keel, / when the stormy winds do blow.

12. We are no cowardly Shrinkers, / but true English Men bred,
We'll play our parts like valiant Hearts, / and never fly for dread;
We'll ply our business nimbly, / where are we come or go,
With our Mates to the Straights, / when the stormy winds do blow.

13. Then courage, all brave Mariners, / and never be dismayed,
Whilst we have bold adventures, / we ne'er shall want a trade;
Our Merchants will employ us / to fetch them wealth, I know;
Then be bold, work for gold, / when the stormy winds do blow.

14. When we return in safety, with wages for our pains,
The Tapster and the Vintner / will help to share our gains;
We'll call for Liquor roundly, / and pay before we go;
Then we'll roar on the shore, / when the stormy winds do blow.

Printed by and for C. Brown and T. Norris, and sold at the Looking-glass on London-bridge.


The tune reference indicates that this song has earlier roots. Is it derived from the land-based "Stormy Winds/Shepherd's Song" or vice versa, or are they of parallel derivation?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr. Add: The Bay of Biscay O!
From: Q
Date: 06 May 07 - 10:36 PM

"Neptune's Raging Fury," from the Bodleian broadside, is printed in Christopher Stone, 1906, "Sea Songs and Ballads," Oxford University Press. In the notes, Stone remarks that it is altered from Martin Parker's original song, ca. 1635.
Stone says it also appears in Roxburghe Ballads (Ballad Society), VI 431ff.
Also in Stone's collection is "The Bay of Biscay O!" by Andrew Cherry.

Lyr. Add: THE BAY OF BISCAY O!
Andrew Cherry

Loud roared the dreadful thunder,
The rain a deluge show'rs;
The clouds were rent asunder
By lightning's vivid pow'rs!
The night both drear and dark;
Our poor deluded bark!
Till next day,
There she lay,
In the Bay of Biscay O!
2.
Now, dash's upon the billow,
Her op'ning timbers creak:
Each fears a wat'ry pillow!
None stop the dreadful leak!-
To cling to slipp'ry shrouds
Each breathless seaman tries,
As she lay,
Till the day,
In the Bay of Biscay O!
3.
At length the wish'd-for morrow
Broke through the hazy sky;
Absorb'd in silent sorrow,
Each heav'd a bitter sigh!-
The dismal wreck to view
Struck horror to the crew,
As she lay,
On that day,
In the Bay of Biscay O!
4.
Her yielding timbers sever;
Her pitchy seams are rent!
When Heav'n (all bounteous ever)
Its boundless mercy sent!
A sail in sight appears!
We hail her with three cheers!
Now we sail
With the gale
From the Bay of Biscay O!

Christopher Stone, 1906, "Sea Songs and Ballads," XX, pp. 32-33.

Notes, p. 200, by Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge, G. C. B., who remarked, "Introduced to the forecastle from the shore and rather a favorite, most likely because of its rousing chorus."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 06 May 07 - 11:50 PM

Bruce didn't say that 'the song was actually written by John Phillips'. Martin Parker wrote earlier than Phillips, so the lineage is more complicated than 'Artful Codger' (god, how I hate having to quote those ridiculous internet aliases. Why on earth won't people use their real names?) has assumed. For more detailed commentary from Bruce, and the text of the 'prototype', see http://www.csufresno.edu/folklore/Olson/:

The praise of Sailors, heere set forth

The reference (omitted above) to the file at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads is Douce Ballads 2(167b).

See also Pepys Ballads:

Pepys 4.201: Neptunes Raging Fury
Pepys 1.420-421: Saylors for my money

There may be some relationship between this song (Roud 18526) and the much later 'Shepherd's Song' (Roud 284), but there is no clear connection beside the refrain; they are sung to different tunes, though the meter is the same.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Anglo
Date: 07 May 07 - 12:19 AM

Coming back to the Cherry song, it is printed in Hatton & Faning's "The Songs of England" Vol. 1.

Some slightly different words:

v.1
The night was drear and dark,
Our poor devoted bark,

v.2
Now, dash'd upon the billow
...
As she lay till next day

v.3
Struck horror in the crew
As she lay all that day

I remember it as a song we sang in school, ahh, when I was but a strip of a lad... so it did maintain some popularity (if not in the folk tradition).

However, an entry in the New Grove Dictionary of Music (under John Davy, the attributed composer of the music) reads:

Today he is remembered, if at all, for a fine sea-song, 'The Bay of Biscay', introduced in his opera Spanish Dollars. In fact the tune was that of a shanty sung to him by the tenor Charles Incledon, who had picked it up when he was a sailor in the 1780s.

...so as far as I'm concerned it is a folk song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: INFO: Bay of Biscay
From: Artful Codger
Date: 07 May 07 - 07:13 AM

Malcolm: Whinging about aliases here is like walking into a smoker's lounge and then complaining about all the smoke. Get a clue--and some grace.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 2 September 10:09 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.